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Tag: Comedy (11-20 of 368)

What to expect from the L.A. Podcast Festival (and how you can watch at home)

The summer music festival season is over, but there’s still at least one can’t-miss festival on the horizon. This weekend marks the third annual Los Angeles Podcast Festival, which features live recordings of dozens of comedy podcasts, as well as panels, stand-up shows, and parties. The lineup of all-star microphone fiends features Marc Maron (WTF With Marc Maron), Aisha Tyler (Girl on Guy), Dana Gould (The Dana Gould Hour), Jimmy Pardo (Never Not Funny), Todd Glass (The Todd Glass Show), April Richardson (Go Bayside!), Larry Miller (This Week With Larry Miller), Janet Varney (The JV Club), and an eclectic bunch of others. Announced guests on various shows include Whitney Cummings, Horatio Sanz, and Hal Sparks, with plenty of others coming.  READ FULL STORY

Introducing Batman villains to 'Gotham,' one cheesy line at a time

Fox’s new series Gotham has the difficult task of introducing a number of famous and lesser-known Batman villains before they officially don the costume and alter ego. The show’s pilot accomplishes this in its own special way: by hinting at appearances by the Penguin, Mr. Freeze, and the Riddler with some very, very obvious bits of dialogue. For example: “If I want riddles, I’ll read the funny pages.”

With so many possible criminals just waiting in the back alleys of Gotham, the show will have to clock in some overtime in order to showcase them all; if the show lasts for several seasons, the producers may have to resort to Crazy-Quilt and Film Freak. How exactly will the show handle hinting at these and other criminals? Subtle (read: not at all subtle) dialogue clues, of course.

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A history of the ever-changing 'Saturday Night Live' cast

Ever since its second season, when Chevy Chase decided to ditch Saturday Night Live for Hollywood—he was replaced by some guy named Bill Murray—the only constant on NBC’s long-running sketch series has been change.

Some cast members leave to make movies or TV series or joke-punk albums nominally written by their British alter egos. Others quit in protest. Still more are forced out, not because they want to leave but because the show is going through a fraught series of retoolings (see: the ’80s). Or because it has to make room for a new crop of bright young things (see: Chris Parnell, the first time he was let go from SNL). Or because budget cuts mean an across-the-board belt-tightening (see: Chris Parnell, the second time he was let go from SNL). Or because the previous year’s cast was simply too damn big (see: the four featured players from season 39 who won’t be returning when the show does Sept. 27). And every time cast members go, either gently or kicking and screaming, there’s a fresh crop of untested talent waiting to take their places. Just call SNL the hydra of comedy.

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Everything you need to know about new 'SNL' player Pete Davidson

Saturday Night Live got a new addition Monday when it was announced that comedian Pete Davidson will be a featured player this season. But who is he?

First off, he’s only 20 years old. Staten Island native Davidson started performing when he was 16 and soon made his way onto shows like MTV’s Guy Code and Comedy Central’s Adam DeVine’s House Party. Here’s where you might have seen him: READ FULL STORY

Remembering Michael Che's too-brief 'Daily Show' run

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When word broke late Thursday that Saturday Night Live will shake up the Weekend Update desk once again this season, fan reaction was swift and decisive. The consensus: Lorne Michaels was replacing the wrong anchor.

Specifically: Cecily Strong, who took her seat at the Update desk last fall—and earned generally positive reviews for her work there—is out. SNL head writer Colin Jost, who joined Update in March after Seth Meyers’ departure—and has received, er, slightly less encouraging feedback—is staying put.  READ FULL STORY

Joan Rivers: A video tribute

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Joan Rivers’ career spanned several decades filled with dozens of hilarious film, television, and stage appearances. The comedienne and TV host, who died on Thursday at age 81, repurposed her own life experiences into biting, insightful, groundbreaking comedy.

From her early appearances on the Sammy Davis, Jr. Show to playing a robot in Spaceballs to her recent appearances on shows like Louie, Rivers imbued her jokes with energy and wit that few others have matched. In honor of her vast and memorable career, here’s a tribute featuring a few of the countless times Rivers made audiences laugh.

Tenacious D wants to sell you hard on its music and comedy festival

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There are many kinds of supreme worth your attention: Burrito supreme, chicken supreme, Cutlass Supreme… Oh, and let’s not forget a nacho supreme. But Jack Black and Kyle Gass—you know, the guys that formed a band, the likes of which had never been seen, and they called themselves Tenacious D—have concocted a special type of supreme, and it’s called Festival Supreme. READ FULL STORY

Watch Joel McHale and Tony Hale score drugs in 'Comedians in Cars Getting Cocaine'

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L.A.-area dealers, beware: Tony Hale will not pay for his drugs.

That’s one of the many takeaways from “Comedians in Cars Getting Cocaine,” The Soup‘s Joel McHale-hosted spoof of Jerry Seinfeld’s friendlier, Coffee-ier web series. The video shows the cult-sitcom star picking up the, um, other cult-sitcom star for a nice top-down ride around Southern California. They discuss Arrested Development, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, and how Tony Hale likes to numb away his shameful past with the power of cocaine.

Funny stuff! And hey, it’s not a bad day for an on-point homage to Jerry’s work (complete with light jazz!), given that today marks the 25th anniversary of the premiere of Seinfeld.

Watch the video below to see if McHale and Hale inhale:

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Video: Who is our new favorite 'Jeopardy' loser?

That’d be American hero Ari Voukydis, a comedian and veteran improv teacher who found himself a distant second going into Final Jeopardy on Thursday’s episode. The clue category: “Science & Industry.” The answer: “In 1891, this European said, ‘Perhaps my factories will put an end to war sooner than your Congresses.'”

The correct question? That’d be “Who is Alfred Nobel?”—the Swedish armaments manufacturer who invented dynamite, then was inspired to create the Nobel Prize (for physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature, and peace) after reading his own obituary. (Truth: Stranger than fiction!) Unfortunately, none of the smartypantses playing in last night’s game could name him; fortunately, Voukydis came up with something even better.

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Video: Dana Carvey channels Johnny Carson on 'Letterman'

Yes, that headline might make the following video sound like one of the most exciting comedy clips of the early 1990s. However: There’s an undeniable retro charm in watching Master of Disguise Carvey embody the King of Late Night on a show hosted by the man Carson wanted as his heir—especially when Carvey takes aim at ever-so-slightly dated topics like Rob Ford and Justin Bieber’s poor abandoned monkey.

In short, this is dad humor at its best. Hike up your Dockers and watch below.

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