PopWatch Entertainment Weekly's PopWatch Blog

Tag: Broadway (71-80 of 368)

Tonys 2014: Let's talk about those snubs and surprises...

With the nominations for the 2014 Tony Awards finally upon us, the race has been blown wide open in one of the most nail-biting stage seasons in recent memory. Although Tuesday’s nominations announcement narrows down the pack to a manageable four or five candidates for Broadway’s highest honors, there’s an overwhelming feeling of absence when it comes to some of the bigger names who didn’t make the cut this year.

Snub: England’s the New Hollywood
All The Way’s Bryan Cranston and Of Mice and Men’s Chris O’Dowd are the marquee names in the race for Best Actor in a Play, but somebody’s got to be left out, and this year the Tony nominators eschewed the rest of the A-list—Zachary Quinto in The Glass Menagerie, Denzel Washington in A Raisin in the Sun, and Daniel Radcliffe in The Cripple of Inishmaan, to name a few—for British actors like Samuel Barnett and Mark Rylance. In fact, the love bestowed on classical productions like Twelfth Night (tied for most-nominated play with Glass Menagerie) demonstrates the powerful momentum of gorgeous Shakespearean revivals in a season dominated by mega Hollywood names.

Surprise: Sally’s Out, Janis is In
Last week’s final meeting of the Tony administration committee decided that the revival of Cabaret—a carbon copy of the Tony-winning 1998 production—was eligible. But did it even matter? The show was passed over for Best Musical Revival and on most other  fronts, except for Linda Emond and Danny Burstein’s much-deserved featured acting noms. Three-time Oscar nominee Michelle Williams got no love for her Sally Bowles. In the Best Actress in a Musical category already stacked with intimidating names like Sutton Foster and Idina Menzel, recognition instead went to newcomer Mary Bridget Davies of the long-since-shuttered A Night With Janis Joplin. READ FULL STORY

'Gentleman's Guide', Neil Patrick Harris' 'Hedwig' lead nominations for the 2014 Tony Awards

Fully realizing its underdog appeal, the cheeky musical A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder slayed the competition this morning with a whopping 10 Tony nominations, including nods for both of its tireless leading men, Jefferson Mays and Bryce Pinkham. Neil Patrick Harris’ return to Broadway after a decade yielded him his first-ever Tony nomination for the celebrated revival of Hedwig and the Angry Inch, which netted an impressive eight nods. (Had it been eligible as a new musical, Hedwig probably would have easily tied Guide, as score and book would have been slam dunks). Trailing these shows with seven nominations each were the spicy jazz revue After Midnight, the Carole King biomusical Beautiful, John Tiffany’s critic-adored revival of The Glass Menagerie (in which all cast members except for Zachary Quinto got nods), and the Mark Rylance-led, period specific staging of Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night (EW’s pick for best production of 2013).

It was, however, not a great morning to be a movie star trying out Broadway for the first time or returning to it. Snub-ees this year in addition to the aforementioned Quinto included the ranks of James Franco, Denzel Washington, Michelle Williams, Ian McKellen, Patrick Stewart, Daniel Radcliffe, Michael C. Hall, Toni Collette, Marisa Tomei, Rebecca Hall and Zach Braff. The Tony Awards will be broadcast live on CBS on June 8 at 8pm.

Nominations for the 2014 Tony Awards follow:

READ FULL STORY

Broadway's 'Rocky': Go behind the scenes of the climactic fight scene -- EXCLUSIVE

Much like the pugilist champ at its center, Rocky is proving a power player on Broadway. Its numbers keep going up, and more and more people are becoming ringside fans of the Philly palooka Rocky Balboa (Andy Karl) and his shy, pet-store employee girlfriend-in-waiting Adrian (Margo Seibert) all over again, after the great successes of Sylvester Stallone and company in the Oscar-winning 1976 movie. (Stallone is a book writer on this show, and could very likely be a Tony nominee this coming Tuesday, along with several others involved.)

But the ringside mention earlier is nothing short of completely literal, as director Alex Timbers (Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson) and scenic designer Christopher Barreca devised a regulation-size boxing ring for the 15-minute, climactic bout between Rocky Balboa and Apollo Creed (Terence Archie), in which a sizable portion of the orchestra patrons are (quite ingeniously) repurposed so that the ring may become a four-sided, true-to-life event for the audience. What results is one of the most eye-popping bits of stagecraft ever created, with no shortage of fun details (check out all that blood!).

In the exclusive three-minute feature below, watch as director Timbers and his fearless cast and crew explain how they went about making what seemed impossible in concept to a fully-realized reality for 1,500 attendees per evening. (And they managed to do it with far less event than another recent mega-musical, as well.) READ FULL STORY

'Daily Show' writer's 'Act of God' coming to Broadway, starring God

The-Last-Testament-A-Memoir-By-God.jpg

Soon, The Book of Mormon won’t be the only show to rattle the religious on Broadway.

Former Daily Show head writer David Javerbaum’s new comedy An Act of God has announced its plans to appear to the Broadway masses in 2015.

The play is based on the book The Last Testament: A Memoir By God, which, according to press notes, was written by God and merely put onto the page by Javerbaum. The book is purported to be “the ultimate celebrity autobiography” and is associated with Javerbaum’s wildly popular @TheTweetOfGod Twitter handle.

READ FULL STORY

Neil Patrick Harris yells at fan during 'Hedwig' performance

Neil Patrick Harris had the perfect response to an enamored fan who interrupted a recent performance of Hedwig and the Angry Inch.

“I love you, Neil!” a female admirer yelled out during the Broadway show, according to Page Six. In character, as the titular transgender East German punk, Harris responded: “I’m doing something up here, ­motherf–ker!”

Which, of course, was a much friendlier reaction than Hugh Jackman had that one time an audience member’s cell phone went off – twice — during his Broadway performance: READ FULL STORY

James Franco and other celebs who just can't stand criticism

James Franco does not take criticism of his work lightly. Currently starring in Of Mice and Men on Broadway, the actor was quite displeased with the review New York Times theater critic Ben Brantley gave the revival. Though Brantley’s assessment was not excessively negative – he even complimented Franco’s talent at one point — the actor posted an incensed response to the review on Instagram, calling the critic “a little bitch.” The post has since been deleted.

Brantley responded to the criticism much more diplomatically than Franco. “I like Franco’s work on film a lot, and he didn’t disgrace himself on stage,” the writer told the New York Observer. “I hope he returns to Broadway some day. And of course he’s entitled to say whatever he likes about me, as long as it’s not libelous, and somehow I don’t think ‘little bitch’ qualifies.”

Franco is hardly the first celebrity to lash out over hurt feelings and bad reviews. Last year, Brantley was the target of another famous actor appearing on Broadway, Alec Baldwin. The NYT critic panned his show, a revival of Orphans, and Baldwin shot back with a bitter essay on the state of modern theater on The Huffington Post. READ FULL STORY

James Franco rants about 'New York Times' review on Instagram

When the New York Times didn’t give James Franco the glowing Of Mice and Men review he wanted, the actor took to his favorite hangout, Instagram, to express his displeasure.

The show opened Wednesday night on Broadway, with Franco starring as George opposite Chris O’Dowd’s Lennie. It seems Franco spent this morning reading over reviews — including Times theater critic Ben Brantley’s evaluation. Although Brantley didn’t outright insult Franco, or even write anything overwhelmingly negative — in fact, he complimented Franco’s talent, but noted that the star is “often understated to the point of near invisibility” in the play — Franco still wasn’t pleased.

READ FULL STORY

Meet the new Mormons: Ben Platt and Nic Rouleau are on a mission in Broadway’s biggest musical

Nic Rouleau couldn’t get a ticket to The Book of Mormon.

Like the stories you’ve no doubt heard about the wildly popular, box office-busting Broadway show, tickets are one of New York’s hottest commodities, and they have been since the record-breaking musical opened just three years ago. So Rouleau turned to the show’s daily lottery system — about 2 dozen tickets offered raffle-style to eager patrons, 98 percent of whom will leave disappointed — and lucked his way into the Eugene O’Neill Theatre that way. READ FULL STORY

Broadway box office: Denzel Washington's 'Raisin in the Sun' is season's biggest hit

There are no dreams deferred for the producers of the Denzel Washington-led revival of A Raisin in the Sun. In its first full week since its April 3 opening, director Kenny Leon’s well-reviewed revival earned a remarkable $1.18 million, according to figures from the Broadway League covering ticket sales for the week ending April 13. That makes it the fifth highest-grossing show of the week and the only non-musical to cross the seven-figure threshold. And thanks to premium ticket prices as high as $348, Raisin actually exceeded the estimated gross potential of the Ethel Barrymore Theatre by 16 percent. READ FULL STORY

'The Bridges of Madison County' original cast recording -- EXCLUSIVE FIRST LISTEN

You wept at the book, then wept at the Meryl Streep-Clint Eastwood film, but save some more tears for the achingly lovely new cast recording for the Broadway tuner The Bridges of Madison County, composed by the prolific Jason Robert Brown (The Last Five Years, Parade), which gives listeners the unique pleasure of preserving two of the very best vocal performances of the last few years, by dynamite duo Kelli O’Hara and Steven Pasquale, whose stirring chemistry could set a cornfield ablaze. The musical — about a lonely Iowa farm wife (O’Hara), happily married but stifled, falling in love with a handsome photographer (Pasquale) blazing through town to capture the historic bridges of the title — has earned stellar reviews since opening in February (including one by senior editor Thom Geier), and the new album contains 20 tracks (including “Falling Into You” and “It All Fades Away”) in total. READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos

Advertisement

From Our Partners

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP