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Advocacy group for shy bladder syndrome is upset about Rob Lowe ad

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Rob Lowe is wearing pants up to his belly button. His hair is parted in the middle, and he has a fanny pack fastened around his waist. He’s standing at a urinal and looks at the camera with a shy smile: “I can’t pee with other people in the room,” he admits. This is the nerdy version of Rob Lowe featured in a new DirecTV commercial, and this is the scene that upset an advocacy group for shy bladder syndrome.

“Shy bladder syndrome” affects, by the International Paruresis Association‘s estimates, 7 percent of the U.S. population. People with the syndrome have a hard time urinating if other people are nearby, and the CEO of that association, Steve Soifer, thinks the DirecTV ad is making light of that struggle. READ FULL STORY

Clay Aiken loses congressional race, gains docu-series

Clay Aiken may have lost the congressional race in North Carolina, but he gained a consolation prize in the process: a four-hour docu-series.

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'Orange is the New Black' star Lea DeLaria yells back at a subway preacher

Orange is the New Black‘s Big Boo—known in the real world as comedian Lea DeLaria—did something we all want to do but usually don’t: She yelled at someone annoying her on the subway, according to a video submitted to Gothamist.

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Allison Janney, Anna Faris to host People's Choice Awards

Mom stars Allison Janney and Anna Faris are set to host 2015’s People’s Choice Awards, an annual event that recognizes talent in the worlds of television, film, and music. READ FULL STORY

Jimmy Kimmel does his annual Halloween prank, kids cry about it again

Four years later and not much has changed. Once again, Jimmy Kimmel asked his viewers to tell their children that they ate all of their Halloween candy and record their children’s reactions. There aren’t any adorable brothers this year, but there is a child that says “f— you, mother f—er,” so clearly, society is on the decline.

Watch “I Told My Kids I Ate All Their Halloween Candy 2014″ below.

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Jim Davis talks 'Garfield' origins, holiday specials, and calls Garfield 'a human in a cat suit'

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Cats have invaded every corner of modern pop culture, from Internet memes to Taylor Swift’s life—but there’s one quintessential feline who’s been a mainstay for generations. Jim Davis’s Garfield has made lasagna and sarcasm synonymous with cats for over three decades, appearing in comics for 2,100 newspapers worldwide and 200 million readers (not to mention TV series and feature films).

In a nostalgic reissue, Davis and his Garfield empire, Paws Inc., have compiled five Garfield holiday specials into one DVD: Garfield’s Halloween Adventure, Garfield’s Thanksgiving, A Garfield Christmas, Garfield on the Town, and Garfield in Paradise. To commemorate the occasion, Davis spoke to EW about Garfield’s human-like mannerisms, growing up with 25 cats in Indiana, and what he really thinks about Mondays. Oh, and in case you were wondering: He’s a lot more like Garfield’s friendly owner, Jon Arbuckle, than the timelessly wry kitty.

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Ask Dalton: On striking up a conversation with celebrities, and other queries

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Is it okay to approach a celebrity out in public? And how obligated should one feel to keep multitaskers up to speed as to what’s happening on screen? Dalton Ross, EW editor-at-large and resident pop-culture referee, weighs in.

I’ve seen celebs in stores. I just smile and nod, maybe say hello. I don’t want to bother them. Is it ever okay to begin a convo?
—Sue (@Soozey42)

Your instincts are generally spot-on, Sue. Here’s the thing about actors: They like attention. By the nature of their profession, they got into the business to be noticed and have accolades thrown their way. Let’s face it, you don’t get up on that stage in your middle-school production of You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown unless you crave the spotlight. (For example, I played Linus.) READ FULL STORY

Watch Nick Offerman play an argument-defusing Home Depot employee

Nick Offerman plays an incredibly soothing Home Depot employee in a fake commercial John Oliver produced for Last Week Tonight to prove how Home Depot should be thinking about its marketing strategy in light of the sales robots Lowe’s is touting.  READ FULL STORY

'Saturday Night Live' best host poll: Let the 4th annual vote begin!

With Saturday Night Live celebrating its 40th anniversary this year, we’ve already spent a lot of time reflecting on the show’s biggest all-time stars and funniest sketches. But fairly or unfairly, the success of every Saturday Night Live episode depends not on the show’s ensemble, but on a given episode’s celebrity host—who’s put through a live-comedy wringer that can be as exhilarating and unforgiving as Indiana Jones’ race through the booby-trapped South American temple in Raiders of the Lost Ark. Obviously, it’s the cast and the writers’ responsibility to put the host in position to thrive. With one false move, he or she can get crushed by a bad joke or lifeless reading—the SNL equivalent of a giant stampeding boulder.

Still, not all hosts are created equal. There’s a reason there’s both a Five-Timer’s Club—Alec Baldwin! Justin Timberlake! Steve Martin!—and a less-tony One-Timer’s Club. (Shall we call the latter the Louise Lasser Club? Or does Milton Berle deserve that infamy?) Today, five episodes into SNL‘s 40th season, EW begins its fourth annual Mr. Saturday Night contest—in which voters determine the best host of the current season. Previous seasons have crowned Jimmy Fallon, Timberlake, and Fallon again, which I think both validates the current voting process and invites us to consider some fresh blood. READ FULL STORY

Cory Michael Smith on 'Olive Kitteridge,' the celebrity autograph he still has

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For fans of Gotham, Cory Michael Smith is known as Edward Nygma, but on Sunday night, he will set aside his riddles to appear in a new miniseries from HBO titled Olive Kitteridge.

In the four-part miniseries, based on the book by the same name, Frances McDormand stars at the title character. The series tells the story of her life, her relationship with her husband (Richard Jenkins), and her interactions with others in her small town, all spanning over 25 years. And in part two of the miniseries, viewers will meet Kevin Coulson, Smith’s character. READ FULL STORY

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