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Tag: Geekery (61-70 of 316)

New 'Lord of the Rings' LEGO: Which scene would you reenact?

It’s been nine years since the final installment of The Lord of the Rings franchise hit theaters, but I still can’t let go. But soon, however, I won’t be able to let go of my new LEGO blocks. In June, the toy company will release a line of Lord of the Rings LEGO for our geeky amusement, which means I have another way to occupy my time other than repeat viewings of behind-the-scenes featurettes on the Lord of the Rings director’s-cut DVDs. Wait, you mean I could actually spend my days reading new books and learning new things and perhaps even going outside to experience life? Psh. That shall not pass. READ FULL STORY

2012 is the geekiest year for movies ever. Is that a good thing?

There was a time when Hollywood was not solely in the business of making franchise films with a built-in geek fanbase. In the early ’90s, science-fiction films were mostly low-budget B-movies and Star Trek sequels. The success of Tim Burton’s Batman films didn’t immediately kick-start a superhero renaissance, unless you were a big fan of Steel and The Shadow, you weirdo. And there simply weren’t any epic fantasy films, although an imaginative young Tolkien fan could create a reasonable facsimile of a live-action Lord of the Rings by watching Willow on mute with Glenn Yarbrough’s Hobbit song playing on your tape-deck stereo system. READ FULL STORY

George Lucas says he's done with 'Star Wars' movies

Last fall, my esteemed and wordy colleague Darren Franich posted an essay entitled “Stop hating George Lucas, and stop loving Star Wars so much: Why it’s time to grow up.” It was in reaction to the uproar surrounding Lucas’ decision to make Darth Vader say “Nooooo!” at the climax of Return of the Jedi, and it touched a nerve, inspiring mostly spirited and totally geeky online debate over whether Lucas’ many changes and alterations to the Star Wars films over the years had, in fact, ruined our childhoods.

Well, Lucas haters, you’ve gotten your wish: In a story appearing in the upcoming issue of The New York Times Magazine and posted online yesterday, the man who helped invent the modern summer movie blockbuster says he’s retiring from making big-budget feature films, including and especially any more Star Wars movies. “Why would I make any more,” he says in the story, “when everybody yells at you all the time and says what a terrible person you are?” Yes, anonymous fanboy commentors, George Lucas has read your Han-Solo-shot-first! screeds, and he’s taken it kinda personally: “I’m saying: ‘Fine. But my movie, with my name on it, that says I did it, needs to be the way I want it.’”  READ FULL STORY

'Merlin': The wizard changes the rules of the game -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

The most intriguing twist in the TV series Merlin was the portrayal of Camelot as a kingdom in the grip of an anti-magic crusade. That meant that the series protagonist — a young incarnation of the famous titular wizard — was essentially living like an X-Man, forced to keep his sorcery skills hidden even from his closest friends. On this week’s episode of Merlin, the titular young wizard has to make a pivotal decision to save the wizard-hating King Uther using sorcery. In this exclusive clip, Merlin has a heated exchange with his friend and mentor Gaius. Check out the video below, and start getting excited for what promises to be a major turning point in the Merlin mythology. READ FULL STORY

Can 'Alcatraz,' 'The River,' 'Touch,' or 'Awake' make genre television successful on a broadcast network?

Around the midpoint of the last decade, broadcast television was seriously geeking out. The gradual success (and massive DVD sales) of 24 proved that viewers were interested in complicated story lines; the breakout success of Lost proved that viewers were even more interested in complicated story lines with some kind of sci-fi-fantasy twist. Respectable broadcast networks were suddenly greenlighting TV shows that sound like bad Image comic books from the ’90s: Does anyone actually remember Threshold, Surface, or Journeyman? READ FULL STORY

'Mad Men' inspires special 1960's 'Newsweek' issue

Seems like everyone, even Newsweek magazine, wants a piece of Jon Hamm.

Newsweek editor Tina Brown announced today that in promotion for Mad Men’s fifth season premiere on March 25 (!), the magazine would be going Mad. (Well, not Mad.) Specifically, the entire publication would revert back to its 1960s design — including the advertisements.

Brown told Ad Age, “Newsweek was very much on the cultural forefront at the time of the show. It covered the events that are so much of the background for the show’s drama — the burgeoning civil rights movement, the women’s rights movement, the Vietnam War. That was Newsweek‘s cutting-edge beat and its flourishing journalistic subject. So it seemed like a wonderful marriage in a sense to take that and apply it to the magazine, to make the magazine an homage to the period.” READ FULL STORY

CES: Ultrabooks? 4K TVs? Ice Cream Sandwich? The 5 biggest trends to look out for at the mega trade show

ces-2011

Las Vegas is about to become gearhead Nirvana once again.

The annual International Consumer Electronics Show opens tomorrow for 140,000 tech enthusiasts hoping to get a first glimpse at the latest cutting-edge computers, tablets, smartphones, gaming consoles, TVs, and cameras. With 1.7 million square feet of Las Vegas Convention Center space to cover, you can expect that the only sins coming out of Sin City until CES wraps up on Friday will be the unrealistic expectations fostered by the 2,700 vendors setting up shop. It’s a testament to the size and enduring power of the 45-year-old trade show that Spike will be devoting four hours of its Tuesday lineup, starting at 1:00 p.m. ET, to updates from the floor with host Eliza Dushku. Other celebrities expected to attend CES this year include 50 Cent and Justin Bieber, in addition to TV workout guru Jillian Michaels, who represents a growing trend connecting the tech and fitness worlds.

The relevance of CES may be on the wane. Many smartphone manufacturers are holding on to their most anticipated gear until February’s Mobile World Congress. And as usual, Apple won’t be in attendance. Nor will Amazon, Google, or Facebook, which run their own events throughout the year. And Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer, who’ll be giving the keynote address tonight, has announced that this will be the last year his company will attend as well. CES, though, is still the event that introduced the VCR to the world in 1970, the Nintendo Entertainment System in 1985, the TiVo in 1999, and Blu-ray in 2003. So count it out at your own peril.

Here are five of the biggest trends we expect to see at this year’s show. READ FULL STORY

Steve Jobs action figure: Freaky or fantastic (or a little of both)?

What will they come up with next? First, there were Jersey Shore Christmas baubles, now we’ve got a playful tribute to Steve Jobs that’s just as portable — and twice as playful! — as his own products. Chinese toy company In Icons and Hong Kong-based manufacturer Dragon In Dreams have crafted an eerily lifelike, albeit it 12-inch-tall, Jobs action figure. The unauthorized figurine (it’s not a toy!) is scheduled to go on sale next month for $99. That’s two Shuffles or an Apple TV unit in Jobs-ian terms. READ FULL STORY

Princess Leia headphone covers: More socially acceptable than a gold bikini?

I know we’re a couple days late for gift-giving, but file this under ‘things I can’t live without and ZOMG how did this not exist when I was camping out for the New Hope rerelease in 1997?’: Princess Leia headphone covers.

That’s right – it appears that the obvious has only just now come to Etsy, that treasure trove of handicrafts. Tech blog Geekology discovered this piece of pop culture gold, and notes that you could alternatively (as generations have done before) “glue a pair of cinnamon rolls to your headphones,” but, um, that sounds sticky.

The force is definitely with creator Jacqui Longlegs who posted her various Leia looks on her blog.

Better stock up now — Comic-Con is only six months away, people.

‘Geek Love’ react: Surprisingly awesome?

It’s hard out there for a geek. They may grow up to be super-successful, but the nerds on last night’s TLC special Geek Love proved they still have a ways to go in the dating department.

In the two special episodes that aired (TLC is currently testing the show for a potential series), viewers were treated to the personal tales of a handful of the individuals that make the pilgrimage to Comic Con each year — many of them sadly single. The show centered around a speed-dating event at NY Comic Con, led by Ryan Glitch, founder of Sci-Fi Speed Dating. Glitch explained he got inspired to create this event because the typical bar scene doesn’t work for Comic Con folk. When the costumed Trekkies, Potterphiles, and Iron Men came into the convention center, you could see why: It was simply too much fandom for most people to take. But what made the TLC special work — and what separated it from the network’s other recent programs, like Virgin Diaries — was that it didn’t feel like anyone was being exploited or mocked. The show was set up so viewers would root for these socially awkward people to find love — and I did. READ FULL STORY

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