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Tag: Google Doodle (1-10 of 50)

Google Doodle celebrates Rubik's Cube's 40th birthday

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Looking for a way to kill time? Google’s got your back: Today’s Google Doodle features an interactive Rubik’s Cube to celebrate the puzzle’s 40th birthday.

Back in 1974, a Hungarian architecture professor named Erno Rubik wanted to create an object that wouldn’t fall apart even if all its parts were moved independently. The Rubik’s Cube was born from that idea, and it took Rubik weeks to solve the puzzle once he created it. A year later, Rubik patented the cube and now, the Rubik’s Cube is the world’s top-selling puzzle game.

Rubik himself is now 69 and focuses his current work on promoting science in education.

Google Doodle honors Audrey Hepburn

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On what would have been her 85th birthday, Audrey Hepburn has received a high honor: a Google Doodle.

The image was adapted from a black and white photograph taken in 1956 by Yousuf Karsh. Though the style icon inspired several potential images from the Doodle team (which you can view here), they settled on one that reflected the Breakfast at Tiffany’s actress’ beauty, grace, and humanitarian work to improve the lives of children. Behind Hepburn’s Doodle portrait are images of the legend dancing with kids.

“Finding the right solution for someone as timeless as Audrey proved a tricky task,” says artist Jennifer Hom. “Not only was she a classically beautiful actress, she also dedicated her life to philanthropy. I wanted to show both sides of her life’s work.”

Hepburn passed away in 1993 at the age of 63 from a rare type of cancer.

Google Doodle celebrates chemist Percy Julian's birthday

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Today, Google celebrates what would have been the 115th birthday of Percy Julian, a chemist whose research led to chemical birth control and immune-suppressing medications.

Julian was born in Alabama on April 11, 1899, at a time when his city of Montgomery didn’t provide public education for black students post-middle school. Despite this, Julian persevered and ended up both attending and excelling at Indiana’s DePauw University. He later returned to the university to work on synthesizing plant products into medicine, where he found much success; some of his accomplishments include creating a synthetic cortisone to inexpensively treat arthritis and discovering a treatment for glaucoma.

Julian received many honors in (and after) his lifetime, including being the first black chemist to be elected to the National Academy of Sciences. He passed away in 1975.

Google honors Dorothy Irene Height

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Today’s simple, striking Google homepage Doodle honors what would have been the 102nd birthday of Dorothy Irene Height.

Height was a civil and women’s rights activist who’s credited with bridging the gap between the Civil Rights and Feminist movements. She was awarded both the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1994 and the Congressional Gold Medal in 2004.

Height sat on the stage behind Martin Luther King Jr. as he gave his famous “I Have a Dream” speech, according to Time. She also co-founded the National Women’s Political Caucus with Gloria Steinem and Betty Friedan. After her death in 2010, President Obama called her the “godmother of the civil rights movement.”

You can watch President Obama’s eulogy of Height below: READ FULL STORY

Google Doodle celebrates the spring equinox

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Despite the cold weather still plaguing much of the nation, today is technically the first day of spring. And Google, for one, is ready to celebrate!

Google is marking the moment that the sun crosses the equator with a new animated Doodle that features beautiful flowers blooming. An equinox only happens twice a year, in March and again in September. During the spring equinox, the sun shines directly on the equator, and the length of day and night is nearly equal. In the northern hemisphere, the March equinox is designated the “spring equinox,” but for the southern hemisphere it is the “fall equinox.”

Here’s hoping the warm weather this doodle illustrates actually comes soon!

Google celebrates St. Patrick's Day

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Google goes green!

In honor of St. Patrick’s Day, Google’s homepage Doodle features a green stained-glass drawing. The day celebrates Ireland’s most commonly-recognized patron saint, Patrick, who died on March 17, according to tradition.

Stateside, this year’s biggest St. Patrick’s Day news story might be Boston Mayor Marty Walsh announcing that he will not participate in the annual South Boston St. Patrick’s Day parade because the event excludes LGBT organizations. (New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio will not march in his local St. Patrick’s Day parade for the same reason.)

Never fear: The Chicago River is still green.

Google Doodle celebrates John Steinbeck's birthday

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Google is celebrating what would have been John Steinbeck’s 112th birthday by highlighting some of his most popular works in its homepage Doodle today.

Click anywhere on the drawing, and you’ll be taken to images depicting some of the Steinbeck’s most iconic books. Five in all, the set includes The Grapes of Wrath, Cannery Row, Of Mice and Men, The Pearl, and Travels with Charley. (Oddly, East of Eden was left off the list.) After arriving at the image, users can then click anywhere on the picture to summon a famous quote from the story, which appears over the drawing.

Steinbeck authored 27 books over his lifetime, and received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1962. The Pulitzer Prize-winning author passed away in 1968.

Google celebrates Valentine's Day with help from 'This American Life'

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Google’s Charm Offensive is strong on Anna Howard Shaw Day Valentine’s Day.

Today’s homepage Doodle (in the United States, at least) is decked out in candy hearts — you know, the kind you gave to your crush (and everyone else in the class) when you were 8.

Click on any of the hearts, and you get to hear one of six short ‘n sweet stories from real-life lovebirds describing how they fell in love. The snippets come from public radio’s This American Life. They hit a bunch of different tones, but the funny ones may be the best. Take “Crush,” for example, in which a teenage girl declares:  “This one time I sneezed … and he goes, ‘You know, you have a really cute sneeze.’ … I was all day on that sneeze comment. I must have told every one of my friends.”

Love is a battlefield. Break out some chocolates and give all the stories a listen on Google’s homepage.

Google celebrates Olympics and human rights in new homepage Doodle

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On the day of the opening ceremonies in the 2014 Sochi Winter Games, Google is celebrating the Olympics — and also equality. Instead of keeping the colors in the picture in the order of the Google logo, it arranges them in rainbow order, likely a nod to the flag representing LGBTQ issues.

Below the image, the search engine highlights a quote from the Olympic charter: “The practice of sport is a human right. Every individual must have the possibility of practicing sport, without discrimination of any kind and in the Olympic spirit, which requires mutual understanding with a spirit of friendship, solidarity and fair play.”

When clicking anywhere on the Doodle, Google takes users to the search results for “Olympic Charter.”

The first night of the Games took place last night, and, in addition to NBC showing highlights from new sports such as slopestyle and team skate, Bob Costas also discussed with viewers the many issues at play in the Sochi Olympics, including human rights problems.

Google celebrates Zora Neale Hurston

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Google Doodle’s latest celebrates what would have been the 123rd birthday of anthropologist and author Zora Neale Hurston. A prominent figure in the Harlem Renaissance and a Guggenheim Fellow, Hurston is probably best known as the author of Their Eyes Were Watching God, which was turned into a 2005 movie starring Halle Berry.

The Google homepage drawing depicts a portrait of Hurston on top of what looks to be the setting of one of the many folklore tales she wrote. PBS has aired a few documentary retrospectives of her and her work; you can watch a clip from the most recent, 2008′s  Zora Neale Hurston: Jump at the Sun, below.  READ FULL STORY

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