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Tag: Comedy (11-20 of 351)

Stephen Colbert on taking over for Letterman: 'Those are some huge shoes to fill -- and some really big pants'

“One thing before we get started,” Stephen Colbert said at the beginning of Thursday’s Colbert Report. “There was some big news last week that slipped through my news-crack. It concerned someone I’ve admired for years, and yet, surprisingly, is not me.”

Colbert was speaking, of course, about David Letterman — who revealed on April 3 that he’s leaving CBS’s Late Show in 2015. Just one week later, word broke that his desk will be inherited by none other than Colbert himself. (By which I mean the actual Stephen Colbert — not the character he’s been playing on the Report since 2005.)

“Dave has been on the air my entire adult life,” Colbert continued. “Late Night debuted my first night in college. I learned more from watching Dave than I did from going to my classes, especially the ones I did not go to because I had stayed up till 1:30 watching Dave.

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On the Scene: Seth Rogen's Hilarity for Charity benefit

Alzheimer’s? The worst. Seth Rogen, wife Lauren Miller, and their crew of charity-loving comedians getting together for an Alzheimer’s research benefit? The best.

Miller’s own mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s at age 55, which inspired Miller and her husband to find a way to educate more people about the disease. They created Hilarity for Charity to bring Alzheimer’s awareness to younger crowds, and, more concretely, to fund Alzheimer’s research and donate resources to families struggling with it.  READ FULL STORY

Todd Barry talks 'Crowd Work' special and getting your friends to pay for stuff

Though he has put “stand-up comedian” on his tax return for over two decades, Todd Barry did not prepare any new material for his brand new special, which was produced by Louis C.K. and distributed through his website for five bucks.

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In case you missed it: 'The Simpsons' pay tribute to David Letterman -- VIDEO

Homer Simpson isn’t the biggest fan of the Big Apple. (“New York is a hellhole. And you know how I feel about hellholes.”) But when a comedy legend announces that he’s retiring after more than 30 consecutive years on late-night TV, it’s important to pay your respects — even if that means facing terrible traffic, street shysters, and haughty gatekeepers in the (animated) city of New York.

That’s exactly what Homer and his family do in the following couch gag, a special online tribute created shortly after Letterman revealed that he’s stepping away from the Late Show in 2015. (Fun fact: It’s actually not the first time the yellow family has crashed Letterman’s set; a less polished gag along these same lines aired before “The Last Temptation of Homer” in 1993.) Sure, The Simpsons and Letterman air on rival networks – but they’re both TV’s elder statesman, and it’s nice to see a venerable comedy franchise honor one of its own.

Now, who’s in the mood for some khlav kalash?

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Will Ferrell as Bobby Riggs: Tennis' best hope to serve some Hollywood love

“The best way to handle women is to keep them pregnant and barefoot.”

I don’t mind being called a male chauvinist pig as long as I’m the No. 1 male chauvinist pig.”

Sound like things Ron Burgundy might say? Close. Those were the choice quips of Bobby Riggs, the 1970s tennis hustler who baited top women pros into a series of lucrative “Battle of the Sexes” matches. In 1973, he famously lost to Billie Jean King in straight sets during a carnival-stunt spectacular that seems extremely ridiculous in hindsight but had enormous cultural implications at the time.

Riggs was undeniably a character, and the announcement that Will Ferrell is attached to star in a movie about the ballyhooed Riggs/King match is welcome news for Ferrell fans. Variety reported that the star, Adam McKay, and Peter Chermin Entertainment will produce a film, based on last year’s ESPN article, “The Match Maker,” which looked into Riggs’ underworld gambling connections and speculated on whether he purposely threw the big match. READ FULL STORY

'Saturday Night Live' recap: Louis C.K. does his thing

It’s too bad the Polar Vortex doesn’t inspire the same creativity as Hurricane Sandy.

When Louis C.K. first hosted SNL in 2012, his debut was nearly ruined by devastating weather. Against all odds, the show went on anyway — and it ended up being one of that fall’s more successful episodes. Although Saturday’s weather (in New York City, anyway) echoed 2012′s cold, rainy November, the show wasn’t quite as on point this time around. C.K. acquitted himself fairly well, minus a few flubbed lines and character breaks. That said, he only really let loose in his opening monologue, perhaps because it’s the only opportunity he had to do what he really does best.

So the show wasn’t great across the board — but it did have a few gems, including the night’s…

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The #CancelColbert defense: Does it matter who tweeted Stephen's joke?

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Let’s put aside whether the tweet was offensive or not.

I know that’s difficult. Judging by the reactions on Twitter and the comments on last night’s post, you probably have strong feelings, one way or another, about Stephen Colbert’s joke about Asians — a joke that wasn’t supposed to be a joke about Asians at all, but about Washington Redskins owner Dan Snyder.

First, here is the context (in a story that is all about context): During a sports-themed segment of Wednesday night’s The Colbert Report, the host mocked Snyder for responding to complaints about his team name by announcing a foundation to help Native Americans. Then on Thursday, The Colbert Report‘s Twitter account echoed his on-air punchline: “I am willing to show #Asian community I care by introducing the Ching-Chong Ding-Dong Foundation for Sensitivity to Orientals or Whatever.”

Twitter exploded with #CancelColbert outrage. The tweet was deleted. Later that night, Colbert tweeted that he does not control the @ColbertReport feed:

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The 'Idiot's Guide' to understanding music snobs -- VIDEO

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If you choose your favorite bands based on their obscurity, the following video is not for you. (Unless you have a sense of humor. Do music snobs have a sense of humor?)

For everyone else, the comedy network Above Average has created a guide to interacting with the world’s most picky music fans. It’s the second installment in their tongue-in-cheek Idiot’s Guide to Smart People series, and it’s quite humorously spot-on.

The video opens by explaining to viewers (a.k.a. “idiots”) that “it takes a smart person to love music in a way that takes all the fun out of it.” When interacting with a “smart person” in a situation that involves music, here are some of their tips:

Be as painstakingly specific as you possibly can when telling a music snob what kind of genres you like. “Louisiana Swamp Pop” would be a particularly good choice.

The more mainstream success a band has, the less a smart person will like them. Bon Iver is so 2007.

Do not, under any circumstances and bouts of common sense, wear a band’s T-shirt to said band’s concert.

And remember: When in doubt, heavy metal is the answer.

SXSW: Comedian Doug Benson and friends take on 'Big Trouble In Little China'

Depending on your perspective, comedian Doug Benson is either best known as a movie aficionado (he hosts the hit podcast Doug Loves Movies) or as a comedic hero to weed smokers everywhere (he directed the hilarious documentary Super High Me and recently launched a video podcast called Getting Doug With High that features him getting stoned with comic friends).

The former was on display on the last day of the annual South By Southwest festival when Benson hosted Doug Benson’s Movie Interruption at the Alamo Draft House Ritz in Austin. The Movie Interruption is a simple premise: Benson screens a movie, and he and a few cohorts sit with live microphones and riff on the film — not unlike a live, improvised version of Mystery Science Theater 3000.

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'Daily Show' welcomes new correspondent in appropriately meta segment -- VIDEO

As of yesterday, the best damn news team in America has a new member: Jordan Klepper, an Upright Citizens Brigade veteran who happens to look a lot like the vast majority of SNL‘s new featured players (read: blandly handsome; white). The Daily Show — which, in the fairly recent past, has come under fire for a lack of onscreen and behind-the-scenes diversity — made a joke of this in Klepper’s very first segment Monday night, naming him the program’s new Senior Caucasian Correspondent. And naturally, the self-referential humor didn’t stop there.

Theoretically, Klepper’s Caucasian-ness made him the perfect choice for a piece focusing on the situation in Crimea. In practice, the poor guy was so nervous that he ended up turning the entire segment into a self-conscious commentary on his own situation as a new member of the Daily Show family — culminating in a fourth-wall busting act that might have gotten Klepper the ax if, you know, it hadn’t been planned. Nicely done, Jordan; we’re sure Dad is very proud of you this morning.

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