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Tag: Comics (1-10 of 12)

Quicksilver from 'X-Men: Days of Future Past' is selling Hardee's now

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The Great Quicksilver Cold War of 2014 continues to heat up hotter than a slab of bacon on a bacon-egg-and-cheese biscuit. While Marvel Studios continues laying the groundwork for the arrival of Aaron Taylor-Johnson’s Quicksilver in next year’s Avengers: Age of Ultron, 20th Century Fox is racing their version of the silver-haired speedster into theaters in X-Men: Days of Future Past.

But you can see Evan Peters’ silver-jacketed mutant right now in a new ad for Hardee’s, where he uses his powers of moving fast to eat fast. Talk about fast food! is not a catchphrase he says out loud, which is really just leaving money on the table if you ask me. Watch below: READ FULL STORY

Lucasfilm, Marvel partner for new 'Star Wars' comics

After more than 20 years, the force is with Marvel once again.

Disney announced Friday that two of its subsidiaries — Lucasfilm and Marvel Entertainment — are working together on a series of new Star Wars comic books.

The brand’s first comics were originally published by Marvel in the ’70s, back before both companies had been acquired by Disney. In 1991, the license for the comics was purchased by Dark Horse, which has published the titles ever since. Now the rights have returned to Marvel, which plans to release its first new-new Star Wars comics and graphic novels in 2015.

Perhaps uncoincidentally, 2015 is also the year that J.J. Abrams’ yet-untitled Star Wars film is scheduled to hit theaters.
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John Lewis' 'MARCH' brings the Civil Rights Movement to life

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The Civil Rights Movement transformed the United States in ways so fundamental it’s difficult for many to conceive that this nation once tolerated, and even encouraged, state-sanctioned discrimination.  Rights that all Americans take for granted were bitterly contested just a few decades ago, and without the courage and fortitude of a handful of individuals American society might be profoundly different. John Robert Lewis was one of those unlikely heroes that fought non-violently to make the United States a more just society.

Congressman Lewis, the former leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, was the youngest speaker at 1963′s March on Washington. Today Lewis, 73, is the elder statesmen of movement, the only person who delivered remarks at the Lincoln Memorial still living. Lewis brings his amazing story to a new generation with the publication of MARCH (Book One) the first part of a trilogy from Top Shelf Productions that will trace Lewis’ life from rural Alabama to the halls of power in Washington D.C.

MARCH, a collaboration between Lewis, longtime aide Andrew Aydin, and illustrator Nate Powell (Swallow Me Whole), follows Lewis from his boyhood as the son of tenant farmers to his participation in Nashville’s successful sit-in campaign to desegregate restaurants and lunch counters. MARCH offers a poignant portrait of an iconic figure that both entertains and edifies, and deserves to be placed alongside other historical graphic memoirs like Persepolis and MAUS.

We sat down with Rep. Lewis and Andrew Aydin to talk about the publication of the book one of MARCH. READ FULL STORY

Peter Parker with a bong? Joe Casey springs 'The Bounce' -- FIRST LOOK

When readers first met young Peter Parker, back in 1962 on the opening page of Amazing Fantasy No. 15, he’s wearing spectacles, carrying schoolbooks and listening too hard to the latest insult.

It’s a little different when readers are greeted by young Jasper Jenkins – the title character of Joe Casey’s The Bounce – in our exclusive preview of the first issue. Instead of eyeglasses, he’s got glassy eyes and the object in his hand looks suspiciously like a three-foot bong. He’s also ignoring the latest lecture. “With great power comes great responsibility” still applies — but in the case of this 21st century slacker soul, it may also be accompanied by metahuman munchies.

NOTE: The preview pages below contain R-rated language and drug use. READ FULL STORY

FIRST LOOK: Neil Gaiman's avenging Angela will make Marvel history

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Her name is Angela and she’s a bounty hunter on a mission from God — and heaven help any Marvel character who’s not on the side of the angels.

The image above, by fan-favorite artist Joe Quesada (who “moonlights” as Marvel Chief Creative Officer) is the first look at the scantily clad celestial agent who will make her Marvel debut in the 10th and final issue of Age of Ultron – but many longtime comics fans already know the name (and that barely-there outfit) from her past life beyond the Marvel multiverse. READ FULL STORY

Wonder Woman: 10 super sexist moments from her vintage comics

Wonder Woman arrived on newsstands in December 1941 with a secret mission from her creator, William Moulton Marston: represent “psychological propaganda for the new type of woman who should, I believe, rule the world,” as Marston himself put it.

Marston believed women to be inherently superior to men and his Amazon creation lived up to that view — but not for very long. Marston moved on and his creation quickly became a symbol for numbing sexism in a puerile forum – a woman in hot pants written and drawn by men for a medium aimed at boys.

The contradictions of the character are at the core of Wonder Women! The Untold Stories of American Superheroines, which is airing this week on PBS. EW talked recently with one of the filmmakers behind the documentary, Kristy Guevara-Flanagan, and with her help, we went back through vintage Wonder Woman comics and found 10 jaw-dropping moments of surreal sexism. Here’s how we would describe each of them if we were caught in the golden loops of Wonder Woman’s lasso of truth.

All-Star Comics No. 12, 1942: The mighty Wonder Woman is invited to join the Justice Society… as the club secretary. She accepts, and Hawkman, Dr. Mid-Nite and the guys serenade her with “For she’s a jolly good fellow…” How thoughtful. Later the mightiest Amazon dutifully waits behind while the men go off to fight. Those men include Al Pratt, a.k.a. the Atom, a 5-foot-1 tough guy who has no superpowers and wears a weightlifting belt as part of his costume. READ FULL STORY

Han Solo as a lizard? The inside scoop on 'The Star Wars' from Dark Horse

The Jedi universe wasn’t built in a day and the construction process had some strange stages. If you thumb through the 1974 draft of the George Lucas script for The Star Wars (as it was called then) you’ll see a funhouse version of the most famous space epic that includes a warrior named Starkiller and a reptilian alien named Han Solo.

That version of Star Wars has been a relatively obscure artifact, but now it will get a spotlight of its own in a major adaptation by Dark Horse Comics that maps out a tale that’s both familiar and totally alien.

For the Oregon-based comics company, the project may be the great farewell to the Jedi mythology. Star Wars comics have been a core part of the Dark Horse’s indie publishing empire since the early 1990s. Now, after the Disney purchase of Lucasfilm, Dark Horse is likely to lose the license in the months ahead. We caught up with Mike Richardson, founder of Dark Horse, and Randy Stradley, the Dark Horse editor who has been the architect of the brand’s Dark Horse success, to talk about rediscovered universes and losing Empires. READ FULL STORY

Wonder Woman's invisible jet still off Hollywood's radar

Maybe it’s the invisible jet? Wonder Woman has been soaring as a pop culture icon since the Roosevelt era but she can’t get on Hollywood’s radar when it comes to a solo silver-screen adventure. This summer’s Man of Steel gives Superman his eighth feature film (tying him with Batman) but Wonder Woman is stuck at zero and at this point her best IMDB prospect is a gal-pal supporting role in the shaky-sounding Justice League movie.

We took the topic to filmmaker Kristy Guevara-Flanagan (Going on 13) whose documentary Wonder Women! The Untold Story of American Superheroines is airing next week on PBS and has been the subject of community screenings around the country.

Entertainment Weekly: Superman and Batman will have 16 movies between them by the end of this summer and Wonder Woman can’t lasso a movie deal. The Losers, Elektra and Howard the Duck reached the big screen, how come Diana Prince doesn’t rate?

Kristy Guevara-Flanagan: Hollywood seems to be hesitant to bank on a movie with a woman as the lead. Hopefully something like Hunger Games will change the perception that movies about women don’t make money. There’s also a challenge find a director that will be true to the material but still bring it to life in a way that will appeal to a broad audience. Joss Whedon did a good job with that on The Avengers. Since a lot of people have a hard time defining who Wonder Woman is beyond the costume — that presents a challenge.

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'Avengers: Endless Wartime': Marvel's new graphic novel era begins -- EXCLUSIVE

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Marvel will start a new shelf of original graphic novels this October with the release of Avengers: Endless Wartime, a 110-page epic by writer Warren Ellis and artist Mark McKone that will represent a number of milestone firsts.

Endless Wartime will be the first Marvel title released simultaneously in North America, Italy, Spain, Germany, France, Brazil, Finland and Turkey. The book includes a code for accessing a digital edition via the Marvel Comics app and online in the Marvel Digital Comics Shop. The book’s biggest distinction, however, is the somewhat odd fact that Marvel rarely publishes major original graphic novels — more on that in a moment. But first a quick observation on Ellis: The man who dreamed up Spider Jerusalem and Planetary is putting together a pretty special year.

The Brit’s second prose detective novel, Gun Machine, hit the New York Times Bestseller list in January and his comics work will echo in two major studio releases this summer. There’s Iron Man 3 (which draws core concepts and themes from Iron Man: Extremis, the landmark 2005 story arc that pruned and primed the character’s mythology for Hollywood) and then RED 2 (the sequel to 2010′s RED, which gets its spy-versus-spy-retiree concept and its title from the old Wildstorm limited series by Ellis and Cully Hamner).

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'The Guardian' presents the election, in awesome graphic novel form

Love politics, but hate having to wade through piles of boring text to get the information you crave? The Guardian has the solution: a virtual graphic novel that perfectly summarizes the 2012 presidential election.

This piece has everything — a timeline of events stretching back to the 2008 Republican primaries, cartoons that expertly convey Obama’s weariness, Romney’s determination, and Rick Santorum’s innate goofiness, and nifty little animations that are activated by a simple downward scroll. Perhaps the best part: “Texts from Hillary” makes an appearance. Really, just stop reading this and scroll through the whole thing.

Leave it to the American wing of a British company to come up with the coolest thing we’ve seen this election cycle. Is it too late to lobby for the U.S. to rejoin the U.K.?

Read more:
Vote! Google’s new Doodle wants you to
Celebrities rock the vote, urge you to do the same via Twitter
‘South Park’ makes bold election prediction with Wednesday’s ep, titled ‘Obama Wins!’

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