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Tag: Comic Books (21-30 of 384)

Peter Parker with a bong? Joe Casey springs 'The Bounce' -- FIRST LOOK

When readers first met young Peter Parker, back in 1962 on the opening page of Amazing Fantasy No. 15, he’s wearing spectacles, carrying schoolbooks and listening too hard to the latest insult.

It’s a little different when readers are greeted by young Jasper Jenkins – the title character of Joe Casey’s The Bounce – in our exclusive preview of the first issue. Instead of eyeglasses, he’s got glassy eyes and the object in his hand looks suspiciously like a three-foot bong. He’s also ignoring the latest lecture. “With great power comes great responsibility” still applies — but in the case of this 21st century slacker soul, it may also be accompanied by metahuman munchies.

NOTE: The preview pages below contain R-rated language and drug use. READ FULL STORY

FIRST LOOK: Neil Gaiman's avenging Angela will make Marvel history

Angela

Her name is Angela and she’s a bounty hunter on a mission from God — and heaven help any Marvel character who’s not on the side of the angels.

The image above, by fan-favorite artist Joe Quesada (who “moonlights” as Marvel Chief Creative Officer) is the first look at the scantily clad celestial agent who will make her Marvel debut in the 10th and final issue of Age of Ultron – but many longtime comics fans already know the name (and that barely-there outfit) from her past life beyond the Marvel multiverse. READ FULL STORY

This Week's Cover: Behind the soulful new 'Man of Steel'

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The makers of Man of Steel had to start thinking like a cadre of supervillains: how do you get under Superman’s invincible skin and really make him hurt?

This week’s cover story reveals how the new film (out June 14) attempts to humanize the superhuman by finding new flaws and vulnerabilities. The most common one, however, was off the table: “I’ll be honest with you, there’s no Kryptonite in the movie,” says director Zack Snyder (300, Watchmen) Those glowing green space rocks – Superman’s only crippling weakness – have turned up so often as a plot point in movies, the only fresh option was not to use it. Anyway, if you want to make an audience relate to a character, a galactic allergy isn’t the way to do it.

Henry Cavill (Immortals), the latest star to wear the red cape, instead plays a Superman who isn’t fully comfortable with that god-like title. This film reveals that even on Krypton, young Kal-El was a special child, whose birth was cause for alarm on his home planet. (More on that in the magazine) And once on Earth, his adoptive parents, Ma and Pa Kent (Kevin Costner and Diane Lane), urge him not to use his immense strength – even in dire emergencies — warning that not every human would be as accepting of him as they are. So Clark Kent grows up feeling isolated, longing for a connection to others, and constantly hiding who he is. As a result, Man of Steel presents the frustrated Superman, the angry Superman, the lost Superman. “Although he is not susceptible to the frailties of mankind, he is definitely susceptible to the emotional frailties,” Cavill says.

That’s just the set-up. Once the Kryptonian villain General Zod (Boardwalk Empire’s Michael Shannon) arrives to threaten the Earth, eventually the passionate Superman steps forward, too. It helps that he has a reason to care about the home he’s defending, and we can all thank Amy Adams’ Lois Lane for that. “I think she’s very transient. She’s ready to pick up and go at a moment’s notice,” Adams says of the hard-bitten journalist. “I think that definitely could be part of what she sees in Superman — not really laying down roots, not developing trust.”

Based on footage EW has seen, the film (which was directed by Zack Snyder and shepherded by Christopher Nolan) has plenty of building-smashing, train-slinging, heat-vision-blasting battles to cut through the emotional heaviness. “You want to give the audience great spectacle. You want them to go to the movie, be eating their popcorn and be like, ‘Wow!’” says Man of Steel producer Charles Roven, who also worked on The Dark Knight trilogy. “But it’s just not good enough to give them the ‘Wow.’ You want them to be emotionally engaged. Because if you just have the ‘wow,’ ultimately you get bludgeoned by that and you stop caring.”

Those who’ve long felt the super-confident, super-controlled Superman has gotten super dull may be glad to see him finally challenged in ways that go beyond bullets bouncing off of his chest.

inthisissue0410For more on Man of Steel and 108 other summer movies — including Johnny Depp’s views on playing The Lone Ranger‘s Tonto (“He’s damaged. He’s just looking to get back on track”), Jennifer Aniston’s prep work for the comedy We’re the Millers (“This fabulous dance instructor just pulled the inner stripper out of me,”), and Sandra Bullock’s first impressions of working with Melissa McCarthy and director Paul Feig on The Heat (“The first week I was like, ‘What the hell is going on here?’”)  — pick up the new issue of Entertainment Weekly, on stands April 12th.

Wonder Woman: 10 super sexist moments from her vintage comics

Wonder Woman arrived on newsstands in December 1941 with a secret mission from her creator, William Moulton Marston: represent “psychological propaganda for the new type of woman who should, I believe, rule the world,” as Marston himself put it.

Marston believed women to be inherently superior to men and his Amazon creation lived up to that view — but not for very long. Marston moved on and his creation quickly became a symbol for numbing sexism in a puerile forum – a woman in hot pants written and drawn by men for a medium aimed at boys.

The contradictions of the character are at the core of Wonder Women! The Untold Stories of American Superheroines, which is airing this week on PBS. EW talked recently with one of the filmmakers behind the documentary, Kristy Guevara-Flanagan, and with her help, we went back through vintage Wonder Woman comics and found 10 jaw-dropping moments of surreal sexism. Here’s how we would describe each of them if we were caught in the golden loops of Wonder Woman’s lasso of truth.

All-Star Comics No. 12, 1942: The mighty Wonder Woman is invited to join the Justice Society… as the club secretary. She accepts, and Hawkman, Dr. Mid-Nite and the guys serenade her with “For she’s a jolly good fellow…” How thoughtful. Later the mightiest Amazon dutifully waits behind while the men go off to fight. Those men include Al Pratt, a.k.a. the Atom, a 5-foot-1 tough guy who has no superpowers and wears a weightlifting belt as part of his costume. READ FULL STORY

Han Solo as a lizard? The inside scoop on 'The Star Wars' from Dark Horse

The Jedi universe wasn’t built in a day and the construction process had some strange stages. If you thumb through the 1974 draft of the George Lucas script for The Star Wars (as it was called then) you’ll see a funhouse version of the most famous space epic that includes a warrior named Starkiller and a reptilian alien named Han Solo.

That version of Star Wars has been a relatively obscure artifact, but now it will get a spotlight of its own in a major adaptation by Dark Horse Comics that maps out a tale that’s both familiar and totally alien.

For the Oregon-based comics company, the project may be the great farewell to the Jedi mythology. Star Wars comics have been a core part of the Dark Horse’s indie publishing empire since the early 1990s. Now, after the Disney purchase of Lucasfilm, Dark Horse is likely to lose the license in the months ahead. We caught up with Mike Richardson, founder of Dark Horse, and Randy Stradley, the Dark Horse editor who has been the architect of the brand’s Dark Horse success, to talk about rediscovered universes and losing Empires. READ FULL STORY

Wonder Woman's invisible jet still off Hollywood's radar

Maybe it’s the invisible jet? Wonder Woman has been soaring as a pop culture icon since the Roosevelt era but she can’t get on Hollywood’s radar when it comes to a solo silver-screen adventure. This summer’s Man of Steel gives Superman his eighth feature film (tying him with Batman) but Wonder Woman is stuck at zero and at this point her best IMDB prospect is a gal-pal supporting role in the shaky-sounding Justice League movie.

We took the topic to filmmaker Kristy Guevara-Flanagan (Going on 13) whose documentary Wonder Women! The Untold Story of American Superheroines is airing next week on PBS and has been the subject of community screenings around the country.

Entertainment Weekly: Superman and Batman will have 16 movies between them by the end of this summer and Wonder Woman can’t lasso a movie deal. The Losers, Elektra and Howard the Duck reached the big screen, how come Diana Prince doesn’t rate?

Kristy Guevara-Flanagan: Hollywood seems to be hesitant to bank on a movie with a woman as the lead. Hopefully something like Hunger Games will change the perception that movies about women don’t make money. There’s also a challenge find a director that will be true to the material but still bring it to life in a way that will appeal to a broad audience. Joss Whedon did a good job with that on The Avengers. Since a lot of people have a hard time defining who Wonder Woman is beyond the costume — that presents a challenge.

READ FULL STORY

'Avengers: Endless Wartime': Marvel's new graphic novel era begins -- EXCLUSIVE

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Marvel will start a new shelf of original graphic novels this October with the release of Avengers: Endless Wartime, a 110-page epic by writer Warren Ellis and artist Mark McKone that will represent a number of milestone firsts.

Endless Wartime will be the first Marvel title released simultaneously in North America, Italy, Spain, Germany, France, Brazil, Finland and Turkey. The book includes a code for accessing a digital edition via the Marvel Comics app and online in the Marvel Digital Comics Shop. The book’s biggest distinction, however, is the somewhat odd fact that Marvel rarely publishes major original graphic novels — more on that in a moment. But first a quick observation on Ellis: The man who dreamed up Spider Jerusalem and Planetary is putting together a pretty special year.

The Brit’s second prose detective novel, Gun Machine, hit the New York Times Bestseller list in January and his comics work will echo in two major studio releases this summer. There’s Iron Man 3 (which draws core concepts and themes from Iron Man: Extremis, the landmark 2005 story arc that pruned and primed the character’s mythology for Hollywood) and then RED 2 (the sequel to 2010′s RED, which gets its spy-versus-spy-retiree concept and its title from the old Wildstorm limited series by Ellis and Cully Hamner).

READ FULL STORY

TNA wrestler Christopher Daniels pins down the comics and wrestling connection

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Fans of wrestling nationwide will have the pay-per-view pleasure tonight of watching Lockdown 2013, the latest crafted conflict from TNA Wrestling (and no, we looked it up, it actually stands for Total Non-stop Action). One of the big moments will be the tag-team title match, which will feature the preening Christopher Daniels and his partner, Kazarian, as they take on two other brawny, bellowing tandems.

At some point Daniels, a 43-year-old native of Kalamazoo, Mich., will likely strike a pose that he picked up in the Marvel Universe or in baneful Gotham City — that’s because the Lex Luthor look-a-like is a devoted fan of comics who has even entered the ring dressed as Magneto, the Marvel’s mutant master of magnetism. What are the ties that bind comics to wrestling? We asked the black-hat ringmaster to pin it all down for us.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: Wrestlers seem to have a lot in common with comic book characters — they fly through the air, they make a lot of fans and enemies, the whole thing with tights. Do you think comics were a compass that pointed you toward your destiny? READ FULL STORY

ComiXology launches new portal for indie artists: EW's exclusive talk with artist Becky Cloonan -- IMAGE

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Long ago, making it in the comic book industry used to be a relatively straightforward proposition: You work for Marvel, you work for DC, or you don’t work at all. But the rise of the indie comics movement has given more opportunities to comic book creators. Now, digital-comics platform comiXology is announcing a new portal called comiXology Submit, which aims to indie artists’ stories available on a wide variety of devices: iPad, iPhone, Android, Kindle Fire, and Windows 8 apps. Submit, which was announced at SXSW, allows anyone to submit their work for approval at the comiXology website. (Creators split the profits equally with comiXology and retain full ownership of their work.)

For the launch, comiXology got 34 indie comic creators to contribute material. Entertainment Weekly spoke to one of the artists, Becky Cloonan, an Eisner Award nominee who last year became the first female artist to illustrate the main Batman title. (You can also scroll down for a first look at Cloonan’s contribution to comiXology Submit, Demeter.) READ FULL STORY

'Guardians of the Galaxy': To Infinite and beyond -- EXCLUSIVE PHOTOS

In the search for universal insight, we bring you two cosmic questions from the Marvel Universe: Will moviegoers embrace the unknown next summer when Marvel Studios delivers the eccentric Guardians of the Galaxy film? And, in the uncharted frontier of digital comics, how far can Marvel’s Infinite Comics go with its ongoing mission to find new readers?

Time will answer those shrouded mysteries, but there may be hints to both in a new release that arrives today in the Marvel digital space: Guardians of the Galaxy Infinite Comics, the first in a special four-issue series (written by Brian Michael Bendis and posted bi-weekly — you’ll find exclusive looks at the art above and below) in the Infinite format.

READ FULL STORY

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