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Tag: Barack Obama (51-60 of 196)

Lincoln's politics: Who would it have hurt had it opened before the election?

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From the beginning, Steven Spielberg was determined to steer his Abraham Lincoln movie clear of contemporary politics. He specifically requested a post Election Day release date so as not to be engulfed in the push and pull of the heated presidential race. “Lincoln today is beyond partisan politics,” Spielberg said recently. Indeed, the 16th president was the first Republican president, yet he’s frequently claimed by modern Democrats, as well, who view Lincoln’s freeing the slaves and the passing of the 13th Amendment as an essential part of the ongoing struggle for human rights and an essential milestone in a march that can be traced through women’s suffrage, the civil rights movement, and today’s debate over gay rights.

When Lincoln opens in select theaters on Friday (it opens nationally the following weekend), three days after American selects its next president, Spielberg hopes that it might contribute “some kind of soothing or even healing effect.” (“With malice towards none…” Lincoln famously said during his conciliatory second inaugural speech.) But Spielberg was wise to demand a post-election release, because the film will be inevitably interpreted through our modern political lens. READ FULL STORY

'The Guardian' presents the election, in awesome graphic novel form

Love politics, but hate having to wade through piles of boring text to get the information you crave? The Guardian has the solution: a virtual graphic novel that perfectly summarizes the 2012 presidential election.

This piece has everything — a timeline of events stretching back to the 2008 Republican primaries, cartoons that expertly convey Obama’s weariness, Romney’s determination, and Rick Santorum’s innate goofiness, and nifty little animations that are activated by a simple downward scroll. Perhaps the best part: “Texts from Hillary” makes an appearance. Really, just stop reading this and scroll through the whole thing.

Leave it to the American wing of a British company to come up with the coolest thing we’ve seen this election cycle. Is it too late to lobby for the U.S. to rejoin the U.K.?

Read more:
Vote! Google’s new Doodle wants you to
Celebrities rock the vote, urge you to do the same via Twitter
‘South Park’ makes bold election prediction with Wednesday’s ep, titled ‘Obama Wins!’

Celebrities rock the vote, urge you to do the same via Twitter

Merry Election Day! If your polling place is like mine, it took just eight minutes or so to participate in the democratic process this morning. If you live in Staten Island, New Jersey, Fairfax, Va., or any number of other places, voting might be a little more difficult. But no matter how long your wait or how bitter the cold, it’s important to cast a ballot — because if you don’t, you’ll be disappointing the dozens of celebrities who appeared in political PSAs this year. And do you really want to be responsible for making Selena Gomez and Jonah Hill cry?

Now that the day of reckoning has finally come, politically-minded celebs are out in full force urging normals to vote. They’re also putting their millions where their mouths are, voting themselves and then bragging about doing so on Twitter. (Unless, of course, they’re underage.) And then there are those who are treating the whole thing like a joke — just what we’d expect from Comedy Central’s best and brightest. Here are a few of our favorite Election Day tweets from boldfaced names:

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Bob Dylan predicts Barack Obama 'in a landslide'

Bob Dylan says he thinks President Barack Obama is going to win a landslide.

Dylan made the prediction Monday night midway through the song “Blowin’ in the Wind” during a concert in the battleground state of Wisconsin. READ FULL STORY

David Mamet wants Jewish-Americans to vote their conscience... for Mitt Romney

Stereotypes being what they are, when a Pulitzer-Prize winning and Oscar- and Tony-nominated writer tackles American electoral politics with his sharp pen, you typically expect to read an essay espousing liberal virtue. Not so with David Mamet. In an op-ed titled “A note to a stiff-necked people” that was recently published in the Los Angeles-based Jewish Journal, the writer of Glengarry Glen Ross, Speed-the-Plow, and The Verdict took fellow Jews to task for supporting Barack Obama. In a series of questions directed at the reliably liberal demographic, Mamet asks if Jewish-Americans are prepared to explain to their children how Obama’s policies will adversely impact them in the future: “Will you explain that whatever their personal beliefs, tax-funded institutions will require them to imbibe and repeat the slogans of the left, and that, should they differ, they cannot have a career in education, medicine, or television unless they keep their mouths shut?”

In the end, he reminds readers that despite what they’ve said to liberal-leaning friends about the presidential race — or felt compelled to say — our secret ballot allows us all to vote our conscience without retribution: “Should you, on reflection, vote in secret for a candidate you would not endorse in public, you will not be alone.” READ FULL STORY

On 'Hannity,' Clint Eastwood proves once more that he's better with a script -- VIDEO

Whether you agree or disagree with what he’s saying, the way Clint Eastwood speaks in his Romney Super PAC ad is impressively straightforward and effective. But when the Oscar winner goes off book — as in his famous appearance at the Republican National Convention this summer — he doesn’t sound quite so concise.

Case in point: Eastwood’s rambling appearance on Hannity last night, in which the Republican celeb reiterated his support for Governor Romney and his disapproval of President Obama. While Sean Hannity had no trouble articulating his own views — “I tried to warn people about who I thought Barack Obama was” in 2007 and 2008, he said — Eastwood’s responses to the host’s questions were rather muddled. For example, here’s the multi-hyphenate’s response when asked why he thinks Obama’s supporters have an emotional attachment to the president: “Well, I just think it’s important — there is — the American people deserve — they deserve the best. And they –  ’cause they are the best. And I’ve been lucky in my career to have their support, and I know a lot of other people have too in other lines of work.”

Not all of Eastwood’s appearance was that bad; he sounded confident and intelligible when praising Romney and Paul Ryan’s bona fides. Still, the following clip is a little tough to watch for anyone who’d rather remember the star in his Dirty Harry glory days.

READ FULL STORY

'30 Rock': The best lines from 'There's No I In America'

Hurricane Sandy rocked the East Coast and NBC’s prime-time lineup, giving us an all-new episode of 30 Rock on a Wednesday night instead of Thursday. The sheer madness! So in lieu of my usual 30 Rock recap, let’s get right down to business with the top 10 lines from “There’s No I In America.”

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Jon Hamm calls on Colorado residents to vote early

Jon Hamm is many things: Suave. Studly. Irresistible with a saxophone. But he’s also politically active. And he wants you to be, too! That is, if you’re a resident of the state of Colorado and an Obama supporter. The Mad Men star just released a YouTube video calling for Colorado voters to hit the polls early in advance of the Nov. 6 presidential election. It animates the whole process step-by-step, just in case viewers have forgotten how real mail works. Check it out after the jump.

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Mitt Romney: Late-night's most wanted

I’m not a right-winger, but I blame it all on Bill Clinton!

Back in June 1992, when the Arkansas governor’s first serious presidential bid was still in doubt, he popped up on Arsenio Hall to toot “Heartbreak Hotel” on his saxophone. It was his campaign’s effort to “go right to the people,” and by all measures, it worked. To be fair, Clinton wasn’t the first candidate to make a guest appearance on the tube to connect with voters — John F. Kennedy visited Jack Paar in 1960 and Richard Nixon mangled a punchline on Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In in 1968 — but once Clinton showed up on in his shades and belted out an Elvis tune, the power of television took over. Not only did he seem so much younger than his competition — George H.W. Bush and Ross Perot — but he seemed like a guy you’d want to be pals with. READ FULL STORY

Lena Dunham amused by reaction to her Barack Obama 'first time' ad

How did Girls creator Lena Dunham’s “Your first time shouldn’t be with just anybody, you want to do it with a great guy” vote-for-Obama ad go over with some conservatives? About as well as you’d expect:

If you missed the video when it was released Thursday, watch it below. READ FULL STORY

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