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Tag: Academy Awards (1-10 of 31)

Analyzing 87 years of Oscar, by the numbers

Forget December: This is truly the most wonderful time of the year, provided you’re a movie nut. (And if you aren’t… uh, what are you doing here, buddy?) Oscar season is a joyous occasion marked by nail-biting anticipation, spirited debate (Boyhood or Birdman?), many, many sparkly things—and, for the truly devoted, friendly little competitions about who knows the most Oscar-related trivia.

Thankfully, EW has your back. In our Oscar nominations double issue, we crunched the numbers to give you a few fun stats about four major categories—Best Picture, Actor, Actress, and Supporting Actor—as well as one special box all about the Academy’s most celebrated member: Meryl Streep, who keeps beating her own record for history’s most-nominated actress. Check them out below—and feel free to crib from these charts when the show airs Feb. 22. READ FULL STORY

Nominated for Nothing: 'Snowpiercer'

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Just about every year, brilliant movies are utterly ignored by the Oscars. The Searchers, Groundhog Day, Breathless, King Kong, Casino Royale, Touch of Evil, Caddyshack, Mean Streets, The Big Lebowski, Blackfish — the Academy has a long history of overlooking comedies, action movies, horror flicks, hard-boiled genre pics, artsy foreign films, and documentaries that aren’t about World War II. Before the ceremony, we’ll be taking a closer look at films that were too small, too weird, or perhaps simply too awesome for the Academy Awards. These are the Non-Nominees.

The film: Bong Joon-ho’s Snowpiercer is the story of mankind’s devolution after a plan to counteract global warming backfires, transforming the entire planet into a deadly Arctic tundra. Before all was lost, a billionaire named Wilfred built a behemoth of a train to save the remainders of humanity—and quite literally compartmentalize them by class. The suffering 99 percent is held like cattle in the back of the train—nearly starved, worked to the bone, completely dehumanized, and told to shut up and be grateful, or pay dearly for their insubordination. Meanwhile, the elite one percent luxuriate in their vast front-of-the-train libraries, gourmet sushi restaurants, and plush jazz bars.

Curtis (Chris Evans) and company, with nothing to lose after 17 years of oppression, are sparked by acts of cruelty to revolt by attempting to make their way to the train’s engine. The film’s all-star cast also features Tilda Swinton, John Hurt, Jamie Bell, Octavia Spencer, Ed Harris, Ewen Bremner and South Korean star Kang-ho Song. READ FULL STORY

Chelsea Handler: 'I'm not racist. I date a lot of black people' -- VIDEO

Despite what her Oscar tweets may have indicated, Chelsea Handler is emphatically not a racist — at least, according to Chelsea Handler.

“People are mad at me all the time. If I was worried about that, then I would be spending a lot of time online. I’d rather be a little bit more productive,” she explained to George Stephanopoulos on Good Morning America Tuesday, after he brought up her controversial Academy Award-night comments — including this message about Sunday’s Best Supporting Actress winner: “#AngelinaJolie just filed adoption papers #lupitanyongo #Oscars -@chelseahandler.”

Okay, cool! Thanks for clearing that up, Chelsea. This would be the perfect time to change the subject. Right? Right?

Yeah, no. “I’m not racist,” the comedian continued, laughing as though the very idea were utterly ludicrous. “I date a lot of black people, so that would be a difficult thing to explain to them.” Palm, meet face.

READ FULL STORY

Oscars 2014: Toast tonight's awards with these Academy-inspired cocktails

It’s Oscar night, PopWatchers! Time to celebrate in style with with a host of cocktails inspired by the movies the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has anointed from the past year. Sip these cultural concoctions at your own pace (the ceremony will be more than three hours long, after all) or spice things up by playing our original drinking game. The Best Picture race may be tight, but EW’s bar is wide open. Cheers to Hollywood!  READ FULL STORY

Inside the Best Picture nominees: A deep dive into 'The Wolf of Wall Street'

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Name: The Wolf of Wall Street

Release date: Dec. 25, 2013

DVD release date: March 25, 2014

Run time: 2 hours, 59 minutes

Box office: Opening weekend: $18.4 million; Total domestic box office: $113 million; Worldwide gross to date: $338.5 million

Rotten Tomatoes score: 77 percent READ FULL STORY

Inside the Best Picture Nominees: A deep dive into '12 Years a Slave'

Name: 12 Years a Slave

Release date: Oct. 18, 2003 (limited); Nov. 8, 2013 (wide)

DVD release date: March 4, 2014

Run time: 134 minutes

Box office: Opening weekend, wide release: $6.675 million; domestic total: $49.133 million; international total: $78.9 million (as of Monday, Feb. 24)

Rotten Tomatoes score: 96 percent READ FULL STORY

Inside the Best Picture nominees: A deep dive into 'Her'

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Name: Her

Run time: 2 hours, 6 minutes

DVD release date: Unknown

Box office: Domestic — $23.5 million, Foreign — $4.1 million

Rotten Tomatoes score: 94 percent

Her movie math: (Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind + Smart House) x (Like Crazy + Lost in Translation)

Tweetable description: A man and his wife break up and he turns to his sultry-voiced OS for love — and finds it.

What Chris Nashawaty said : “Jonze’s satiric, brave-new-world premise is undeniably clever, but it’s also a bit icy emotionally. He clearly has a lot on his mind about how seductive technology is and how much easier life would be if we could insulate ourselves from messy human emotions. But in the end, those ideas end up appealing to your head more than your heart.”

Number of Oscar nods: 5 — Best Picture, Best Original Score, Best Original Song for Karen O’s “The Moon Song,” Best Production Design, Best Original Screenplay

Her‘s Oscar history: Her writer and director Spike Jonze got a Best Director nod for 1999’s Being John Malkovich. Producer Megan Ellison is in the Best Picture running with not only Her, but also American Hustle, and she was part of the team nominated for their work with Zero Dark Thirty, when the film was nominated for Best Picture last year.

What it has won thus far: Jonze’s screenplay has fared well: It’s won 13 different awards, including a Golden Globe last month.

Why it should win: Her is a look at our future — not too subtle, but also not so overwhelmingly out-there that we can’t connect with it. That’s an accomplishment in itself. But more than that, it’s a new kind of love story that veers away from Notebook-like sentimentality in favor of just plain, raw emotion. It’s enjoyable to watch (the colors! the music! the voices!), and it makes you honestly consider humans’ relationship with technology.

Why it shouldn’t win: At its core, Her is a story about heartbreak and love, and that’s relatable to anyone. But it’s also a movie about heartbreak and love, which seems trivial compared to some of the other nominees — say Dallas Buyers Club or 12 Years a Slave  — that revolve around life-or-death drama and use individuals to show how they were affected by real-life, widespread issues like AIDS and slavery. It’s hard to say that what is essentially a romantic comedy deserves to win when those are its competitors.

Vegas Odds: 150/1, according to Las Vegas Sports Betting

Best line: Anything the hilarious foul-mouthed video game alien says. Plus, when Theodore (Joaquin Phoenix) shares his totally understandable fear: “Sometimes I think I have felt everything I’m ever gonna feel, and from here on out, I’m not gonna feel anything new. Just lesser versions of what I’ve already felt.”

Worst line: When Theodore tells his friend Amy (Amy Adams) that he’s dating his OS and when he gets self-conscious about it, she replies: “I think anybody who falls in love is a freak. It’s a crazy thing to do. It’s kind of like a form of socially acceptable insanity.” Sure, it’s a cute line, but it also sounds like something you’d see written over a “romantic” photo on Tumblr. Pass.

Inside the Best Picture nominees: A deep dive into 'Dallas Buyers Club'

Name: Dallas Buyers Club

Release date: Nov. 1, 2013

DVD release date: Feb. 4, 2014

Run time: 1 hour, 57 mins

Box office: Limited opening weekend: $260,865; Wide opening weekend: $2.7 million; Total domestic box office: $24.4 million; Worldwide gross to date: $30.4 million

Rotten Tomatoes score: 94 percent

Dallas Buyers Club movie math: (And the Band Played On + No Country for Old Men) x (Blow + Glen or Glenda + The Machinist)

Tweetable description: If Ron Woodruff only had 30 days left to live, you know what he’d do? Start an HIV treatment drug ring and live for seven years. #NBD READ FULL STORY

The 10 most high-powered Oscar races of the last 25 years

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Most Academy Awards hand out five nominations apiece. Some awards only hand out three; a few years ago, the Academy opened up the Best Picture race to like a million nominees. But the specific number doesn’t really matter. Most races inevitably come down to some kind of face-off between two nominees: Frontrunner vs. Dark Horse, Beloved Veteran vs. Dynamic Newcomer, Megahit vs. Beloved Smaller Film, Dark Tale Of The Modern World vs. Sentimental Nostalgia Bait.

Each year, though there are races that defy any easy binary rendering. These are the categories that stacked almost too high with talent. Sometimes that’s clear right away, and the category becomes that year’s Race To Watch media narrative. More often, it only becomes clear with the benefit of hindsight: The five nominees for a supporting Oscar become iconic faces of the ensuing decade, or the musical score of all five nominated films become synonymous with trailer-ready emotional cues. READ FULL STORY

Oscars 2014 will celebrate heroes -- many of whom will likely be in the room

For this year’s Oscars, it will be an ode to the honorable.

Producers Craig Zadan and Neil Meron announced Tuesday that this year’s Academy Awards will have a movie hero theme. Meron made the announcement through an Instagram video saying the night would be a celebration of all heroes: popular heroes, real-life heroes, animated heroes, and superheroes.

Does that mean we can expect host Ellen DeGeneres in a Wonder Woman suit? Probably not. However, many of the stars in contention for Oscars this year have already played heroic parts. Here is a look at some of the best (cape not required):
READ FULL STORY

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