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Tag: Comedy (71-80 of 367)

Stephen Colbert: The truth behind that Daft Punk dance party

Assuming you’ve got two ears and a heart, chances are you loved The Colbert Report‘s star-studded “Get Lucky” dance party video — which Stephen Colbert debuted after explaining that Daft Punk’s skittish Frenchmen had abruptly canceled a scheduled appearance on his show.

But will you still appreciate the video after learning conclusively that it wasn’t cobbled together in just two days?

If the answer’s “no,” you might want to close this tab right about now. If “yes,” read on.

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'Clear History': HBO movie's 'Curb'-iest moments

Watching an HBO one-off starring Larry David and Jon Hamm was such a no-brainer for me that I think I expected to like it too much. Clear History — which first aired Saturday night and is available now on HBO Go — works better as an extended all-star episode of Curb Your Enthusiasm than as a full-length feature.

But would any Curb fan turn down a feature-length episode? Hell to the no! The film’s complicated backstory and confusing arc (are we really to believe the cantankerous Rolly –  basically Larry David playing himself — is considered the nicest guy on Martha’s Vineyard?) can be overlooked if you decide to just sit back and enjoy the performances from David, Hamm, and co-stars Kate Hudson, Amy Ryan, Danny McBride, Eva Mendes, Bill Hader, Michael Keaton, J.B. Smoove, Philip Baker Hall, and an uncredited Liev Schreiber. (Maybe he thought Ray Donovan would put a hit out on him if he figured out he’d jumped from Showtime to HBO to play a long-haired Chechnyan criminal?)

Below, Clear History‘s Curb-iest moments:
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Watch James Franco get punched in the face -- VIDEO

So technically, this video is a promo for James Franco’s upcoming Comedy Central Roast, which airs Sept. 2. But we prefer to think that whoever’s behind that boxing glove (and behind the camera) has a deeper reason for wanting to clock The Francinator — because Lord knows there are enough people dying to do just that.

Maybe it’s the ghost of James Dean. Maybe it’s a struggling MFA grad burning with resentment over Palo Alto. Maybe it’s that angry NYU professor who sued Franco last fall. Maybe it’s Anne Hathaway.

Regardless, we’ve got to give the good people at Comedy Central a round of applause for making a pretty perfect commercial. And then we’ve got to take a moment to ponder how we really feel about James Franco… because between Spring Breakers, This Is the End, and the following clip, it’s becoming a lot harder to hold a grudge against the guy. Damnit, James!
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'Whose Line Is It Anyway' revival: What's your first impression?

The best thing about the new Whose Line: It’s just like the old Whose Line.

Sure, the set looks a little snazzier, a few new games have been thrown into the mix, and Drew Carey has morphed into Aisha Tyler. But the heart of the show is still what it always was — sharp, fast-paced short-form improv performed by a team of veterans who know each other’s rhythms inside and out. The only real difference is that Colin Mochrie’s few remaining hairs have changed from blondish-brown to snowy white.

Given how often Mochrie, Ryan Stiles, and Wayne Brady have performed together since the American version of Whose Line went off the air in 2007, this isn’t exactly shocking. Still, it’s a huge relief to anyone who feared that the series’s legacy might be tainted by a lukewarm re-do. It was smart of The CW to stick with the American Whose Line‘s tried-and-true team, rather than updating the series with a younger crew; keeping its core dynamics (Ryan and Colin’s near-telepathic connection, Wayne’s musical swagger) intact makes this newest version feel more like a continuation than a reboot, which is all the show’s fans really wanted.

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'Whose Line Is It Anyway?' returns! Celebrate by watching the show's 10 greatest classic clips

Whose Line Is It Anyway? — which introduced a generation to both improvisational comedy and Ryan Stiles’ blue shoes — had an extraordinarily long life, as entertainment franchises go. It began as a British radio program (sorry, programme) in 1988, quickly morphed into a TV series that lasted 10 years, then hopped the pond for an eight-season run on ABC and ABC Family. The series’ last new episode aired just six years ago.

But in an age when nostalgia can be fairly instantaneous — note the tale of Les Misérables, which ran from 1987 to 2003 on Broadway, then was revived from 2006-2008, and will be revived again in March 2014 — half a dozen years may as well be a hundred.

It’s not really surprising, then, that thirsty comedy fans flipped out when The CW revealed in March that Whose Line would be back for 10 episodes this summer. Veteran improvisers Colin Mochrie, Wayne Brady, and Stiles will all appear in each installment; comedian Aisha Tyler is stepping in for Drew Carey as host.

The original cast’s involvement — as well as the few teaser clips The CW has released so far — should help soothe those who worry that Whose Line 4.0 won’t live up its earlier incarnations. That said, it’d be tough for anything to reach the heights of these 10 classic clips — which, if anything, have only gotten better with age.
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Check out 10 now-famous comedians in their early days of stand-up

Patton Oswalt posted a clip on Twitter of his first acting gig at the tender age of 19. The seasoned actor-comedian may not totally appreciate the look back at his performing roots — a faux stand-up routine that doubles as an educational video on college loans — but fans and viewers are sure to be amused by not just the look back at the then-baby-faced Oswalt but also the totally outrageous early 90s fashion. Every comedian started somewhere — often on a dark stage in awesomely dated clothes.

Watch his set below and check out the stand-up routines (and the fashions!) from some of your favorite comedians. (Some  videos may be NSFW due to explicit language.) READ FULL STORY

Dane Cook announces new 'Under Oath' tour: 'Let there be hate'

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Guess who’s back?

Four years after taking the country by storm with his last major tour2009′s “ISolated INcident”Dane Cook is preparing to hit the road again this fall. He’s calling his latest venture “Under Oath,” a loaded name that wasn’t chosen lightly. “As a comedian, I am obligated to tell you the truth, my truth,” he explained to EW in an exclusive interview. “To share with you my beliefs, my perspective. And I think that we forget sometimes that that’s the oath that comics take, that we will go up and share everything the irreverent, the scary.”

Cook’s words indicate that he won’t shy away from covering tough stuff in the new show, which he’s been honing for years at Los Angeles’ Laugh Factorysubjects like his failed NBC series Next Caller (which was canceled before airing a single episode), joke-stealing allegations that led to a memorable guest appearance on Louie in 2011, and the army of haters determined to pounce on his every misstep. (A sampling of headlines written after Cook controversially announced that he wouldn’t live-stream his performance at May’s Boston Strong charity concert: “Everyone Hates Dane Cook More After Boston Strong Jerkiness;” “Dane Cook Can Even Find Ways to Make You Hate Him at a Boston Charity Show;”  “Benefit Concert Unites Americans in Love of Boston, Hatred of Dane Cook.“)

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'The Goodwin Games' are nearly over: Why you should check out the finale

On the surface, The Goodwin Games seems to exemplify an increasingly common small screen trend: Disappointment Television, a.k.a. pedigreed, mega-hyped series that build impossibly high expectations and end up landing more with a whimper than a bang. (See also: Smash, The Newsroom, and, to some extent, Arrested Development‘s fourth season.)

Like its brethren, Goodwin was conceived and created by a big-name team — in this case, How I Met Your Mother‘s Carter Bays and Craig Thomas. Like the others, it features a cast of talented ringers, including Scott Foley, Beau Bridges, and most of all Becki Newton, who deserves to be about one jillion times more famous than she is. And like both Smash and The Newsroom, it had an auspicious beginning: Fox won the right to air the sitcom after a fierce bidding war, and it was officially picked up to series last May.

Then trouble struck. Fox elected not to air The Goodwin Games in the fall, saving it for midseason instead. In November 2012, the network abandoned that plan altogether, halting production on Goodwin and reducing its initial order from 13 episodes to 7. The comedy finally found its way to screens in May, when Fox began burning off airing its truncated first season. And though Goodwin hasn’t officially been canceled, its placement on Fox’s schedule and its history — not to mention Scott Foley’s new gig as a series regular on ABC’s Scandal — don’t bode well for its future.

Which is a real shame — because unlike the other pillars of Disappointment Television, The Goodwin Games is actually, well, goodREAD FULL STORY

Jerry Seinfeld test-drives a new post-office bit, is obsessed with 'Moneyball' - EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

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During EW’s long conversation with Jerry Seinfeld about the art of comedy and how that obsession became the web series Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, Seinfeld talked a lot about the fact that most great comedy comes from irritation, and that all the greats have the ability to spin that sense of annoyance into something hilarious.

So what is currently bothering Seinfeld? The post office. Specifically, the silliness of their conveyances and the cost of stamps. “Stop going up a penny on the stamps,” he said. “Just make it a dollar, and if there’s any profit, get yourself some pants and a real car.”

In addition to the postal service, Seinfeld is also currently obsessed with the movie Moneyball. “Any time I get some free time, I just play it and sit and watch it over and over,” Seinfeld said.

Check out his whole in-development post office bit as well as his thoughts on Moneyball below.
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'Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee' season 2 react: Jerry Seinfeld rides again with Sarah Silverman, David Letterman

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The most risky thing about Jerry Seinfeld’s web series Comedians In Cars Getting Coffee is the length. Each installment is just the right size to feel like a tedious waste of time if the jokes or chatter don’t land. The first two episodes of the second season avoid being weak cups of Jerry, although one offers a better jolt than the other.

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