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Tag: Comic Books (21-30 of 397)

Marvel introduces Muslim superhero in 'Ms. Marvel #1'

Someone’s creating a new superhero, which means it must be a day of the week ending in “y.” But Marvel Comics’ announcement about a new Ms. Marvel series deserves special attention. The company announced in a press release today that the new Ms. Marvel will be a superhero of the Islamic faith — the first-ever Muslim title character from Marvel Comics and pretty much the first Muslim superhero from the mainstream comic publishers to get her own monthly book. (Although last year DC introduced Simon Baz, a new Green Lantern who’s currently a member of the Justice League.)
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'Batman' TV prequel: What we can expect from 'Gotham'

Fox chose an auspicious moment to greenlight a Batman prequel show. The same day the network announced Gotham, eternal rival Marvel saw its multi-punctuated Avengers spin-off Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. deliver a dominant series-premiere ratings performance. S.H.I.E.L.D.‘s success is proof-of-concept for a new Superhero-Adjacent genre: A show set in a familiar super-universe that focuses on the less-super (and decidedly cheaper) heroes.

Gotham is superficially similar. Like S.H.I.E.L.D., it transforms a supporting character into the lead: The show will apparently constitute an origin story for Commissioner Gordon, the chief lawman and Friend-of-Batman played by Gary Oldman in the Dark Knight trilogy. But it also appears that Gotham will prominently feature other characters from the comic book mythos. Fox has indicated that iconic villains will also appear, in some kind of fetal prequel form. Expect to learn more about the show in tantalizing tidbits released in regularly Internet-imploding news releases over the next few months, but here are five talking points about Gotham:
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'Batwoman' writers exit, claiming DC scotched plans for groundbreaking lesbian marriage

DC’s Batwoman is a standout series in the company’s lineup, the rare mainstream comic with a lesbian lead character. In fact, Batwoman got engaged a few months ago to longtime girlfriend/fellow badass Maggie Sawyer. Unfortunately, plans for a historic marriage have been discarded — and, as a result, the book’s main architects have now departed the series.

In a blog post, co-writers J.H. Williams III and W. Haden Blackman explain that they will leave Batwoman after issue #26. “In recent months, DC has asked us to alter or completely discard many long-standing storylines in ways that we feel compromise the character and the series,” they explain, noting that the most crushing alteration was that they were “prohibited from ever showing Kate and Maggie actually getting married.”
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John Lewis' 'MARCH' brings the Civil Rights Movement to life

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The Civil Rights Movement transformed the United States in ways so fundamental it’s difficult for many to conceive that this nation once tolerated, and even encouraged, state-sanctioned discrimination.  Rights that all Americans take for granted were bitterly contested just a few decades ago, and without the courage and fortitude of a handful of individuals American society might be profoundly different. John Robert Lewis was one of those unlikely heroes that fought non-violently to make the United States a more just society.

Congressman Lewis, the former leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, was the youngest speaker at 1963’s March on Washington. Today Lewis, 73, is the elder statesmen of movement, the only person who delivered remarks at the Lincoln Memorial still living. Lewis brings his amazing story to a new generation with the publication of MARCH (Book One) the first part of a trilogy from Top Shelf Productions that will trace Lewis’ life from rural Alabama to the halls of power in Washington D.C.

MARCH, a collaboration between Lewis, longtime aide Andrew Aydin, and illustrator Nate Powell (Swallow Me Whole), follows Lewis from his boyhood as the son of tenant farmers to his participation in Nashville’s successful sit-in campaign to desegregate restaurants and lunch counters. MARCH offers a poignant portrait of an iconic figure that both entertains and edifies, and deserves to be placed alongside other historical graphic memoirs like Persepolis and MAUS.

We sat down with Rep. Lewis and Andrew Aydin to talk about the publication of the book one of MARCH. READ FULL STORY

Comic-Con: 'Ben 10' creators reflect on 25 years of San Diego's 'pop-culture tsunami'

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Comic-Con was really created for artists like the quartet at Man of Action Studios. Joe Casey, Joe Kelly, Duncan Rouleau, and Steven T. Seagle are accomplished storytellers who’ve conquered the world of comic books and television animation. They’ve written and drawn Superman, X-Men, and Spider-Man, while developing their own original characters and projects — like Ben 10, the popular animated-TV franchise on Cartoon Network. They have their own imprint at Image Comics, but they’re also cozy with Marvel, with whom they are collaborating on the Ultimate Spider-Man and Avengers Assemble Disney XD animated shows.

Not surprisingly, this year’s Con will not be their first. Members of the gang have been making their annual pilgrimage to San Diego for the past 25 years. And even though they are now Comic-Con stars, prime attractions shopping their wares, they’re still fans at heart. Casey, Seagle, and Rouleau took some time to write about what Comic-Con means to them.
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Alyssa Milano weaves a tangled web in 'Hacktivist,' a new graphic novel -- EXCLUSIVE

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Alyssa Milano wears many hats. She’s a cheating wife, a witch, the Boss (arguably)… and a comic-book writer.

Milano has collaborated with writers Jackson Lanzing and Collin Kelly, artist Marcus To, colorist Ian Herring, and letterer Deron Bennett to create a new graphic novel called Hacktivist, a “fast-paced cyber-thriller” that follows a pair of Silicon Valley wunderkinds who lead a secret double life. By day, Ed Hiccox and Nate Graft are the founders of an innovative social media company; by night, they’re a notorious team of hackers.

“I’m very involved with in global activism and philanthropy. I like the idea of everyday people doing good,” Milano explains in a statement. “My inspiration for Hacktivist is actually Jack Dorsey, the creator of Twitter and Square. I picture him leaving the office at night and going home, where he locks himself in his room and starts hacking to change the world.”

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Comic-Con 2013 preview: Five comics to watch

We’re mere days away from the official launch date of annual pop culture festival Comic-Con. And while we’re all busy buzzing over the movies and TV shows that will soon colonize your Twitter feed, it’s important not to forget the “Comic” part of Comic-Con. The major comics publishers will all be in attendance, showing off teases for upcoming books and new crossovers — here are the five comics we’re excited to learn more about in San Diego.
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Alan Moore: 'League of Extraordinary Gentlemen' show is 'dustbin' hunting

There have been 33 feature films based on DC Comics since 1951, yet the Hollywood history of DC has been largely limited to a trio of characters too vivid to exist in the real world: Batman, Superman, and Alan Moore.

The first two everyone knows. The third is a British writer who, while not technically a fictional character, is absolutely a character of the highest order. But in what way does he rank with the caped legends? Four of Moore’s brilliant comic book epics have been adapted by Hollywood: Watchmen, V for Vendetta, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, and From Hell. A fifth film, Constantine, was based on a character he created, and a sixth, Return of the Swamp Thing, was propelled by his landmark three-year work on bog monster’s series.

Those individual movies range from underrated and okay (Watchmen, Constantine) to overcooked and odious (League of Extraordinary Gentlemen). But collectively, they put Moore’s bookshelf not far behind Gotham City lore (nine Batman movies plus the stray spinoff Catwoman) and Metropolis mythology (the seventh Superman film is now in theaters, plus Supergirl and Steel, which were as bizarro-stupid as they sound.)

Moore lives in Northampton,  England, the same place he was born 59 years ago. Since then, he’s covered a lot of territory, and not just in this dimension. Moore’s interesting look — a bushy prophet beard, a menacing sorcerer’s glare, and metallic talons on his fingers — fit a guy who identified himself as an anarchist and (with a wink) a worshiper of Glycon, the 2nd Century snake god. But even with all that, it was only after Moore refused to cash his Hollywood paychecks that his industry peers began to wonder about his grip.

Moore is no forest hermit despite some past press portrayals, but he does live off the grid if your definition of “basic shelter” includes wi-fi coverage. “I have very few connections with the 21st century, actually,” Moore said last week over the most modern of connections: a landline telephone with a curly cord stretching all the way to the 20th century.

The line was busy the first couple times I dialed, but Moore picked up on my third try and I found (just like the first time I interviewed him, back in 2008) that there was far more mischief in his voice than malice, even when he took shots at DC Comics and Hollywood, which he sees as factories that grind art (and artists) into pulp that can be sold, recycled, and then sold again in new shapes.

The topic is timely: Moore’s name was in Hollywood headlines last week when reports surfaced that Fox has ordered up a League of Extraordinary Gentleman television pilot with hopes that a savvy small-screen take on the material could right the many wrongs made by director Stephen Norrington’s 2003 film (which notoriously drove star Sean Connery into retirement). [Read Owen Gleiberman's review here.]

That same television do-over approach worked for Fox with Buffy the Vampire Slayer, but that series had the character’s creator, Joss Whedon, on board to show the way. Moore laughed when asked if he or League artist and co-creator Kevin O’Neill would be involved in any way with the broadcast venture.

NEXT: “It seems they are recycling things that have already proven not to work.”

Comic-Con: Wolverine + bunny cuteness? Some wounds don't heal

“You had to be there.” A droll expression in most settings but not at Comic-Con International  where good things (namely “exclusives,” the one-time-only collectibles sold at the pop culture expo) come to those who wait in lines that seem to stretch to the Orange County line. Here’s a first look at some of this year’s San Diego exclusives…

Why look it’s…um, it’s a Wolverine…bunny-like…item?

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'Inhuman': EW Exclusive! Check out Joe Madureira's cover for Marvel's radical new comic book

Yesterday, EW exclusively revealed the gamechanging Marvel event “Inhumanity,” wherein the mystical power-granting substance known as the Terrigen Mists is released around the world, creating a massive number of newly-superpowered individuals. Today, we’re excited to share the cover for Inhuman, the new regular comic book which launches at the end of 2013 written by Matt Fraction (Hawkeye) and drawn by Joe Madureira, currently working on Savage Wolverine and known for a legendary ’90s run on Uncanny X-Men. READ FULL STORY

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