PopWatch Entertainment Weekly's PopWatch Blog

Tag: Breaking Bad (11-20 of 164)

TV Fight Club: 'The Sopranos' vs. 'Breaking Bad'

breaking-bad-sopranos

They’re both groundbreaking cable dramas about a crime lord who tries to keep his suburban family together while building his empire. Both have also often been called the best drama series of all time. In one corner: HBO’s The Sopranos (1999-2007), which pioneered the serialized anti-hero drama trend. In the other: AMC’s Breaking Bad (2008-2013), which gathered viewers and critical esteem with each passing season until some declared that it had surpassed its predecessor.

Which show was the best? Will the New Jersey or New Mexico crime boss take the crown? We’ll make the case for each—then you’re decide who wins. READ FULL STORY

One set, two actors, all dialogue: TV's best 'bottle' episodes

Sunday night’s episode of Masters of Sex, titled “Fight,” was one of the series’ best. It stuck the show’s two main characters, Dr. William Masters (Michael Sheen) and his assistant/lover Virginia Johnson (Lizzy Caplan), in a single hotel room and then let them batter out their anxieties and anger through flirtation, role play, and sex, all while an actual boxing match rages on TV.

In TV parlance, episodes like “Fight,” where characters are restricted to a few sets, are often called “bottle episodes”—they’re cheaper to make (you don’t have to build new sets or cast guest stars) but they succeed or fail depending on the quality of the writing and the actors’ performances. In other terms, “Fight” was also nearly a “two-hander,” a term borrowed from stage performance that refers to a play in which only two actors appear. READ FULL STORY

'Better Call Saul' has a real-life billboard, working phone number

Fans expect a lot from Better Call Saul. Since the show takes place before, during, and after Breaking Bad, it’s got countless opportunities to showcase familiar faces (beyond Mike, who’s a series regular). Then there’s the smaller stuff: We want to see Saul with ridiculous hair, a bluetooth in his ear, and maybe a questionable massage appointment every once in a while. But as it turns out, Saul diehards have already gotten one of their wishes: the billboard. READ FULL STORY

Some dudes sent Walter White into space, just 'cause

What do you get when you give the guys at this second-screen app a Walter White bobblehead, a powerful balloon, and an eensy-weensy camera? Why, this video, which is both totally ridiculous and surprisingly moving. (Thank mood-setting music by The National Parks and Megafaun, which make “Walter White in Space” sort of like Robot Chicken crossed with Planet Earth.)

You want to watch this thing? You’re goddamn right.

READ FULL STORY

'Breaking Bad' spin-off starring Val Kilmer and Slash hits Kickstarter

With each season of Breaking Bad, the show’s fan base grew, right up until showrunner Vince Gilligan decided that Walter White’s story had come to end after five seasons. But not everyone agreed with Gilligan’s choice. And as far as industry newcomer Larry Shepherd is concerned—spoiler!—Walt’s presumed death is not the final chapter of the story. And that’s exactly why he has launched a Kickstarter campaign for his own Breaking Bad spin-off titled Anastasia.

On the Anastasia Kickstarter page, Shepherd describes his series as picking up directly after Walter White’s collapse in the Breaking Bad finale, when a mystery person appears and drags Walt out of the meth lab by his ankles. Anastasia will focus on two U.S. Marshals—played by obvious choices Val Kilmer and Slash—who try to answer three very important questions: Is Walter White alive? Where is he? And who dragged him away? READ FULL STORY

Which 'Breaking Bad' reference is the tentative title for Bryan Cranston’s memoir?

With Breaking Bad behind us and Better Call Saul in front of us, right now is a tough time for Bad addicts. Sure, we can re-watch the show or even pop in a full-length documentary about it, but we can’t get back the feeling of watching Walter White put on the Heisenberg hat for the first time. We can’t re-experience the fear of watching Gus take a box cutter to a man’s throat. And there’s no way we’ll ever relive the millions of emotions that overpowered us when Jack killed Hank.

But what we can do is debate the best episodes, talk about our favorite scene of season 5, follow Aaron Paul’s every move, and await the arrival of Bryan Cranston’s memoir.

I realize that Cranston’s book doesn’t seem like a Breaking Bad-specific event. And there’s no guarantee that it is; after all, Cranson did plenty of stuff before Bad, and he’s done plenty of stuff since. Still, the actor has been vocal about how Breaking Bad was a transformative experience for him – so it’s safe to say the show will be discussed.

Now that we’ve learned the tentative title for Cranston’s book, we’re even more excited to give it a read. But first, we have a challenge for you: Can you pick Cranston’s true title out of the Breaking Bad references below? READ FULL STORY

Walter Jr. gives his 'Breaking Bad' dad some Father's Day forgiveness -- VIDEO

Walter Jr. will forgive a lot for the sake of a good breakfast, at least according to the actor who played him.

In a YouTube tribute, Breaking Bad actor RJ Mitte outlined all the best qualities of his TV dad, Walter White. Keeping with the Father’s Day theme, he thanked his fictional father for all the good he did for his fictional son (despite the whole, you know, brewing meth, becoming a drug kingpin, and murdering a lot of people thing). “A lot of fathers say they would do anything to provide for their family, but you, Walter White, really meant anything.” READ FULL STORY

'Breaking Bad' Spanish remake: Top moments from the new Walter, Jesse

METASTASIS

“Yo no estoy en peligro. El peligro soy yo” Breaking Bad, Episode 6, Season 4. (Translation: “I’m not in danger. I am the danger.”)

Say hola to Walter Blanco, better known to U.S. audiences as Walter White, the quiet, cancer-stricken chemistry teacher turned meth cook in cult drama Breaking Bad. In Metastasis, Walter looks the same – actor Diego Trujillo’s craggy face, goatee and wire-rimmed glasses make him an eerie doppelgänger for Bryan Cranston – but he speaks Spanish and lives in the Colombian capitol of Bogotá. READ FULL STORY

Nielsen reveals top 10 TV series on Twitter and the year's most tweeted-about episode

If television gave us anything to tweet about this year, it was Walter White’s journey from chemistry teacher to Heisenberg to whatever it was that he became.

Nielsen has released its list of this year’s most talked-about series on Twitter, which was calculated from September 1, 2013 to May 25, 2014. Breaking Bad not only topped the list — with an average reach of 6 million people per each new episode — but also took home the award for the greatest reach for a single airing, thanks to its buzzy series finale. Viewers’ final hour with Walt, Jesse, and all those crazy Nazis reached 9.1 million people on Twitter, making it quite literally the tune-in event of the year. However, The Voice set the record for total tweets sent about a single episode with 1.92 million tweets about its episode on May 13. READ FULL STORY

'Halt and Catch Fire': If Don Draper and Walter White met in 1983

Since rebranding itself as a prestige TV showcase with the launch of Mad Men in 2007, AMC has hosted its share of critical gems (Breaking Bad), popular hits (The Walking Dead), and forgettable duds (Low Winter Sun). But its most recent series — The Killing, Hell on Wheels, and Turn – have failed to break out — so there’s some additional pressure on Halt and Catch Fire, which premiered Sunday night.

Set in 1983, the show revolves around Lee Pace’s Joe MacMillan, a dynamic former IBM executive who wants to build a fledgling Dallas-based computer company into an outfit that can go toe to toe with Big Blue. One of the drones in the Dallas office is Gordon Clark (Scoot McNairy), a “misunderstood genius” whose brilliant vision has earned him nothing but a cubicle and a drinking problem. Together, with the help of Cameron (Mackenzie Davis), a pretty programming punk, they set out to reverse-engineer the IBM PC and mass-produce their own rival product.

The premiere had a lot of information to sift through, characters to establish, and techno-speak to spoon-feed, so it might take a few episodes to determine whether Halt is a keeper. But it’s clear that creators Christopher Cantwell and Christopher C. Rogers have studied what works and what doesn’t, and at first glance, they’ve borrowed generously from proven winners. In fact, it didn’t take me long after seeing Joe and Gordon at work to think, “They’re Don Draper and Walter White, right?” READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos

Advertisement

From Our Partners

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP