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Entertainment Geekly: 'Doctor Who' is the saddest show on television

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Those people down there. They’re never small to me. Don’t make assumptions about how far I will go to protect them, because I’ve already come a very long way. And unlike you, I do not expect to reach the Promised Land.

About two years ago, I found Doctor Who on Netflix. This is a classic better-late-than-never situation. At that point, the Doctor Who notioncalling it a “franchise” feels reductivehad been in a perpetual state of existence for 49 years. Long story short, assuming you don’t know: Time-traveling alien named the Doctor goes on adventures. Real name unknown, possibly forgotten. Long story slightly longer: The time-traveling alien is also a shape-changing immortal, and “death” is just a momentary glowing-light distraction before the alien’s rebirth, with a new body, a new attitude, and a new fashion sense. READ FULL STORY

Poll: Which 'Walking Dead' magazine cover is your favorite?

This week, EW got the exclusive first look at Walking Dead‘s upcoming season, and to accompany that, EW also put out four different Walking Dead covers for readers to choose from. There’s Norman Reedus’ Daryl, bloodied and jumping in the air; there’s Andrew Lincoln’s Rick ready to punch. There’s Danai Gurira’s Michonne waving her sword; there’s Steven Yeun’s Glenn and Lauren Cohan’s Maggie teaming up. Essentially, there’s every Walking Dead cover you could ever want.

And now we want to know: Which is your favorite? Take the poll below to let us know, and then head to newsstands Aug. 29 to buy your chosen cover—or all of them.  READ FULL STORY

This Week's Cover: An inside look at season 5 of 'The Walking Dead'

Andrew Lincoln has a warning for you: All that gore and action and heartbreak and intensity we’ve seen before on The Walking Dead? Kid stuff. At least when compared to the upcoming fifth season, which is definitely not for kids. “We’re really earning our rating this season,” says Lincoln. “There are families that watch it together, but just so it’s on the record, guys—it’s a grown-up show this season.”

Entertainment Weekly has your first exclusive look at that grown-up season. We went on set and spoke with the cast and the producers to give you an in depth look at what to expect in season five. And while things may have ended last spring on a cliffhanger with Rick and Co. trapped inside of train car, exec producer Robert Kirkman promises that the action is going to come fast and furious when things pick back up Oct. 12 on AMC. “By minute two or three of our season premiere, I think the vast majority of our questions have been answered,” says Kirkman, “and five or six more have been presented, so you’re very much going to be invested, well-informed, and ready for the ride that we’re going to take you on.” READ FULL STORY

Billy Eichner talks the making of his Emmys segment

One of the standout moments from this year’s Emmys was undeniably the taped segment in which comedian Billy Eichner and host Seth Meyers ran around the streets of New York quizzing (or simply yelling at) people about the awards. And it wouldn’t have happened if Eichner had not decided to send a “ballsy” (his word) email to Meyers’ producer, Mike Shoemaker.

But thanks to Eichner’s initiative, the evening had a refreshing dose of absurdity. In the segment, which mimicked the structure of the recurring games on Eichner’s Billy on the Street, Eichner called out the Academy’s snubbing of Tatiana Maslany, Elisabeth Moss, The Mindy Project, and The Good Wife, screamed about the ceremony’s hottest races (“Dinklage versus Patinkin!”), and pushed someone who didn’t want to talk about Judging Amy aside.

READ FULL STORY

Emmys poll: Who should host in 2015?

Hosting a major awards show is a thankless task. Just ask David Letterman and Seth MacFarlane. (Don’t even bother asking James Franco.) Seth Meyers, who won almost unanimous praise for hosting the White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner in 2011, received mixed reviews in his first stint as Emmy host Monday night, with his hometown tabloid detractors pointing to a perception of passiveness that yielded the stage to other, more dynamic performers. But perhaps he should be commended for sharing the spotlight so generously, letting others shine, and keeping the three-hour show moving. Nothing wrong with getting by with a little help from one’s friends, especially when such friends are as funny as Amy Poehler, Andy Samberg, et al.

Looking at Meyers’ Emmys from a raw data perspective, his numbers were solid. He couldn’t compete with last year’s CBS telecast, which was hosted by Neil Patrick Harris, but his show’s 10.9 rating was the second most-watched Emmys in eight years. Perhaps the audience would’ve been even larger if the Emmys had aired on the traditional Sunday night. (Or perhaps not, with stronger competition from Sunday night’s water-cooler cable shows.)

Either way, I’ll give Meyers a passing grade—though EW‘s critics were less generous—and am already looking ahead to 2015’s Emmys. Who should host next year? READ FULL STORY

Will Cary Joji Fukunaga's man braids spawn copy cats?

Since Jared Leto didn’t walk the red carpet at Monday’s Emmys, another man’s locks had to be an object of obsession. Thank goodness True Detective director Cary Joji Fukunaga was on hand—and donning some excellent braids. Fukunaga won an award last night for directing the episode “Who Goes There,” but his hair emerged as the most talked about element of his appearance on the broadcast. Has the man bun given way to man braids?

The former has been around for longer than you think—The New York Times had a man bun trend piece back in 2012—and it shows no evidence of going out of style: Kit Harington trotted out the bun on the red carpet yesterday, while Leo DiCaprio donned one in his ice bucket challenge video. Still, Fukunaga’s braids sent corners of the Internet into a frenzy, perhaps heralding a new age of hipster men’s hairstyles. READ FULL STORY

A brief history of Lead Actress in a Comedy Emmy shenanigans

At the Emmys, lead actresses officially have the most fun. This year’s make out session between Julia Louis-Dreyfus and Bryan Cranston is just the latest stunt pulled by the funny ladies nominated in the Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series category. Louis-Drefyus has been the main perpetrator of the category’s goofiness in recent years—but the legacy of shenanigans precedes her now three-year winning streak.  Let’s look back at the greatest hits. READ FULL STORY

Chris Harrison blogs 'Bachelor in Paradise' episode 4

Another week in Paradise, another week of enjoying the beautiful beaches, the perfect weather, the great activities that the Yucatan peninsula has to offer, and of course, the ups and downs of love and relationships. We begin this week seeing one of my favorite couples in Bachelor history—Graham and Michelle Money. These two serve as a crisp taco shell to wrap this episode, but we will get to that later. I know that Graham and Michelle may not count as a “couple” since they are not romantically involved (anymore), but they are such great friends that it’s fun to watch their dynamic and undying support of each other. Michelle was the source of much entertainment this week. (What else is new?) You gotta love a girl who will take the hit of not being taken on a date with Robert and then do the hair of the woman who did get asked. As Money says, “(it’s) tough, but I’ll make your braid look awesome.” Yeah, I bet that braid is pulling extra tight on Sarah’s head. READ FULL STORY

Ranking the Emmy acceptance speeches

The Emmys honor the best performances on television, but the telecast is all about celebrating the best speeches. Here’s how we called it:

1. Breaking Bad‘s Bryan Cranston, Lead Actor in a Drama Series: It was Cranston’s night. He had the perfect amount of humility (“Even I thought about voting for Matthew”), humor (“I love you, especially those scenes in bed,” he told Anna Gunn) and inspiration (find your passion, Sneaky Petes).  READ FULL STORY

Billy Crystal remembers Robin Williams during Emmys

Billy Crystal remembered Robin Williams, who died Aug. 11 at 63, during the Emmys memorial segment Monday evening.

Before Crystal’s tribute, the Emmys also remembered other stars who died this year, including Paul Walker, James Avery, Ann B. Davis, Shirley Temple, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Lauren Bacall, and Sid Caesar, in a video segment that played as Sara Bareilles sang Nat King Cole’s “Smile” live.

The video segment ended on a photo of Robin Williams as Billy Crystal began his tribute onstage. “He made us laugh. Hard,” Crystal started. “Every time you saw him.” Crystal and Williams starred in 1997 comedy Fathers’ Day together and also both had supporting roles in 1996’s Hamlet. READ FULL STORY

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