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Tag: Games (11-20 of 202)

'The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask' is coming to Nintendo 3DS

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When the Nintendo 3DS first launched in 2011, Nintendo re-released one of its most beloved games alongside it: 1998’s The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. Naturally, this prompted questions about that game’s 2000 follow-up—The Legend of Zelda: Majora’s Mask. Would that game be re-released as well?

Last night’s Nintendo Direct webcast kicked off with an answer: absolutely.

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Watch the new trailer for 'World of Warcraft: Looking for Group'

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Did you know that it’s been 10 years since World of WarCraft launched?

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'Grand Theft Auto V' re-release gets a new first-person camera mode

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Grand Theft Auto V is a year old, but all of a sudden it feels brand new.

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Sunset Overdrive: More is more in colorful shooter

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Sunset Overdrive is all about sensory overload. Everything is amped up to 11, and the characters, environments, weapons and plot of the game are all deliriously, gleefully over the top. The evil corporation Fizzco has rushed its latest energy drink, OverCharge Delirium XT, to market. Unfortunately, it has an unfortunate side effect: It turns consumers into rampaging mutants. You’re working as a janitor at the beverage’s launch party when the fizz hits the fan, and it’s up to you to clean up the mess. Fortunately, your cleaning tools of choice are an assortment of increasingly ridiculous guns. READ FULL STORY

Why the most frightening video games aren't horror games

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The last mainstream horror series to really take off in the video game world was a game called Dead Space. Dead Space was kind of like Alien but with cults and a virus that turned people to monsters and also you were maybe crazy? I’m not sure.

I never finished the first Dead Space game for the same reason I’ve not finished most horror games that aren’t Resident Evil 4—you can stop playing.

Unlike horror movies, where you’re watching horrible things happen to other people, horror games are very much about terrible things happening to a digital extension of yourself, and you can react to them the way you would in real life: with a resounding “nope” and a refusal to walk through the creepy door.

But horror works best when it’s unexpected, when it’s given room to creep in and slowly unsettle you, never explicitly pursuing you—just giving you enough room to scare yourself. Which is why the most frightening video games really aren’t horror games at all.

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Watch Stephen Colbert interview Anita Sarkeesian about Gamergate

On last night’s episode of The Colbert Report, the Comedy Central host took on Gamergate, gaming’s biggest controversy. The segment also included a surprise guest—feminist media critic Anita Sarkeesian.

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Classic LucasArts games are available again for the first time in years

For many, Lucasfilm is synonymous with Star Wars. There’s no reason why it shouldn’t be, either—Star Wars is huge.

But if you were playing video games at any point during the late ’80s throughout the ’90s, chances are you have a very different association to the studio bearing George Lucas’ name. Started in 1982 by the man himself, Lucasfilm Games (later LucasArts) would become a beloved games studio that didn’t just make great Star Wars games (like the classic Star Wars: TIE Fighter), but quirky and frequently hilarious adventure games like Day of the Tentacle and the Monkey Island series. But since many of these were computer games for a niche audience, they disappeared after their initial runs—and if you still have a copy of, say, Sam & Max Hit the Road, getting it to run on a modern machine could prove quite difficult. But not anymore.

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GamerGate is happening because we let it happen

Maybe you’ve heard of GamerGate.

Countless stories have been written about the controversy over the past two months—yes, it started that long ago—in outlets ranging from game-centric titles to our biggest national publications. GamerGate has gone mainstream in a big way, but it remains elusive and difficult to understand. If you’re someone who would like to know just what GamerGate entails, check out this exhaustive piece by Deadspin writer Kyle Wagner. It’s long, but it’s also evenhanded and nuanced. Anyone who tries to break the whole mess down in a bite-sized YouTube video or nifty imgur link is probably trying to mislead you.

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The 'I Am Bread' video game is exactly what you think it is

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One of the best things about video games is how they allow you to experience things from truly unique perspectives—playing characters that come from an entirely different racial, religious, or socioeconomic background as yourself, allowing for deep insight and empathy when done right.

Now, you can also play as a slice of bread.

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Series based on 'Myst' video game enters development

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1993’s Myst was a video game phenomenon. Just read this EW article from October, 1994—even during a time when computer games were very much a sequestered entertainment medium, Myst got mainstream attention more than a year after its release. It was kind of like The Sims of the 90s—everyone had a copy, even if they didn’t know why. At the time, Myst was thought to be the future of storytelling—the beginnings of a bold new form of entertainment. That never really caught on, but much like Twin PeaksMyst is getting another shot.

According to Variety, Legendary Entertainment has just closed a deal with Myst creators Rand and Robyn Miller to turn the game into a new series, either for network or digital. The creators will be involved, and they hope to turn Myst into an immersive transmedia franchise, with a companion game and other apps expanding on the show’s story. Here’s the thing: it could actually work.

While most summaries of Myst will talk about how players take on the role of someone called “The Stranger” and solve puzzles to uncover a world of intrigue, that doesn’t really capture what makes Myst special. Myst was so captivating because it didn’t tell you a thing. You didn’t play as “The Stranger,” you played as yourself—the world was presented to you in the first-person perspective, and didn’t explain a thing to you. You were alone on a strange and beautiful island, and as you wandered around, you’d find strange things: trap doors and diaries and puzzles. Each discovery was more intriguing than the last, and throughout it all, you’d wonder, “Why is this all here?” And eventually, piece by piece, the game would answer your questions.

That sort of experience, where the act of watching and reading and interacting is one of discovery, where you’re presented with a beautiful world that doesn’t explain itself to you but invites you to figure it out—that’s a thing that’s ripe for reinventing from the ground up. And since the Myst games have been dormant since 2005’s Myst V: End of Ages, it stands to reason that those involved aren’t looking to cash in on a hot property, but choosing to adapt a story that has potential to be something new and interesting.

If you want to play Myst, you can get it on just about any platform (including iOS and Android) here.

 

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