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Tag: Geekery (91-100 of 314)

Don Cheadle plays Captain Planet, turns everybody into trees. The power is yours to watch!

If there was still any question left on how to bring the beloved ’90s animated series Captain Planet to the big screen, Don Cheadle and Funny or Die just answered it. Just bring together the plot of the classic series (i.e. finding ways to teach kids about the importance of recycling), the theme song, and all the characters, including the Planeteers and their respective powers (Earth! Fire! Wind! Water! Heart!), and of course, Captain Planet. Only this time make Captain Planet into a power-abusing, homicidal superhero who replenishes the Earth’s natural resources by turning people, pets, and even babies into trees and shrubbery. Also, change his catchphrase “The power is yours!” to “The power is mine, bitches!” and you’ve got, arguably, the best remake ever on your hands. Watch the full, NSFW clip below: READ FULL STORY

'Sin City 2' has hired a new writer. Can the long-awaited sequel live up to the hype?

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Sin City occupies a strange, important place in the history of comic book films. Director Robert Rodriguez didn’t just honor the spirit of Frank Miller’s hard-boiled graphic novel series; he did everything in his power to directly translate the look and feel of the series into movie form, recreating specific panels and even hiring Miller himself as a co-director. For the segment of the fanboy population that values fidelity to the source material above all else — the strict constructionists, let’s call them — Sin City was a dream come true. The film’s style proved influential: In the wake of the failure of Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow, Sin City rescued the notion of making an entire movie in front of a greenscreen, thus serving as a test case for the megahit 300 (another Frank Miller “translation”) and the eventual misery of Green Lantern. READ FULL STORY

Videogames vs. Movies: Have games replaced films as the modern popular narrative medium?

Comparing one narrative medium to another is a tricky business. Anyone who has read a Harry Potter book and then seen the ensuing film adaptation — which is to say, almost everyone on earth —  knows that every storytelling method has its own strengths and weaknesses. Still, there is something particularly fascinating about the rivalry between movies and videogames. Cinema was the original popular art form, but it has spent over half a century fighting against rival media: Television, home video, and finally the videogame, which has evolved in just a few short decades from the primordial elements of Pong into the culture-defining medium of Call of Duty, Grand Theft Auto, and The Legend of Zelda.

The key to the great Film/Videogame debate is that the two have evolved alongside of each other. Videogames have become more “filmlike,” with more realistic characters and complex plotting. In turn, movies have absorbed many lessons from videogames, some of them good (films like The Hurt Locker and Children of Men have a you-are-there grandeur that feels very gamelike) and some of them not so good (watching Michael Bay’s Transformers trilogy is are exactly as enjoyable as watching your little brother play videogames you used to love before you turned 6). Now, I and fellow videogame fiend Adam B. Vary debate whether videogames have outright passed the movies as the popular narrative medium. Tell us your own thoughts in the comments. READ FULL STORY

What does the cancellation of 'Eureka' mean for SyFy's future?

The news that Syfy has canceled Eureka would have already been disappointing to fans — particularly since the network also backtracked on an earlier plan to order a shortened sixth season. But more than a few viewers are taking the news as evidence that the network formerly (and more accurately) known as the Sci-Fi Channel is suffering from an existential crisis. Commenter Doug sardonically voices the complaint of several EW readers when he says, “Now they have room for another Wrestling show or ‘Reality’ paranormal special.” Exombre notes: “MTV doesn’t show videos anymore, why should ‘Syfy’ have any legitimate science fiction?” Is Syfy having an identity crisis? READ FULL STORY

'Star Trek' theme park being developed in Jordan: What's your ride wish-list? We'll tell you ours!

Set phasers for fun! That’s because Star Trek’s getting the theme park treatment in Aqaba, Jordan. Set to begin construction in March 2012, the Red Sea Astrarium, a $1.5 billion development comprised of four hotels and 17 amusement-park-style attractions, will feature a Star Trek-themed entertainment center, including a “space-flight adventure” simulator ride (a la Disney’s Star Tours) based on the 45-year-old franchise.

Puzzled by Starfleet’s incursion into Jordan? READ FULL STORY

'Family Matters': Did you love or hate Urkel?

If you’re anywhere between the ages of, say, 20 and 35 and reading this website, the question of whether you gleefully devoured ABC’s Friday night, family-friendly line-up TGIF is purely rhetorical. Of course you did.

There’s no doubt you loved Full House, Step By Step, Boy Meets World, Sabrina the Teenage Witch, Perfect Strangers, and a variety of other ridiculously addictive shows. (Personally, I spent those Friday evenings stretched out on the floor of my living room with my three siblings and several Book It-earned personal pan pizzas from Pizza Hut. Holla! The ’90s were amazing.) But when it comes to one show in particular on that line-up, the block’s anchor for years — that’d be 8 p.m. resident Family Matters — the question isn’t whether you watched, but instead: What’s your opinion on Urkel? Because you certainly watched, and you certainly have an opinion on the polarizing character. READ FULL STORY

Kirk vs. Picard, part 2: What about Captain Sisko?

As we all know, pop-culture face-offs are, by their nature, bipolar. Chaplin vs. Keaton, Sean Connery vs. Roger Moore, McDonalds vs. Burger King. The saddest thing about this is that, like our two-party government, our options are limited. And, yet, nobody ever seems to care much for a third choice when it’s presented — I’m looking at you Harold Lloyd, Timothy Dalton, Wendy’s, Ralph Nader.

Earlier today, you witnessed my esteemed colleagues Darren Franich and Joseph Brannigan Lynch debate the respective merits of Captains James Tiberius Kirk and Jean-Luc Picard as if they represent all that the mighty United Federation of Planets has to offer. But PopWatchers, I come before you to argue for a third choice, a noble choice, the right choice: Captain Benjamin Lafayette Sisko. The anchor of that greatest of Star Trek series, the haunting, murky Deep Space Nine, is everything a Starfleet captain should be, even if he was merely a “Commander” for the first three seasons. READ FULL STORY

Captain Kirk vs. Captain Picard: Who is the greatest 'Star Trek' captain of them all?

In a deleted scene from Pulp Fiction, Uma Thurman offers a unified theory of pop culture, which (this being a Quentin Tarantino movie) doubles as a unified theory of humanity. “When it comes to important subjects,” she explains, “There’s only two ways a person can answer. For example, there’s two kinds of people in this world: Beatles people and Elvis people. Now Beatles people can like Elvis. And Elvis people can like the Beatles. But nobody likes them both equally. Somewhere, you have to make a choice. And that choice tells me who you are.” READ FULL STORY

Twitter fail: When celebrities think you care too much

As a journalist on the periphery of the outskirts of the periphery of the celebrity kingdom, I can tell you that famous people are better and smarter than us common folk. Their stories are better, their teeth are brighter, and their smell… delightful. So when I make the commitment to follow a bold-faced name on Twitter, I expect to be enlightened, entertained, or at least belittled in some way. For the most part, they don’t let me down. But occasionally, I’m left feeling empty.

Take, for example, Hugh Hefner. READ FULL STORY

An ode to 'Clarissa Explains It All'

The ’90s truly were all that. And so was the decade’s queen of cool, Clarissa Darling. Clarissa, played by Melissa Joan Hart, explained it all on her Nickelodeon series from 1991-94. And thanks to TeenNick’s new ’90s block, I get to relive all of my favorite moments all over again.

The revival of Clarissa Explains It All got me thinking about why I loved the show so much in the first place. READ FULL STORY

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