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Tag: Animation (1-10 of 276)

'Batman: Strange Days': Watch Bruce Timm's 75th Anniversary cartoon -- VIDEO

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Batman turns 75 in May. Parent company Warner Bros. plans to celebrate this anniversary by continuing to produce ridiculously successful Batman movies, TV shows, videogames, comic books, and pogs, or whatever kids today play with.

But also, they’ve just released a new short animated film created by the great Bruce Timm — the animation guru who was a key architect in the family of DC animated shows, including all-time-great Batman: The Animated Series and the maybe-better-if-you-don’t-mind-the-future Batman Beyond. The short is called Batman: Strange Days, and features Hugo Strange (get it?) and a lot of fog. Watch it below: READ FULL STORY

'Family Guy': Celebrate the best of times with our favorite Brian/Stewie moments -- VIDEOS

[Spoilers ahead!]

Brian’s sudden passing on the latest episode of Family Guy also marks the death of one of the core relationships of the series: between the loyal, family dog and the youngest and most nefarious Griffin, Stewie. We’ll miss that dynamic, but to celebrate the “Life of Brian,” here are some of our favorite Brian and Stewie buddy moments:
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'Simpsons' celebrates Marcia Wallace: 5 more of Mrs. Krabappel's best episodes

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When Fox announced that it would pay tribute to the late Marcia Wallace by re-airing one of her Simpsons character’s greatest episodes, there was only one logical choice: “Bart the Lover,” a gem from season 3 in which Bart plays a cruel prank on his teacher, Edna Krabappel, by answering her personal ad with a series of letters from a fake dreamboat named Woodrow. Like all the best episodes of The Simpsons, “Bart the Lover” is both hilarious and poignant. It also helped Wallace snag an Emmy in 1992. (She was nominated again in 1994 for a guest spot on Murphy Brown.)

But while “Bart the Lover” may be Mrs. Krabappel’s best showcase, it’s certainly not her only one. After all, Wallace voiced Edna in a staggering 178 episodes altogether, as of the new half-hour that will premiere Sunday. (The Simpsons plans to retire her character, though the show hasn’t yet explained how.)

So how can a Simpsons fan honor Springfield Elementary’s most bawdy, jaded, surprisingly sympathetic educator this weekend? First, get the name right; it’s kra-BA-ppel, not Crandall. Second, spend a few hours rewatching these five episodes, which represent the best of Edna. And sorry, “Nedna” fans, whoever you are; nothing about that random pairing makes the cut.

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'Harlem Shadow': Russell Simmons, Common team for Jazz Age animated hero series

Music and fashion mogul Russell Simmons says he has  October’s New York Comic-Con circled on his calendar for the first big reveal of The Harlem Shadow, a new animated online superhero series that will be set in the Jazz Age and features hip-hop star Common in the title voice role.

The series is an adaptation of the indie small-press series of the same name from RavenHammer Comics and the creative team of Brian Williams and Christian Colbert. (That version of the hero is shown in the poster image above.) After the Javitts Center debut, some early content will be online by year’s end at All Def Digital, the YouTube channel from Simmons and Brian Robbins of Awesomeness TV.
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Nick Offerman, brain-eating dinosaurs, and the wild world of Fox's late-night animation

Not many TV shows were specifically designed for the way many of us watch television today—namely, by watching for ten minutes on our iBrains, making GIFs of the best scenes, then flipping to the next show while we fight about the last one on Twitter. But Fox’s new Animation Domination High Def lineup, a late-night block of cartoons that premieres Saturday night, couldn’t be more suited to this kind of short-attention-span theater: the acronym spells out ADHD for a reason. The first two shows in the series, Axe Cop and High School USA!, are flat-screen-ready in all their two-dimensional glory, and they’re only ten minutes long (not counting commercials), so they’re grouped into a brightly-colored, highly-imaginative half-hour showcase that should appeal to children, stoners, and anyone else who can appreciate the appeal of Parks and Recreation‘s Nick Offerman playing an axe-wielding cop who fights bad guys by getting dinosaurs to eat their brains. (More on that later.) Through the ADHD web site, which was designed by the awesomely primitivist, neon-loving art collective Paper Rad, you can create your own GIFs with the ghost of Steve Jobs or watch any number of deeply strange and funny animated shorts. (My personal favorite is called “Gosh Josh! Weird Beard!”) Or if you’re an old person like me, you can just blow the archeological-dig dust off your remote control and watch ADHD on an actual television set during its intended time slot, just like our ancestors did.

Not too long ago, Fox led the charge in making cutting-edge cartoons. But now that Adult Swim regularly churns out innovative series like the existential stop-motion saga Morel Orel and the blaxploitation saga Black Dynamite: The Animated Series, Fox classics like The Simpsons and Family Guy look quaint by comparison. So it makes sense that Fox tapped Adult Swim’s Nick Weidenfeld, who produced Morel, Dynamite, and cult hits like Childrens Hospital, to run its ADHD block, with Adult Swim alumnus Dinos Stamatopoulos (that’s Star-Burns to you Community fans) creating one of its first shows. High School USA! is an Archie spoof that’s updated for Millennials, complete with sexting jokes, teenage girls who are BFFs with their moms, and that special brand of rah-rah enthusiasm that can only belong to a generation raised on whole-wheat Cheerios cereals and self-esteem.

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Solo and childless: Why I almost didn't watch 'Despicable Me 2'

Before this weekend, it had been more than two years since I’d watched an animated film on its opening weekend. Why? Because I hate going to watch family films alone.

I put my feelings of self-consciousness aside yesterday so I could go see Despicable Me 2, partly because I’d enjoyed the first one (screened on Netflix, fyi) and partly because I wanted to face my fears of going to a movie for kids without a kid. “It’s all in your head,” I told myself. But that wasn’t entirely true.  READ FULL STORY

Gets Better Every Time: 'It's so fluffy I'm gonna diiiiie!' -- VIDEO

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With Despicable Me 2 now in theaters, those highlighter-yellow, pill-shaped leetle minions — who have their own spinoff in the works — are poised to suck up all the attention. Good for them. They earned it (and were named by EW as some the 15 Biggest Animated Scene-Stealers of all time). But, credit where credit’s due, we shouldn’t let this day pass without remembering the unsung hero of the franchise: Agnes. With her unicorn obsession and spiky sprig of hair, the scrappy orphan expresses the innocent ebullience of childhood better than anyone. To wit, there’s one moment from the first film that shows how sometimes glee simply cannot be contained. Check your frown at the door, click through, and soak up the giddy goodness:
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The Horrifying Tab I Couldn't Close All Week: Disney Princesses' heads exploding

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When I was younger, I’d imagine Snow White leaning juuuust a bit too far into the well, or human Ariel ironically drowning under her oppressive wall of bangs, or the mice turning on Cinderella and devouring her in her sleep (thanks a lot, cheese curd remnants). But nothing like this. The Disney Princesses’ Heads Exploding video was easily the most horrifying Internet oddity I’ve seen all week. READ FULL STORY

Lucille Bluth vs. the Disney Princesses

So I went a little nuts with Vine!

Boozy-witchy Bluth matriarch Lucille has generously taken time out of her day-drinking to snap some sense into the damsels of Disney. They could all stand to lose some weight, by the way. You want your belt to buckle, not your chair. (Click the microphones on and off to hear the audio.) READ FULL STORY

Peter Parker with a bong? Joe Casey springs 'The Bounce' -- FIRST LOOK

When readers first met young Peter Parker, back in 1962 on the opening page of Amazing Fantasy No. 15, he’s wearing spectacles, carrying schoolbooks and listening too hard to the latest insult.

It’s a little different when readers are greeted by young Jasper Jenkins – the title character of Joe Casey’s The Bounce – in our exclusive preview of the first issue. Instead of eyeglasses, he’s got glassy eyes and the object in his hand looks suspiciously like a three-foot bong. He’s also ignoring the latest lecture. “With great power comes great responsibility” still applies — but in the case of this 21st century slacker soul, it may also be accompanied by metahuman munchies.

NOTE: The preview pages below contain R-rated language and drug use. READ FULL STORY

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