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Tag: George Lucas (1-10 of 19)

George Lucas chooses Chicago over California as the site of his museum

Star Wars creator George Lucas has selected Chicago as the future home of his collection of art and movie memorabilia, opting for Illinois over Los Angeles and San Francisco. Pending approval from the city’s planning commission, Lucas’s institution (which is currently in the process of voting on a name change from the Lucas Cultural Arts Museum to the Lucas Museum of Narrative Art) will be built on parking lots near Soldier Field, home of the Chicago Bears.

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'The People vs. George Lucas 2' will focus on the 'disneyfication' of the 'Star Wars' franchise

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Currently there are three Star Wars movies in production at Disney. There’s Star Wars: Episode VII–Maybe the Ancient Fear, directed by J.J. Abrams, which arrives in December 2015. Then there’s Gareth Edwards’ Star Wars spinoff, coming in December 2016, which is definitely about Boba Fett or definitely not about Boba Fett, depending on which way the wind is blowing. And there’s Josh Trank’s other Star Wars spinoff, which is definitely about Young Han Solo or definitely about Young Greedo or possibly about the Sarlacc Pit’s early days. READ FULL STORY

'Star Wars' sequel lands working title? Is 'The Ancient Fear' the next chapter?

The great thing about taking over the Star Wars franchise from George Lucas is that it will be virtually impossible for J.J. Abrams to be criticized for the title to his 2015 sequel. Not after The Phantom Menace and The Kingdom of the Crystal Skull. Now that the core cast has been announced, attention has shifted to what the film will be called, and Harry Knowles at Ain’t It Cool is confident that the working title is Star Wars: Episode VII — The Ancient Fear. Reportedly, the title “refers to Max Von Sydow’s villain who makes Pazuzu look like a p—y!” — Pazuzu being the demon that Von Sydow’s priest battled in The Exorcist. READ FULL STORY

The 20 Best Summer Blockbusters of All Time: 'Raiders of the Lost Ark'

In 2014, it’s difficult to appreciate the awe felt by uninitiated audiences who saw Raiders of the Lost Ark in theaters in 1981. Think about the film’s opening scenes, which introduce Indiana Jones and his now-iconic fedora in the jungles of South America. He narrowly avoids getting shot in the back by his mutinous guides, proves his Zorro-esque expertise with a whip, cleverly maneuvers through the deadly booby-traps of an ancient Peruvian temple, flicks away tarantulas like they’re gnats, nabs the prized golden idol but sets off a chain-reaction of destruction that includes a giant boulder chasing him back out into the sunlight, finds himself surrounded by angry natives and a smug Eurotrash rival, outruns them and their poisonous darts to an idling sea-plane that barely gets him in the air in time — only to find himself sharing the front seat with a giant snake, which we soon learn, is his kryptonite.

In just 12 minutes and 47 seconds, audiences experienced more pulsating action than most action movies stuff into two full hours. It was exhilarating. And it only picked up steam from there. Indy fought Nazis in Nepal and re-teamed with lost love Marion (Karen Allen), infamously dueled with an Arab swordsman in Cairo, discovered the Well of Souls where the mysterious Ark was hidden (guarded by hundreds of slithering asps), and then stole the Ark back from the Germans in the death-defying stunt that had Indy being dragged underneath and behind a speeding truck — a clever homage to the classic scene in John Ford’s iconic western Stagecoach. READ FULL STORY

'Star Wars': A look back at Year One of the Disney regime

The still un-subtitled Star Wars sevenquel just received an official release date. If all goes as planned, J.J. Abrams will reboot his second straight Star franchise on Dec. 18, 2015. The key line being “if all goes as planned.” First announced just a little over a year ago, the new Star Wars film sits at the uneasy nexus of corporate ambitions: It’s the first step in a larger plan to revitalize one of the most popular franchise in the last half-century of fictional media, with an earnings potential of several billion dollars at stake.

There’s a lot on the line. The film’s first year of gestation was closely monitored and rife with rumor and hearsay and sudden twists. And the story of the development of the next Star Wars movie is also the story of the new regime gradually rebuilding the Star Wars universe (while destroying certain remnants of the old regime.) Forthwith, a look back at Year One of Episode VII. READ FULL STORY

George Lucas has not spoken to J.J. Abrams about the next 'Star Wars'

When George Lucas handed over the deed for the Star Wars galaxy to Disney, he retained a role as a “creative consultant” on any future iterations of Star Wars-y stuff, including the sequel trilogy currently being prepped. Fans have long debated the meaning of that “creative consultancy,” because the internet was specifically created for fans to analyze every bit of Star Wars news.

However, in a new interview with Access Hollywood — recorded after his win at the Daytime Emmys for the now-canceled Clone Wars series — George Lucas indicates that the extent of his “consulting” is enjoying a well-earned retirement.
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'Star Wars Rebels' pilot to launch on Disney Channel -- EXCLUSIVE

Star Wars Rebels, a one-hour animated pilot already in production at Lucasfilm, is scheduled to premiere in Fall 2014 on the Disney Channel before the new brand leaps to Disney XD for the ongoing series, according to Lucasfilm sources.

The series will mine material from the 19 years that follow Episode III: Revenge of the Sith and precede the Episode IV: A New Hope. In other words, using the life of the Skywalker twins as a measure, the series will be active in the story years that come after their separation as newborns and before their (unwitting) reunion on the prison level of the Death Star. READ FULL STORY

'Star Wars' meets 'Faster, Pussycat!' in revamped action figures commissioned by Patton Oswalt

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Ah, so this is why neologists invented the word “geekgasm.” Action figure customizer Jamie Follis — known online as “Sillof” — has won legions of fans for his creative reimaginings of toys, which have cast the Avengers as Victorian-era heroes and the Justice League as steampunk creations.

Among those fans is comedian/geek hero Patton Oswalt, who partially based his character in Young Adult on Follis. After years of admiring his work, Oswalt recently gave Follis a new challenge: Transform the denizens of Star Wars into characters inspired by the works of pulp-master Russ Meyer, the director behind buxom ’60s campfests like Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill! There was just one additional catch — since Meyer’s films were nearly all female-centric, Oswalt wanted the characters to be gender-flipped as well.

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Han Solo as a lizard? The inside scoop on 'The Star Wars' from Dark Horse

The Jedi universe wasn’t built in a day and the construction process had some strange stages. If you thumb through the 1974 draft of the George Lucas script for The Star Wars (as it was called then) you’ll see a funhouse version of the most famous space epic that includes a warrior named Starkiller and a reptilian alien named Han Solo.

That version of Star Wars has been a relatively obscure artifact, but now it will get a spotlight of its own in a major adaptation by Dark Horse Comics that maps out a tale that’s both familiar and totally alien.

For the Oregon-based comics company, the project may be the great farewell to the Jedi mythology. Star Wars comics have been a core part of the Dark Horse’s indie publishing empire since the early 1990s. Now, after the Disney purchase of Lucasfilm, Dark Horse is likely to lose the license in the months ahead. We caught up with Mike Richardson, founder of Dark Horse, and Randy Stradley, the Dark Horse editor who has been the architect of the brand’s Dark Horse success, to talk about rediscovered universes and losing Empires. READ FULL STORY

'Star Wars: Return of the Jedi' back on big screen at EW's CapeTown Festival

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The Jedi are returning.

On May the Fourth, now celebrated far and wide as Star Wars Day, Entertainment Weekly’s CapeTown Film Festival will bring the greatest deep-space saga of them all back to the big screen for a special one-day event: a 30th anniversary revival of Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi that takes the classic back to the site of its May 1983 world premiere, the historic Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood.

We’ve scheduled four Jedi screenings (10 a.m., 2 p.m., 6 p.m., 10p.m.) on May the Fourth as well as special appearances by some famous faces and beloved characters from the Jedi universe. The anniversary and location add a special sparkle to the day, but the event is also energized with the intrigue of the future with a new planned Star Wars, which will, for the first time on screen, take the tale chronologically beyond the fiery funeral of Darth Vader, one of the most iconic villains in the history of Hollywood popcorn.

Celluloid history infuses every corner of the Egyptian Theatre, which opened in October 1922 by introducing a new Tinseltown tradition — the very first Hollywood world premiere. The storied movie palace is an amazing site for the inaugural edition of the CapeTown Film Festival, which shares its name with the EW.com section that launched early this year. The brand has already become a powerhouse presence as the hub for EW coverage of pop culture’s most vivid corners: sci-fi, superheroes, fantasy, horror, comics, video games and animation.

NEXT: How to get tickets…

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