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Renee Zellweger, Reese Witherspoon Walk to Defeat ALS

This summer, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis—also known as ALS and Lou Gehrig’s Disease—got a big awareness boost with the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. Sunday morning, the ALS Association hosted its Walk to Defeat ALS event, keeping that momentum going.

“Our goal for today is to raise awareness of ALS and raise funding to support people who are living with ALS and to support research,” said Fred Fisher, President and CEO of the ALS Association Golden West Chapter. “The more money that we can raise, the more people we can help and the more research we can fund.”

The walk, held in Los Angeles near Exposition Park, had an impressive turnout, with about 2,500 participants signed up by registration close. Fisher estimated that between 3,000 to 5,000 people ultimately turned up to walk or to cheer on family and friends. READ FULL STORY

'The Walking Dead' haunted house scared the bejeezus out of me

Keeping up to date on all things Walking Dead means more than just reading the comic and watching the TV show. Sometimes it means living it as well. I did that a few years ago when I went undercover as a zombie on the show back in season 2, although that bastard Robert Kirkman ended up cutting my scene because “the performance just wasn’t there.” Screw that. So this time I decided to switch sides and join the survivors and see if I could escape the clutches (and, more importantly, jaws) of the undead by walking through Rick’s — and Daryl’s and Carol’s and Glenn’s — shoes at The Walking Dead: End of the Line haunted house at Universal Orlando’s Halloween Horror Nights.

All the houses at HHN consist of monsters or demons or vampires or aliens or predators or serial killers or clowns — CLOWNS! — totally invading your personal space and jumping out at you…often with blunt instruments of death at their disposal. It is unsetting. But I was especially excited to check out The Walking Dead one because the maze is a complete retelling of the events of season 4. So what awaits you in The Walking Dead: End of the Line? A few terrifying highlights: READ FULL STORY

Every 'Simpsons' 'Treehouse of Horror' short, ranked

Update: The list has been amended to include the three segments from “Treehouse of Horror XXV.”

That’s right: In honor of The Simpsons‘ 25th (!) annual Halloween special, EW didn’t just rank the top 25 “Treehouse of Horror” segments. We took things a step further by ranking every single “Treehouse” segment ever seen on the show—and you’ll find entries 72 through 26 in the list below.

Even when longtime fans sniff that The Simpsons‘ Golden Age is long past, they can agree that late-period Simpsons Halloween shows still pack a punch. Why? Because “Treehouse” segments give the series’ writers a break in two ways: First of all, they’re short, which means that they can explore plot threads that are amusing but too flimsy to support an entire half-hour. And secondly, they’re not bound by the laws of canon (or taste), giving the show’s staff an opportunity to follow their wildest whims—transforming Springfield into a town as drawn by Dr. Seuss, or putting a gremlin on the side of Bart’s schoolbus, or transforming Homer’s head into a giant doughnut.

What makes a good “Treehouse” short? Punchy one-liners and visual gags help, but the best of the bunch have two more things in common: Novel premises (which, admittedly, get increasingly difficult as the show ages) and a genuine stab at including a few real scares. (In other words: The recent trend toward parodies of random movies that have little or nothing to do with horror as a broad category just doesn’t do it.) You’ll find what made the cut in the list below, as well as what maybe should have been left on the cutting-room floor.

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So there's a new rumor about 'Batman v Superman'...

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice is a long title for a movie. But given how many superheroes are definitely or probably showing up in the 2016 superhero film, a more accurate title would probably be Batman v Superman v Wonder Woman v Cyborg v an Aquaman cameo v The Flash probably. Warner Bros. has not been shy about promoting their incipient DC Cinematic Universe, and so at this point we should not be surprised by any rumors about a new beloved DC icon joining the film. READ FULL STORY

GamerGate is happening because we let it happen

Maybe you’ve heard of GamerGate.

Countless stories have been written about the controversy over the past two months—yes, it started that long ago—in outlets ranging from game-centric titles to our biggest national publications. GamerGate has gone mainstream in a big way, but it remains elusive and difficult to understand. If you’re someone who would like to know just what GamerGate entails, check out this exhaustive piece by Deadspin writer Kyle Wagner. It’s long, but it’s also evenhanded and nuanced. Anyone who tries to break the whole mess down in a bite-sized YouTube video or nifty imgur link is probably trying to mislead you.

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The 'I Am Bread' video game is exactly what you think it is

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One of the best things about video games is how they allow you to experience things from truly unique perspectives—playing characters that come from an entirely different racial, religious, or socioeconomic background as yourself, allowing for deep insight and empathy when done right.

Now, you can also play as a slice of bread.

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Entertainment Geekly: 'Pulp Fiction,' the video store, and the evolution of movie history

My new apartment doesn’t have internet or cable, because I don’t know if I want internet or cable. “Not wanting cable” is so hot right now. This week, CBS and HBO announced their intentions to launch streaming-only services. Pause to imagine your retired grandparents who watch NCIS: New Orleans but prefer NCIS: LA. Now pause to imagine your prodigal-son cousin who stars in a hipster off-Broadway nude-rap opera. (He plays a a cross-dressing hooker named Threeyoncé.) Now pause to imagine that they both suddenly agree on everything—because when the most successful TV network and the TV network so cool that it constantly claims it’s not a TV network both agree that the future is streaming, then “television” as a concept really is just becoming a concept. (Lest we needed further proof: It might feel like Friends is always on TV, but now Friends will literally always be on Netflix.) READ FULL STORY

Here's an 18-year-old Channing Tatum stripping at a club in Florida

It’s one thing to know that Channing Tatum got some of his Magic Mike moves from his days as a real-life stripper, and it’s an entirely separate thing to then watch an 18-year-old Channing Tatum—who went by his stage name Chan Crawford—grind on middle-aged women and rock a neon thong. But thanks to Us Weekly, we now know exactly what the latter feels like.

Thanks to a video of Tatum dancing at a Florida club called Male Encounter, we can now analyze how he has grown as a dancer. The takeaways? Tatum was a little more flexible as a teen and definitely into the flow-y hip movement—weren’t we all? And just generally, there was a lot more happening with his hands. Then again, that’s probably because he didn’t know what to do with all of the extremely baggy clothes on his hot bod. Welcome to 1999 everybody, where the party never stops and the clothing never fits.

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Ron Perlman talks Connery, Brando, and whether he's watching 'Sons'

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As the title of Ron Perlman’s memoir Easy Street (the Hard Way) implies, the actor—whose Amazon pilot, Hand of God, recently got a season order and who voices a character in the Guillermo del Toro-produced animated feature The Book of Life now in theaters—has a life story full of ups and downs. “The book is very much about how every time something really, really bad happens, there’s a resolve that takes place as you heal your way out of it,” he says. “One of my favorite quotes, which is really representative of the book, is that I really never learned anything while I was succeeding; I always learned everything while I was failing, when everything was going bad, when the wheels were completely off the bus, and I had no idea how I was gonna get out of it. Somehow you do. And in doing so, you find out so much about yourself, so much about whatever spiritual thing you have going.”

The toughest chapters for him to pen with cowriter Michael Largo were those about the loss of his father at 19 to heart disease and the mental health issues in his family (including his own serious battle with depression). But he also makes it clear in the book that he struggled with how deep to go into his feelings about the isolation and discomfort he experienced on-screen and off during the end of his run on Sons of Anarchy. Did he give anyone a heads-up about that section of the book? “I don’t think any heads-up was necessary,” he says with a laugh. “We all lived through the same s–t.” And no, he’s not watching the show’s final ride. “I’d say there’s 15-20 percent of my work that I’ve never seen because I’m one of these guys that has a much better time doing it than watching it. And when I watch it, I’m not able to watch it objectively,” he says. “So the short answer to that is, I haven’t really watched Sons since season 4, or something like that. I didn’t even watch it when I was on it, so I certainly ain’t watching it when I ain’t,” he says with another laugh.

We got Perlman to share a few of our favorite stories from the book—spitting in Sean Connery’s face in The Name of the Rose and interacting with Marlon Brando on the set of The Island of Dr. Moreau—when he visited EW for an installment of Firsts & Worsts. Watch the video and read the transcript below. READ FULL STORY

J.K. Rowling plans to build a 'Hagrid hut' on her Scottish estate

Apparently not content to have simply invented the world of Harry Potter, J.K. Rowling is constructing it too.

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