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Tag: Entertainment Geekly (1-10 of 93)

Entertainment Geekly: How 'The Walking Dead' is 'Lord of the Rings'

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Robert Kirkman likes to describe The Walking Dead as a zombie movie that never ends. But to my eyes, the most interesting thing about the show is how it’s spent five seasons fluttering between different storytelling modes. The show lacks a single setting and makes a point of killing off at least a couple key cast members every season. This can make The Walking Dead feel unwieldy or unfocused, but it also means that there’s an exciting state of constant flux underpinning the show’s basic head-crushing thrills. I’ve always said that original showrunner Frank Darabont most clearly viewed his version of The Walking Dead as a kind of neo-western, with Sheriff Rick as a clean-cut cowboy wanderer set morally adrift in a new frontier apocalypse. READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: 'Pulp Fiction,' the video store, and the evolution of movie history

My new apartment doesn’t have internet or cable, because I don’t know if I want internet or cable. “Not wanting cable” is so hot right now. This week, CBS and HBO announced their intentions to launch streaming-only services. Pause to imagine your retired grandparents who watch NCIS: New Orleans but prefer NCIS: LA. Now pause to imagine your prodigal-son cousin who stars in a hipster off-Broadway nude-rap opera. (He plays a a cross-dressing hooker named Threeyoncé.) Now pause to imagine that they both suddenly agree on everything—because when the most successful TV network and the TV network so cool that it constantly claims it’s not a TV network both agree that the future is streaming, then “television” as a concept really is just becoming a concept. (Lest we needed further proof: It might feel like Friends is always on TV, but now Friends will literally always be on Netflix.) READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly Mailbag: A serious attempt to explain movies about White Dude Problems

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1999 will always be one of my favorite years for movies. This is partially because there were a lot of great movies released that year, but mainly because in 1999 I was in high school, and as we all know, the world was more important and less terrible when we were in high school. Last week, I took a look at which movies from 1999 had aged well, and asked which had aged poorly. The response was overwhelming, insofar as it’s overwhelming that anyone likes American Beauty.

However, one reader email in particular struck me as a launchpad for an important conversation. Here it is:

Going forward will all movies that have a Caucasian lead in them simply be dismissed as “white dude problems?” Guess I can check off Citizen Kane and North by Northwest from my good movies list.
–Nicholas

READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: Which movie from 1999 has aged most poorly?

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It’s been 15 years since 1999, because that’s how time works. 1999 is generally considered a great year for movies. Transformative, even: A diverse array of films, directed by a fleet of up-and-coming filmmakers, all arriving at the multiplex back when cable was lame enough and the internet was slow enough to make the multiplex a place that mattered.

If you happened to be young in 1999—or young-ish—it was possible to feel like you were seeing the entire cinematic art form evolve in front of you. Fifteen years ago this month was Three Kings and Fight Club and Being John Malkovich, instant-cult films helmed by young/hip directors (all of whom successfully grew into middle-aged/important directors.) They followed The Matrix and Election and The Sixth Sense and The Blair Witch Project; still to come was Dogma and Magnolia. By late November, Entertainment Weekly declared 1999 “The Year That Changed Movies.” READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly Mailbag: Batman talkback!

Big week for Bat-talk! Last week, I published a couple Geekly columns focusing on the Dark Knight Detective. First, I drew up my list of the hundred greatest Batman comics, movies, TV episodes, etc. Then I considered whether it was possible to have entirely too much Batman at one time. And would you believe it, everyone has an opinion about Batman–and a ton of great recommendations! Read on for the highlights. READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: Have we reached Peak Batman?

Fox’s new show Gotham takes place in a miserable world where no one has ever heard of Batman, which makes Gotham somewhat less realistic than Game of Thrones. Two years after the final film in Christopher Nolan’s Dark Knight trifecta, Bruce Wayne’s alter ego is everywhere. In video games, there’s the upcoming Batman: Arkham Knight, the final act of an acclaimed trilogy. In comic books, DC has eight monthly series with the word Batman in the title, and that doesn’t include sundry spinoff titles like Batwoman and Batgirl and Nightwing and Batwing. Hell, even the LEGO Batman is a transmedia superstar: Stealing scenes in The LEGO Movie, headlining a hit videogame franchise. READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: The Batman Top 100

So on Monday, I watched the Gotham series premiere with about 8 million of my friends. I started writing a column about the show and what it says (accidentally and/or purposefully) about the role of Batman in pop culture right now. But working on that column got me thinking more generally about Batman: A character who has been around for 75 years, a figure in my cultural consciousness since before my memory begins. The next thing I knew, I was making a list of my favorite Batman things–the movies, the TV shows, the vividly recalled comic book story arcs and standalone issues, the characters who stand out in my memory as defining aspects of the greater Bat-mythology. READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly Mailbag: 'Smash Brothers' talkback and a 'Big Brother' counter-theory

This is the Entertainment Geekly Mailbag, where I respond to comments, questions, and angry clarifications. (You can email me at darren_franich@ew.com.) This week: Everyone takes issue with my brutally accurate assertion that Kirby is one of the worst players in Super Smash Brothers.

You sir are right on all accounts except one: Kirby. Is. Awesome. And is my go-to character in Smash Bros. If you’d like me to demonstrate why he should be ranked higher on your character list, Ill happily play a round with you ;)
-theatregeek

I would never dream of insulting anyone’s choice of Go-To Character, because that is a deeply personal decision. Like, your Go-To Character is sort of a weird combination of your favorite baseball player, your mascot, your child and your significant other. READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: 'Super Smash Bros.' was the best and worst thing to happen to Nintendo

Destiny is probably the most important videogame I am never going to play. Bungie’s new massively multiplayer space shooting adventure game resulted in the most successful franchise launch of all time, although every official number released by the videogame industry in the last few years has a “juke the stats” uncertainty. My colleagues wrote everything you need to know about Destiny; suffice it to say thatif you always hoped they would remake Halo with more decorative robo-ninja capes, then Destiny is the game for you, weirdo. READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly Mailbag: 'Doctor Who,' 'Big Brother,' and the Apple Watch

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This is the first-ever edition of the Entertainment Geekly Mailbag, where you send questions, aggressive clarifications, or angry rebuttals to me at darren_franich@ew.com, and I attempt to answer those question, declarify those clarifications, and angrily rebut your rebuttal.

Regarding your ‘Doctor Who’ piece
The Doctor is NOT immortal or semi-omniscient.
Time Lords have a limited amount of regenerations and can be killed as the show has stated. The regeneration limit was 12 but he just got a new batch from the Time Lords and it’s not clear how many that was. Maybe a new cycle? But that was presented as a special case. Of course The Doctor will not be killed for the same reason Sherlock Holmes and James Bond would not be killed. :)
As for omniscient, he frequently finds himself at a loss as to what’s going on or what the cause is. He has to work to find out. He is, at core, a very knowledgeable and curious scientist/humanist.
Regards,
Tony
P.S. You didn’t like ‘Hide’? It was one of the highest regarded stories from the last series.

READ FULL STORY

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