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Tag: Comedy (71-80 of 362)

Check out 10 now-famous comedians in their early days of stand-up

Patton Oswalt posted a clip on Twitter of his first acting gig at the tender age of 19. The seasoned actor-comedian may not totally appreciate the look back at his performing roots — a faux stand-up routine that doubles as an educational video on college loans — but fans and viewers are sure to be amused by not just the look back at the then-baby-faced Oswalt but also the totally outrageous early 90s fashion. Every comedian started somewhere — often on a dark stage in awesomely dated clothes.

Watch his set below and check out the stand-up routines (and the fashions!) from some of your favorite comedians. (Some  videos may be NSFW due to explicit language.) READ FULL STORY

Dane Cook announces new 'Under Oath' tour: 'Let there be hate'

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Guess who’s back?

Four years after taking the country by storm with his last major tour2009’s “ISolated INcident”Dane Cook is preparing to hit the road again this fall. He’s calling his latest venture “Under Oath,” a loaded name that wasn’t chosen lightly. “As a comedian, I am obligated to tell you the truth, my truth,” he explained to EW in an exclusive interview. “To share with you my beliefs, my perspective. And I think that we forget sometimes that that’s the oath that comics take, that we will go up and share everything the irreverent, the scary.”

Cook’s words indicate that he won’t shy away from covering tough stuff in the new show, which he’s been honing for years at Los Angeles’ Laugh Factorysubjects like his failed NBC series Next Caller (which was canceled before airing a single episode), joke-stealing allegations that led to a memorable guest appearance on Louie in 2011, and the army of haters determined to pounce on his every misstep. (A sampling of headlines written after Cook controversially announced that he wouldn’t live-stream his performance at May’s Boston Strong charity concert: “Everyone Hates Dane Cook More After Boston Strong Jerkiness;” “Dane Cook Can Even Find Ways to Make You Hate Him at a Boston Charity Show;”  “Benefit Concert Unites Americans in Love of Boston, Hatred of Dane Cook.“)

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'The Goodwin Games' are nearly over: Why you should check out the finale

On the surface, The Goodwin Games seems to exemplify an increasingly common small screen trend: Disappointment Television, a.k.a. pedigreed, mega-hyped series that build impossibly high expectations and end up landing more with a whimper than a bang. (See also: Smash, The Newsroom, and, to some extent, Arrested Development‘s fourth season.)

Like its brethren, Goodwin was conceived and created by a big-name team — in this case, How I Met Your Mother‘s Carter Bays and Craig Thomas. Like the others, it features a cast of talented ringers, including Scott Foley, Beau Bridges, and most of all Becki Newton, who deserves to be about one jillion times more famous than she is. And like both Smash and The Newsroom, it had an auspicious beginning: Fox won the right to air the sitcom after a fierce bidding war, and it was officially picked up to series last May.

Then trouble struck. Fox elected not to air The Goodwin Games in the fall, saving it for midseason instead. In November 2012, the network abandoned that plan altogether, halting production on Goodwin and reducing its initial order from 13 episodes to 7. The comedy finally found its way to screens in May, when Fox began burning off airing its truncated first season. And though Goodwin hasn’t officially been canceled, its placement on Fox’s schedule and its history — not to mention Scott Foley’s new gig as a series regular on ABC’s Scandal — don’t bode well for its future.

Which is a real shame — because unlike the other pillars of Disappointment Television, The Goodwin Games is actually, well, goodREAD FULL STORY

Jerry Seinfeld test-drives a new post-office bit, is obsessed with 'Moneyball' - EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

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During EW’s long conversation with Jerry Seinfeld about the art of comedy and how that obsession became the web series Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, Seinfeld talked a lot about the fact that most great comedy comes from irritation, and that all the greats have the ability to spin that sense of annoyance into something hilarious.

So what is currently bothering Seinfeld? The post office. Specifically, the silliness of their conveyances and the cost of stamps. “Stop going up a penny on the stamps,” he said. “Just make it a dollar, and if there’s any profit, get yourself some pants and a real car.”

In addition to the postal service, Seinfeld is also currently obsessed with the movie Moneyball. “Any time I get some free time, I just play it and sit and watch it over and over,” Seinfeld said.

Check out his whole in-development post office bit as well as his thoughts on Moneyball below.
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'Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee' season 2 react: Jerry Seinfeld rides again with Sarah Silverman, David Letterman

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The most risky thing about Jerry Seinfeld’s web series Comedians In Cars Getting Coffee is the length. Each installment is just the right size to feel like a tedious waste of time if the jokes or chatter don’t land. The first two episodes of the second season avoid being weak cups of Jerry, although one offers a better jolt than the other.

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Jerry Seinfeld names his favorite funny movies -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

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The second season of Jerry Seinfeld’s Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee kicked off last week with a killer episode featuring Sarah Silverman. This week, David Letterman joins Seinfeld on his quest for caffeine via a cool ride; that episode will go live at Noon today over at the show’s official website and at Crackle.

For an even bigger Seinfeld fix, check out this week’s issue of Entertainment Weekly, which features Seinfeld’s explanation of the whole CICGC phenomenon in his own words. The conversation with the comedy legend diverted into all sorts of other areas (much like an episode of his new series), and he revealed to EW his five favorite funny films of all time.

His picks are eclectic, and they include at least one movie that is definitely not a comedy. Check out Seinfeld’s picks in the exclusive video below.  READ FULL STORY

'Anchorman 2' trailer: It's kind of a big deal. Let's do a deep dive!

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Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues isn’t the sort of film that normally demands the deep dive treatment. Careful frame-by-frame analyses are generally reserved for big-name adaptations, franchise-extending summer blockbusters, and comic book-based extravaganzas — you know, action movies with rich mythologies and lots of things that go “boom.”

But even if this clip is devoid of space ships, costumed heroes, and fights to the death, it’s chock-full of intriguing new characters, tantalizing plot tidbits, and righteous mustaches — making it the perfect candidate for some good, old-fashioned obsessive scrutiny.
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Dan Harmon apologizes for trashing 'Community' season 4: 'I was not thinking about anyone but myself'

And thus another Harmontroversy draws to a close — at least, until the Community creator ruffles another set of feathers. (In other words: Watch this space.)

In a lengthy post that appeared on his personal Tumblr about five hours ago, Dan Harmon apologized profusely for badmouthing Community‘s fourth season during the most recent edition of his “Harmontown” podcast. The brutally, suicidally honest writer was recorded comparing the experience of watching those 13 episodes to “flipping through Instagram just watching your girlfriend blow everyone” and “being held down and watching your family get raped on a beach.”

The general gist of Harmon’s apologia: He spoke without considering anyone’s feelings but his own. “After five seconds of thinking, I realized, as usual, that other people might be hurt, and that I really need to do this whole ‘saying things and thinking about other people’ cycle in a different order at some point,” Harmon admitted. “I was very much not thinking about anyone but myself while watching that season, which was the crime [...] I was just indulging my petty feelings about being left out. It seemed kind of funny at the time because it seemed at the time like I was the only person with feelings.”

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Dan Harmon compares watching season 4 of 'Community' to... some terrible stuff

Only one thing could get Dan Harmon to watch the fourth season of Community, the NBC sitcom that was so cruelly ripped away from him last spring: being reinstated as his creation’s executive producer.

And now that he has watched it… hoo boy.

Harmon spilled his thoughts during the most recent edition of “Harmontown,” the digressive comedy show-slash-podcast he hosts with Jeff B. Davis each week. At first, his reaction was fairly tame; Harmon said he felt comfortable calling the season “not my cup of tea,” since it was obviously an “impression, and an unflattering one” of Community under his own stewardship. (The episodes in a nutshell, according to Harmon: “DURRRR! I’m Dan Harmon! DURRRR!”)

But after that assessment, Harmon got a little more graphic — comparing sitting through this past season to “flipping through Instagram just watching your girlfriend blow everyone” and seeing a friend “Like” a photo of your ex-girlfriend with her new boyfriend on Facebook.

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For Father's Day, skip the U.S. Open and watch more 'Caddyshack'

Does the U.S. Open always fall on the same weekend as Father’s Day because of the stereotype that if you have fathered a child, you automatically love golf? It’s a strange confluence of events, but it seems to work for some people, as no fewer than 27 million dads will get some sort of lame golf-related gift this weekend.

But let’s face it: Golf is boring. Strike that—golf is deadly boring. The most boring.

But forget all that, because the one silver lining to all this golf talk is that it’s an excellent excuse to talk about Caddyshack one more time. A lot of comedies from that era have not aged particularly well, but Caddyshack holds up, partially because golf will always seem sort of silly, and partially because of the commitment from both Chevy Chase, Rodney Dangerfield and Bill Murray, all of whom turn in instant-classic performances. Not only that, but it established them all as bankable movie stars, all of whom would have major studio pictures built around them in the coming years.

To celebrate the greatness of Caddyshack, the folks over at YEAH! have put together a cool infographic that runs down Caddyshack by the numbers. Highlights include: Six (the number of days Murray actually worked on the film), 10,000 (the number of gallons of water used during the famous scene where Murray’s Carl Spackler floods the gopher hole), and $117,613,400 (the domestic box office in today’s dollars).

Click the image above for the full graphic, or check it out right here.

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