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Tag: Broadway (91-100 of 363)

This Week on Stage: Bryan Cranston goes 'All the Way'

“I have made a series of very bad decisions and I cannot make another one” was a line once spoken by Breaking Bad‘s Walter White, but it couldn’t be less true of the actor who said it. The one and only Bryan Cranston — on an impeccable roll for the last few years — has just made his Broadway debut to ecstatic notices for his lived-in, charged Lyndon Baines Johnson in All the Way, and early pundits indicate he may be the man to beat at Tony time. (Though not so fast, he still has heavy-hitters like Denzel Washington, Michael C. Hall, and Daniel Radcliffe to fend off in the next two months). In other news, King Kong is delaying plans to open this fall, making way for a revival of On the Town (which played to great acclaim in Massachusetts last season) to fill the barn-like parameters of the newly-named Lyric Theatre, vacant since Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark swung out in January to soon set up camp in Las Vegas. And the boards are ablaze with new shows in and out NYC (click on the links below for the full reviews): READ FULL STORY

No day but yesterday: 'Mamma Mia!' replaces 'Rent' as 9th longest-running Broadway show

The delightful misadventures of a group of junkies have been bested by dancing queens.

Mamma Mia!, the perennially peppy ABBA jukebox musical about an inquisitive young girl whose mother slept around on the Greek Isles, has officially ousted the cult classic musical Rent as Broadway’s ninth longest-running show. With the success of Mamma Mia!, it’s easy to see why the girl on the poster has been laughing for fifteen years.

Rent isn’t the first landmark musical that Mamma Mia! has conquered. The Benny Andersson and Björn Ulvaeus smash has also surpassed such legendary shows as Miss Saigon, Fiddler on the Roof, Hello, Dolly!, Annie, and Cabaret.

READ FULL STORY

'On the Town' revival to open on Broadway in October; 'King Kong' delayed

on-the-town.jpg

The Bronx is up, the Battery’s down, and this fall, On the Town — the musical comedy that is considered a “love letter” to New York — will be returning to Broadway in a brand-new production, just in time to coincide with the show’s 70th anniversary. The revival will be produced by Howard & Janet Kagan (Pippin, The Gershwins’ Porgy & Bess) and will feature choreography by Emmy winner Joshua Bergasse (Smash). Tony winner John Rando (Urinetown, A Christmas Story) is set to direct.

On the Town will find its new home at The Lyric Theatre, which was most recently called the Foxwoods Theatre and home to the long-running but ill-fated musical Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark. READ FULL STORY

k.d. lang reflects on her big band Broadway debut in 'After Midnight'

Four-time Grammy winner k.d. lang is finishing up her run in the dance-heavy Broadway tapper After Midnight, having taken over for Fantasia Barrino as the second in a string of starry guest artists.

Singing classics like “Stormy Weather” and “I Can’t Give You Anything But Love,” the show is a callback to lang’s jazz roots — and it’s an opportunity she’s relished as she prepares to end her Broadway debut. (lang will perform through Sunday, March 9, and the show will then welcome Toni Braxton and Babyface.) Before she packs up for good, lang chatted with EW about the lessons learned during her stint on Broadway.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: When you’re on the Broadway stage, what are the biggest differences you’ve noticed from your other shows?
k.d. lang: Certainly the energy of the cast and the high intensity of the show rubs off, and that’s a wonderful thing. I love the energy of the dancers and certainly the energy of the big band. That’s pretty new for me. READ FULL STORY

'The Bridges of Madison County': Jason Robert Brown talks bringing the acclaimed book to the stage

Jason Robert Brown just might be one of the busiest individuals currently on the theater scene. The composer and lyricist, best known for his off-Broadway hit The Last Five Years, is currently preparing for the release of the musical’s film adaptation and is also on track to bring a new production to the stage: a musical comedy called Honeymoon in Vegas, based on the 1992 film of the same name starring Sarah Jessica Parker and Nicolas Cage. In addition, his newest Broadway offering, The Bridges of Madison County, just opened at the Schoenfeld Theatre.

EW talked to the talented composer and writer about the process of bringing Bridges to the stage, and also about his excitement about bringing one of his most popular musicals to the silver screen. READ FULL STORY

This Week on Stage: Kelli O'Hara builds some 'Bridges,' 'Bronx Bombers' is outta there

Bronx Bombers has just announced a closing date of March 2, proving yet again that sports fans and Broadway do not make good bedfellows. There’s already a whisper in the air that the soon-to-be-vacant Circle in the Square might see Audra McDonald in a production of Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill a staple of regional theaters about Billie Holiday (not to be confused with last fall’s Off Broadway show Lady Day). That would complicate the Tony race for  Best Actress in a Musical, which is already shaping up as a showdown between Sutton Foster (Violet), Idina Menzel (If/Then), Jessie Mueller (Beautiful), Michelle Williams (Cabaret), and the leading lady of the week, Kelli O’Hara, who just debuted to bright notices for her lovelorn Iowa housewife in the musical version of The Bridges of Madison County. Let the diva bloodbath begin! Bridges was reviewed by EW this week as well as three other new productions (click on the links below for the full reviews): READ FULL STORY

Make way for Prince Ali: The cast of Disney's 'Aladdin' previews magic carpet ride of a Broadway musical

With the colorful world of Agrabah, an Academy Award-winning score by Howard Ashman and Alan Menken, and some of the most memorable lyrics of Disney’s golden age, it seems like Aladdin — the 1992 animated classic about a street rat and his magic lamp — was always destined for stage treatment. And next week, the flying carpet will soar at the New Amsterdam Theatre, when Aladdin begins previews ahead of its March 20 opening.

At a recent “meet the press” event, EW chatted with the show’s director/choreographer Casey Nicholaw, co-lyricist/book writer Chad Beguelin, and principal cast — including Adam Jacobs (Aladdin), Courtney Reed (Jasmine), Jonathan Freeman (Jafar), and James Monroe Iglehart (Genie) — about bringing the musical to Broadway.

READ FULL STORY

Broadway Box Office: 'Bronx Bombers' is striking out with audiences, while Shakespeare hits a grand slam

Broadway’s New York Yankees love-fest Bronx Bombers, starring Peter Scolari as Yogi Berra, isn’t exactly pulling major-league numbers at the box office. In the first full week since its Feb. 6 opening, the new drama took in a measly $177,559, according to figures released by The Broadway League. That’s less than a quarter of the potential gross at Circle in the Square (one of Broadway’s smallest theaters) — and does not bode well for its future.

The biggest surprise this winter has been the season’s unlikeliest but very palpable hit(s): the Mark Rylance-led productions of Twelfth Night and Richard III playing in repertory (and breaking house sales records) at the Belasco. For the week ending Feb. 16, the shows grossed a remarkable $944,755 — a tally that exceeds all of the season’s new musicals. The takings have topped the potential gross for the Broadhurst for the third straight week, suggesting that producers have been able to goose their earnings by selling ever more premium tickets at $247 a pop. READ FULL STORY

'Gentleman's Guide' original cast recording -- EXCLUSIVE FIRST LISTEN

Stop! Wait! What?! Yup, that’s right: EW has a listening preview of the entire cast album of the rollicking new musical A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder (prominently listed on EW’s Best of Stage this past year). The current musical — sure to be a top contender for several categories at the Hugh Jackman-hosted Tonys on June 8 — has been playing on Broadway to pleased-as-Punch audiences since October, and now you can see just what the howling is about. In Guide, the tireless Jefferson Mays plays no less than eight roles, encompassing the various members of the D’Ysquith (think “dies quick” as said by Elmer Fudd) family, a dynasty threatened by a genial serial killer (Bryce Pinkham) who attempts to bump off as many as he can to inherit a sizable fortune. Listen to 23 tracks on the full album below, which features the witty, inventive work of composers Steven Lutvak and Robert L. Freedman, two Broadway newbies we’re certain to hear more from in the future.

The album will be available digitally on February 25, with a physical CD (including a 40-page booklet and an essay by Time Out New York’s David Cote) to drop on April 1 (for information on pre-ordering, please visit the Sh-K-Boom official web page).

A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder is now playing at the Walter Kerr Theatre in an open-ended run. For tickets and additional information, please visit the show’s official website. READ FULL STORY

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