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Tag: Comics (1-10 of 29)

See Marvel's latest mystery teaser, 'Inhumans: Attilan Rising'

As you may have read earlier this week, something weird is going on at Marvel. The comic book publisher has been releasing a steady trickle of cryptic teasers alluding to previous stories, all hinting at a Summer 2015 date. Today, EW has an exclusive on the latest teaser, Inhumans: Attilan Rising. 

This one is pretty different from the other teasers released so far—Attilan Rising is the name of an entirely new story set in current continuity, not a classic one. It alludes to the end of Infinity, last year’s big Avengers crossover. In Infinity, Attilan, the floating throne-city of the Inhumans, was destroyed and crashed to the planet Earth, with the Inhuman king Black Bolt MIA in the fallout. Attilan Rising, then, looks like Black Bolt is poised to rebuild his his fallen kingdom—over the bodies of the current X-Men and the All-New Avengers.

Marvel remains tight-lipped about their end game with all these teasers, but does confirm that they are building to a reveal that promises to make everything clear.

What is going on at Marvel? A PopWatch conspiracy theory

If you follow comic book news, you might’ve noticed something happening over at Marvel. You haven’t? Let’s review. There’s this: READ FULL STORY

The race for 'The Black Vortex': Marvel Comics' next Guardians/X-Men event

This February, the Guardians of the Galaxy and the X-Men will be teaming up in Guardians of the Galaxy/X-Men: The Black Vortex, a cosmic comic-book adventure that will send the two teams into the far reaches of space on the hunt for The Black Vortex, an object of immense power.

So what is The Black Vortex? According to Sam Humphries, the crossover’s lead writer speaking in advance of his panel today at New York Comic Con, it is an immensely powerful object with the ability to unlock the cosmic potential that lies within anyone. “So if you play guitar,” says Humphries, “The Black Vortex can unlock the potential within you to play like Jimmy Page, and Jimmy Hendrix, and George Harrison all at the same time.” READ FULL STORY

Go big or go home: Why Marvel's new 'Secret Wars' could be too much

For comic book fans of a certain age, few comic book stories are remembered as fondly as Marvel’s 1984 mega-hit Secret Wars. A yearlong series that birthed countless Marvel fans, Secret Wars was memorable, even if the story—standard rock ‘em, sock ‘em stuff—doesn’t hold up. Now, thirty years later, Secret Wars is happening again.

The news was announced Thursday night at the Avengers S.T.A.T.I.O.N. exhibit in Times Square at New York Comic-Con. Marvel exec Dan Buckley only had the scantest of details to share: the event will be written by Jonathan Hickman as part of the multi-year saga he’s been writing in the pages of Avengers and New Avengers since he relaunched the titles in 2012. The event will be drawn by Esad Ribic, who just wrapped up an absolutely classic run on Thor: God of Thunder,  and will begin in May 2015. READ FULL STORY

Exactly how much did Calvin and Hobbes' shenanigans cost his parents?

It’s no secret that kids have a tendency to drain their parents’ bank accounts. And a particularly mischievous youngster like Calvin from Calvin And Hobbes—the syndicated daily comic strip by Bill Watterson that ran from 1985 to 1995—can rack up quite the bill. Just how much? Matt J. Michel, editor of the part-serious, part-satirical science journal Proceedings of the Natural Institute of Science (PNIS), conducted some pretty legit research to estimate how much monetary damage Calvin and his partner in crime/tiger friend Hobbes did throughout the comic strip’s lifetime. His expert conclusion: $15,955.50, which works out to $1,850 per year.

Michel was as serious and meticulous in his not-so-groundbreaking work as a NASA scientist. His fastidious methodology included documenting each instance of property damage, and then calculating the expenses using the regional labor and material costs of Watterson’s hometown, Chagrin Falls, Ohio. (Exhibit A: Calvin caused five house-flooding incidents at expense of $4,798.83 each.) As for the value of the items Calvin destroyed over the years, Michel sourced his pricing from Amazon, save for Calvin’s mother’s sweater—which he deemed high quality enough to use J. Crew as his benchmark. In the spirit of academic legitimacy, Michel did not include incidents that were merely mentioned in the comics, but not explained, in his data set. (Remember that mysterious “noodle incident”?)

Michel concludes with a half-horrifying, half-heartwarming note:

“If your little bundle of joy grows up to be a Tasmanian devil of terror, you can expect to pay almost two grand extra per year just in replacing or repairing items… In parenting, you have to take the bad with the good. With a kid like Calvin, it’s probably mostly bad. But even raising a Calvin has its good moments (like here), which are well worth the extra $1,850 a year.”

cost-of-calvin.jpg

 

Shake, don't stir: James Bond comics are coming in 2015

The next James Bond movie taking too long to come out? How about some 007 comics to tide you over?

On Tuesday, comic book publisher Dynamite Entertainment announced a partnership with the estate of Ian Fleming that will give Dynamite worldwide rights to publish comic books featuring suave superspy James Bond. According to The Hollywood Reporter, the deal allows for both adaptations of existing 007 stories and entirely new adventures—in fact, Dynamite’s first Bond project will be set before Casino Royale and document Bond’s earliest years.

No creative teams have been announced yet, but with New York Comic-Con just a couple of days away it’s hard to imagine the team working on the first Bond books will stay secret much longer. Now, the big question: what will this Bond look like? Will they go full Connery? Half Craig? Or totally Moore?

Even better: What if they make him Idris Elba

 

See the first 6 pages of the new 'Sleepy Hollow' comic book series

Few recent TV shows have inspired as much Tumblr meme-crafting, hardcore shipping, and hashtag-trending fandom as Sleepy Hollow, which just returned to kick off its second season a few weeks back. The show is one of the most unique on television, as it is part cop procedural, part demon-hunting fantasy, and part fish-out-of-water comedy—the latter driven by time-traveling American Revolutionary Ichabod Crane.

Sleepy Hollow has built up that deep-diving level of devotion by crafting a totally unique world, so it’s no wonder that people have sought to tell other stories within that universe that go beyond the weekly adventures on the TV show. The first of an expected cavalcade of tie-in novels is already available, and now comes a monthly comic book series from Boom! Studios, the same publisher responsible for the Big Trouble In Little China books (among many awesome others).  READ FULL STORY

Professor X sure is a whiner in this X-Men supercut

Professor-X-SUPERCUT.jpg

In the comic books, Professor Charles Xavier, founder of the X-Men, is the world’s most powerful telepath, able to read minds and control them at will, among other things. This is an absolutely terrifying set of powers, one that would make him a formidable opponent even without the use of his legs.

But if you knew the character from the long-running X-Men animated series, you’d probably think his powers included far less threatening abilities, like superhuman migraines or the power to send his ridiculous floating wheelchair flying away from him.

Seriously. Just watch this supercut. He really should’ve put a seatbelt in that thing.

READ FULL STORY

Why Kirby v. Marvel mattered

In 2014, it’s quite common to know almost every detail behind the production of a superhero movie before the movie is even released. From the release date to the cast to the director to screenwriters, every detail is examined and disseminated across myriad blogs and social media sites, to the point where, if you’re even mildly interested, you could easily find out the names of those responsible for getting that film to your local cinema.

But how about the people who created the characters in the pages of comic books?

In the early days of comic books, the relationship between creators and publishers was often exploitative. Many of the people responsible for creating the heroes that would make publishers millions were freelancers, working from home, never making a regular salary outside of their normal page rates and often struggling to get back their original artwork, collect royalties, or even get the level of credit due to them. People create pop culture, not corporations.

Of all those people, few have gotten the short shrift like Jacob Kurtzberg, better known as Jack Kirby.

READ FULL STORY

A look inside Nigeria's very own Comic-Con

Avengers-Age-of-Ultron-Vedova-Nera-Teaser-Poster

Comic books have some of the most active and involved fans of any medium, and comics conventions are a big part of that. Despite the immense popularity of comics-inspired movies in theaters every year, the majority of published comics don’t sell very many copies—the average number of copies a book at both Marvel and DC, the biggest names in the business, tends to sit at 50,000 or less, with the top 10 clocking in six figures and the rest less than half that. Because of this, comics heavily rely on the support of a small and passionate fanbase. Comic cons are an important part of the industry, and they just don’t happen in San Diego and New York.

Case in point: Nigeria’s Lagos Comic-Con. READ FULL STORY

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