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Tag: Christopher Nolan (1-10 of 18)

Fancy cinemas, friendships with robots: The future according to celebrities

To celebrate its 125th birthday, The Wall Street Journal got a bunch of big names to write down their thoughts on what tomorrow will be like for a package called “The Future of Everything.” Mark Zuckerberg wrote about how the internet needs to—and will—be accessible to everyone one day; Taylor Swift revealed musicians just need to keep surprising their fans to keep the music industry alive. Oh, and Tyra Banks predicted everyone will have a robot friend who they rely on to boost their self-esteem—so basically, society is doomed.

Not everyone’s predictions are as extreme as Banks’ though: Director Christopher Nolan thinks movie theaters are going to be swankier and AMC’s Josh Sapan believes quality TV will eventually dominate and leave little room for unoriginal series. OK, so maybe we aren’t doomed after all. READ FULL STORY

Director Len Wiseman exits 'Mummy' reboot: Who should step in?

Looks like The Mummy reboot isn’t going to be in theaters for awhile.

Len Wiseman, director of the seemingly endless onslaught of Underworld films and high-action hot messes like Total Recall, recently left the Universal project, according to Variety. Universal had no comment, but this obviously means that a spot is open for one of Hollywood’s greatest directorial talents to step in and make a quality reboot, one good enough that it’ll make it seem like The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor never happened.

You, the ever intelligent pop culture fanatic at home, might ask: Why the reboot? Well, first of all, that’s what we were all saying about The Amazing Spider-Man, and that turned out just fine. And what about Batman Begins, Evil Dead, and Star Trek? (Just don’t mention The Lone Ranger – it ruins the theory). The Mummy, though close to perfect in my eyes, could use a little revamping. First of all, it was one of those underrated gems, it didn’t necessarily receive the best reviews and it wasn’t necessarily on Avatar‘s box office level — though grossing over $400 million is impressive — but it did have heart. It also had Brendan Fraser, the “next big thing” of the ’90s/early naughts and a pre-Oscar Rachel Weisz. It was fun, it was ridiculous (mummies rising from the dead!), it was scary (mummies rising from the dead!). Plus, instead of sucking, the sequel, The Mummy Returns, was actually good. And in my mind, Tomb of the Dragon Emperor does not exist.
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Is Ryan Gosling the only actor who can battle Superman AND defeat Iron Man?

With Warner Bros.’s Comic-Con announcement that Zack Snyder’s Man of Steel Superman follow-up will be inspired by Frank Miller’s The Dark Knight Returns, pitting DC Comics’ two biggest heroes against each other in a 2015 summer blockbuster, Christian Bale can expect to field a new wave of questions about his involvement with the Batman franchise. To be fair, he’s put them to rest several times, most emphatically when he recently told EW that he’d really-really retired the cowl. “We were incredibly fortunate to get to make three [Batman films]. That’s enough. Let’s not get greedy,” Bale said. “[The role of Batman] is a torch that should be handed from one actor to another. So I enjoy looking forward to what somebody else will come up with.”

Of course, that won’t stop months and months of hopeful speculation that it will ultimately be Bale’s grip around Henry Cavill’s throat — until the day TMZ finally posts the first on-set images of some new actor as Batman. In The Dark Knight Rises, Bale’s Bruce Wayne explained his M.O. to Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s mysterious cop: “The idea was to be a suit. Batman could be anybody. That was the point.” If only that were true. For a generation of moviegoers, Bale is Batman, and the idea of Gordon-Levitt or Armie Hammer — who was poised to play Batman in George Miller’s canceled Justice League movie in 2007 — behind the mask simply lacks the same amount of credibility and excitement. Warner/Legendary/DC could try and lure Bale back with a Robert Downey Jr.-Iron Man financial offer, but if he declines, they need to think big, because even if the Dark Knight battles Superman in the next movie, the real rival is Disney/Marvel. The new Batman can’t be a build-our-own star like Andrew Garfield or Ryan Reynolds — not when the other side has Downey leading the Avengers. Cavill capably wore the cape in Man of Steel, but he’s not yet on the same fame footing as Chris Hemsworth or Chris Evans, much less Downey. The new Batman not only has to fill Bale’s shoes, but he has to go toe-to-toe with Downey in the cool department. The list of actors who could do both is pretty short, and it basically starts and ends with Ryan Gosling. READ FULL STORY

This Week's Cover: Superman at 75

1264-EW-COVER-SUPERMAN.jpg

Time really does fly.

For three-quarters of a century, Superman has been fighting the good fight, keeping Earth and its inhabitants safe from all manner of villainy and disaster. As the DC Comics character turns 75, he’s also getting a major big-screen relaunch in director Zack Snyder’s Man of Steel, opening Friday.

So for this week’s cover, Entertainment Weekly is taking a look back at all the critical moments in Superman’s evolution from dimestore hero to American pop-culture icon. We start with his first appearance in 1938’s Action Comics #1, and track him along every major step (and occasional misstep) up through his reemergence in the form of Man of Steel‘s angry, passionate, lost Superman, as played by Henry Cavill.

Here’s what you can find in EW’s obsessive history of the man in the red cape:

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Christopher Nolan reveals love of old, foreign films with Criterion 'Top 10'

Christopher Nolan has a thing for “desperate men.”

That’s the takeaway, or one of them, from the director’s list of top 10 Criterion releases, which includes Stephen Frears’ The Hit and Sidney Lumet’s Twelve Angry Men in the No. 1 and 2 spots.

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Nominated for Nothing: Why 'The Dark Knight Rises' deserved some Oscar love

Just about every year, brilliant movies are utterly ignored by the Oscars. The Searchers, Groundhog Day, Breathless, King Kong, Casino Royale, Touch of Evil, Caddyshack, Mean Streets, The Big Lebowski — the Academy has a long history of overlooking comedies, action movies, horror flicks, hard-boiled genre pics, artsy foreign films, and documentaries that aren’t about World War II. This year, we’ll be taking a closer look at films that were too small, too weird, or perhaps simply too awesome for the Academy Awards. These are the Non-Nominees.

The Film: The Dark Knight Rises, the final film in director Christopher Nolan’s massive, box-office-record-busting, heretofore-oft-Oscar-nominated Batman trilogy. Featuring Christian Bale as a broken down Bruce Wayne (a.k.a. Batman), Anne Hathaway as the (kinda) amoral safecracker Selina Kyle (a.k.a. Catwoman), and Tom Hardy as the (almost entirely) inscrutable masked villain Bane (a.k.a. Bahrjghalfragl) bent on destroying Gotham City once and for all.

Why It Wasn’t Nominated: One of the less explored ironies tucked inside this year’s Oscar snubs is the fact that the Academy chose to expand the field of Best Picture nominees to 10 in part because Nolan’s previous Batman film, The Dark Knight, failed to land a Best Picture nomination despite widespread acclaim. Four years later, The Dark Knight‘s sequel failed to land any Oscar nods at all. READ FULL STORY

10 things we learned from Christopher Nolan's 'Film Comment' interview

Image Credit: Michael Buckner/Getty Images

In a new interview with Film Comment, the magazine for the Film Society of the Lincoln Center, Christopher Nolan responds to basically every question you ever had about his Dark Knight trilogy. The thinking behind Gotham’s notorious realism? Check. The maybe-maybe not presence of Occupy Wall Street in Rises? Check. The photochemical processes involved in IMAX film production? Count on it.

The thorough and immensely enlightening interview is worth reading in full, but in case you can’t spare the time we’ve gleaned some of the best bits. Check them out after the jump.

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Will Joseph Gordon-Levitt play Batman in 'Justice League' and 'Man of Steel'? Well...

The internet feels like such a cold and empty place without any Batman movie rumors. Fortunately, HitFix posted a report late last night that is at once totally crazy and entirely plausible. According to the site, Joseph Gordon-Levitt — who played John Blake, a.k.a. Twist-Ending Robin, in The Dark Knight Rises – is already set to play Batman in the still-evolving superteam film Justice League. Moreover, reporter Drew McWeeny claims that Gordon-Levitt might be appearing in Man of Steel for a quick continuity cameo, à la Downey Jr. in Incredible Hulk. READ FULL STORY

Who should direct new 'Star Wars' movie? Christopher Nolan? Joss Whedon? J.J. Abrams?

Breathe, Star Wars fans, breathe. Maybe lie down a minute.

Following Tuesday’s nerd-shattering announcement that the Walt Disney Company is buying Lucasfilm, and the plan includes Star Wars: Episode VII, in early development and hoping for a 2015 release, the speculative race is on for who should direct.

Should it be Christopher Nolan, who exploded open the Batman franchise?  Or Star Trek reboot master J.J. Abrams? Or Joss Whedon, riding the superhero tidal wave of this year’s The Avengers? Lucasfilm founder George Lucas, who wrote and directed the 1977 Star Wars original and the later prequels, will work as a creative consultant on Star Wars: Episode VII, so love him or hate him, he won’t be returning to helm the next film.

Here are our potential picks:
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After 'The Dark Knight Rises': Where does the Batman franchise go from here?

The Dark Knight Rises marks the end of a cinematic era, but not the end of films about Batman. Now that Christopher Nolan’s Batman trilogy is complete, it’s natural to wonder what comes next for the Caped Crusader. After an appropriate hiatus, Warner Brothers will return to the Batman franchise, but as Darren Franich’s cover gallery illustrates, Nolan’s approach to the final film has made following him increasingly difficult. Let’s put aside the iconic status of the Dark Knight trilogy for a moment and consider how Nolan used the source material to compose these three films.
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