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Christopher Nolan wrote an 'Interstellar' comic about a certain spoiler's backstory

Want more Interstellar? You’re in luck—today, you can experience an entire lost chapter of the film, thanks to a new short comic written by Christopher Nolan himself. Illustrated by the award-winning team of Sean Murphy and Matt Hollingsworth (The Wake, Chrononauts), the short takes place in some spoiler-heavy territory, so click through (and read below) at your own risk.

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J.J. Abrams vs. Christopher Nolan: Which filmmaker does secrets better?

If you went to see Interstellar this weekend, chances are you didn’t know much about the movie beyond “Matthew McConaughey in space.” That’s intentional—Christopher Nolan is famously tight-lipped about his films, and the trailers that accompany them are pretty good about leaving large chunks of the plot untouched. This makes Nolan something of a unicorn: an Internet-Age blockbuster director who actively strives to preserve of the filmgoing experience as he can.

But he’s not alone in this, either—which probably makes him less of a unicorn. (Maybe he’s more like a white antelope.)  J.J. Abrams, Hollywood’s biggest sci-fi steward, is equally obsessed with keeping details about his films under wraps before they debut. It’s an admirable goal—but one that each director pursues in very different ways. Given that they both specialize in something that’s inherently frustrating—the keeping of secrets—who’s better at it? Less frustrating? Rewarding?

The answer lies with the biggest difference between the two—their relationships with fans.

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Entertainment Geekly Mailbag: 'Interstellar' rage

interstellar

Christopher Nolan made Memento, but he also made The Dark Knight Rises. Great filmmakers can make bad movies: This is not a particularly complicated equation. And Nolan’s new space melodrama Interstellar is not a particularly complicated movie. The science is elaborate and insane, but the emotional stakes are simple: Father loves daughter, father saves humanity.

But Nolan is one of our plottiest filmmakers. (Most films have three acts; Nolan’s movies usually have at least six, usually out of order and/or overlapping.) I attempted to explain the plot of Interstellar, but even I ran up against some impenetrable cosmo-logic. Some readers in the comments offered helpful suggestions. Some readers were angry that people didn’t like Interstellar, a transcendent visually stimulating three-hour odyssey. Some readers were angry that people liked Interstellar, a gooey three-hour snoozefest. Some heavy thoughts on Interstellar, is what I’m getting at.

Let’s dig into the reactions, shall we? (Warning: A million spoilers for Interstellar follow.) READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: '2001' in 2014 -- reimagining Kubrick's classic via 'Interstellar'

2001-Interstellar.jpg

EXT. THE DAWN OF TIME – DAY

A proto-human HOMINID kneels on the ground of the prehistoric Earth. Suddenly, a large shadow covers him. He looks up and sees a large rectangular MONOLITH.

A voiceover begins, British.

BRITISH VOICEOVER: The first recorded monolith appeared on Earth 4 million years ago, in the Pleistocene era.

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The 'Interstellar' plot set to '2001: A Space Odyssey' actually makes sense

Hal-2001.jpg

If someone has writen or spoken about Christopher Nolan’s Interstellar, there’s a good chance a mention of Stanley Kubrick’s seminal 2001: A Space Odyssey is not far off. CutPrintFilm took the allusion one step further and mashed up the two films to show, unsurprisingly, that they have quite a bit in common.

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Christopher Nolan says that quote about post-credits scenes is 'inaccurate' (Updated)

man-of-steel

UPDATE: Christopher Nolan has disputed the Guardian‘s report. By way of clarification, the filmmaker released the following statement: “I would never say someone else’s film isn’t ‘a real film.’ The quote is inaccurate.”

ORIGINAL STORY (4:44 p.m. ET, Nov. 4, 2014): Between the concluding chapter of his Dark Knight trilogy and this week’s space epic Interstellar, Christopher Nolan helped Warner Bros. reboot the Superman franchise with 2013’s Man of Steel. Nolan received a “story by” credit on the film and served in a producer/godfather role, although it’s never been entirely clear how involved he was in the making of Man of Steel.

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This week's cover: Your exclusive all-access pass to Christopher Nolan's 'Interstellar'

With Christopher Nolan’s forthcoming film Interstellar, the director of The Dark Knight Trilogy and Inception boldly goes into outer space with his most visually spectacular and emotionally resonant movie yet. We can say that because we’ve seen it. We also watched Nolan make it, and in this week’s Entertainment Weekly, we bring you onto the top secret set and take you into editing room to chronicle how the man who made Batman fly to new heights pushed himself creatively and personally to produce his sci-fi epic.

Interstellar opens Nov. 5 and stars Matthew McConaughey, Anne Hathaway, Jessica Chastain, Wes Bentley, Michael Caine, Casey Affleck, and John Lithgow, to name a few. (Seriously: There are more.) The plot tracks a quartet of astronauts and scientists—and the most unusual robot to grace the screen in years (meet the fall’s breakout star: a mini-monolith of metamorphic Jenga blocks named TARS)—who journey across the universe to search for a new home for mankind: In the near future of the film, Earth is dying, ravaged by blight and environmental ruin. READ FULL STORY

Fancy cinemas, friendships with robots: The future according to celebrities

To celebrate its 125th birthday, The Wall Street Journal got a bunch of big names to write down their thoughts on what tomorrow will be like for a package called “The Future of Everything.” Mark Zuckerberg wrote about how the internet needs to—and will—be accessible to everyone one day; Taylor Swift revealed musicians just need to keep surprising their fans to keep the music industry alive. Oh, and Tyra Banks predicted everyone will have a robot friend who they rely on to boost their self-esteem—so basically, society is doomed.

Not everyone’s predictions are as extreme as Banks’ though: Director Christopher Nolan thinks movie theaters are going to be swankier and AMC’s Josh Sapan believes quality TV will eventually dominate and leave little room for unoriginal series. OK, so maybe we aren’t doomed after all. READ FULL STORY

Director Len Wiseman exits 'Mummy' reboot: Who should step in?

Looks like The Mummy reboot isn’t going to be in theaters for awhile.

Len Wiseman, director of the seemingly endless onslaught of Underworld films and high-action hot messes like Total Recall, recently left the Universal project, according to Variety. Universal had no comment, but this obviously means that a spot is open for one of Hollywood’s greatest directorial talents to step in and make a quality reboot, one good enough that it’ll make it seem like The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor never happened.

You, the ever intelligent pop culture fanatic at home, might ask: Why the reboot? Well, first of all, that’s what we were all saying about The Amazing Spider-Man, and that turned out just fine. And what about Batman Begins, Evil Dead, and Star Trek? (Just don’t mention The Lone Ranger – it ruins the theory). The Mummy, though close to perfect in my eyes, could use a little revamping. First of all, it was one of those underrated gems, it didn’t necessarily receive the best reviews and it wasn’t necessarily on Avatar‘s box office level — though grossing over $400 million is impressive — but it did have heart. It also had Brendan Fraser, the “next big thing” of the ’90s/early naughts and a pre-Oscar Rachel Weisz. It was fun, it was ridiculous (mummies rising from the dead!), it was scary (mummies rising from the dead!). Plus, instead of sucking, the sequel, The Mummy Returns, was actually good. And in my mind, Tomb of the Dragon Emperor does not exist.
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Is Ryan Gosling the only actor who can battle Superman AND defeat Iron Man?

With Warner Bros.’s Comic-Con announcement that Zack Snyder’s Man of Steel Superman follow-up will be inspired by Frank Miller’s The Dark Knight Returns, pitting DC Comics’ two biggest heroes against each other in a 2015 summer blockbuster, Christian Bale can expect to field a new wave of questions about his involvement with the Batman franchise. To be fair, he’s put them to rest several times, most emphatically when he recently told EW that he’d really-really retired the cowl. “We were incredibly fortunate to get to make three [Batman films]. That’s enough. Let’s not get greedy,” Bale said. “[The role of Batman] is a torch that should be handed from one actor to another. So I enjoy looking forward to what somebody else will come up with.”

Of course, that won’t stop months and months of hopeful speculation that it will ultimately be Bale’s grip around Henry Cavill’s throat — until the day TMZ finally posts the first on-set images of some new actor as Batman. In The Dark Knight Rises, Bale’s Bruce Wayne explained his M.O. to Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s mysterious cop: “The idea was to be a suit. Batman could be anybody. That was the point.” If only that were true. For a generation of moviegoers, Bale is Batman, and the idea of Gordon-Levitt or Armie Hammer — who was poised to play Batman in George Miller’s canceled Justice League movie in 2007 — behind the mask simply lacks the same amount of credibility and excitement. Warner/Legendary/DC could try and lure Bale back with a Robert Downey Jr.-Iron Man financial offer, but if he declines, they need to think big, because even if the Dark Knight battles Superman in the next movie, the real rival is Disney/Marvel. The new Batman can’t be a build-our-own star like Andrew Garfield or Ryan Reynolds — not when the other side has Downey leading the Avengers. Cavill capably wore the cape in Man of Steel, but he’s not yet on the same fame footing as Chris Hemsworth or Chris Evans, much less Downey. The new Batman not only has to fill Bale’s shoes, but he has to go toe-to-toe with Downey in the cool department. The list of actors who could do both is pretty short, and it basically starts and ends with Ryan Gosling. READ FULL STORY

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