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Watch outtakes from Dave Franco and Conan O'Brien's Tinder bit

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Conan O’Brien recently enlisted Dave Franco to go on a Tinder adventure with him. The stars set up profiles using fake names—Chip Whitley for O’Brien; Djengus Roundstone for Franco—and new profile pictures, then got to it. And by “got to it,” we mean they tried very hard to find a woman who would agree to meet up with them.

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Video: Dean Cain explains why an episode of 'The Brady Bunch' pissed him off

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Fans of VH1’s Hit the Floor (Mondays at 9 p.m. ET) last saw Dean Cain’s pro basketball coach Pete Davenport unconscious in his bed after another bender. Cain can’t tell you if Peter lives or dies, but he can share a great story about how his house was built as a direct response to an episode of The Brady Bunch that infuriated him.  READ FULL STORY

What 'The Leftovers' could learn from 'Battlestar Galactica' about grief

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It’s always a challenge when a television show kills off a sizable portion of humanity in its first episodes. I don’t mean to be flip about that proposition—it’s just there’s a certain series format, seen most recently in The Leftovers, in which the action begins after a near-apocalyptic event has run its course and then the substance of the show deals with whatever follows.

Some do it better than others. In HBO’s case, that calamity comes through a rapture of sorts: Two percent of the world’s population disappears into thin air. What follows is grief—the sudden evaporation of bodies leaves everyone in the town of Mapleton, New York, gasping for spiritual air.  The Leftovers hits hard, but so far it has struggled to weave its intersecting set of individual traumas into cohesive web of collective grief. Perhaps the feeling of empty randomness, even in the plot, is part of the point, but it also misses one if the great advantages of serialized television: the ability to build memorials, and to return to manifestations of loss. There’s one series that’s made use of this better than most others: Battlestar Galactica.

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Celebrities remember James Garner on Twitter

On Saturday, Hollywood leading man James Garner died of natural causes in Los Angeles. He was 86.

When the news broke, celebrities immediately took to Twitter to remember the man behind Maverick, The Rockford Files, and so much more. Here are just a few of those tributes: READ FULL STORY

'Rush' might be USA's darkest -- and most interesting -- show

At first glance, USA’s new show Rush looks like it takes Royal Pains‘ “doctor-for-hire” theme, adds Tom Ellis to the mix, and throws on a bad-boy label just for fun. But after last night’s premiere, it turns out that what you think you see with Rush is not at all what you get.

In the series’ pilot, viewers meet Dr. Will Rush in a less-than-flattering scenario. In other words, he’s doing cocaine with a young woman when she has a heart attack and he’s forced to shock her back to life and then take her to the nearest “club,” which looks a lot like an emergency room. Still high himself, Rush drops the woman off with his best friend, an ER doc, and then heads back to his life of doctoring on the run. Basically, Rush makes house calls for a living. He’s one of the best doctors around, but his skill isn’t his only draw. Rather, it’s his ability to be discreet that puts him in such high demand.

Rush is the guy you want to call if you’re a famous athlete and your girlfriend needs stitches after you’ve physically abused her, for instance. Or he’s the guy you want to call if you’re a famous movie producer who just broke his penis and you don’t want the paparazzi to catch you on the way to the hospital. Rush makes up his own fees on the spot—and they’re high—and asks for cash payments upfront.

But between Rush’s own drug addiction and some of the situations his “discreet” job gets him in, Rush is a much more sinister character than the charming bad boy the show originally portrayed him as. In the pilot alone, he agrees to help his drug dealer, which results in him having to operate on a gunshot victim in a warehouse with a gun to his own head. And as for Rush’s personal life, the woman he loves refuses to get back together with him because his work and his addiction make him someone she can’t count on. Rush might be successful, but the way he lives his life causes him to struggle with right and wrong on a daily basis. By the end of the pilot, he has to make a house call to once again help out one of his best clients, a famous athlete, after said athlete nearly beats his girlfriend to death. In that moment, Rush reaches a breaking point and takes a bat to the athlete, breaking his legs, hand, and more.

So do Rush’s actions make this show darker than typical USA programming? Not necessarily. USA is no stranger to violence (Graceland) or the rebel-type (Burn Notice). However, the darker side of USA shows tends to be just that—one side. For example, Royal Pains‘ Hank once had a problem with pill addiction, but it was a storyline that didn’t stick. Or there’s USA’s Suits, where the definition of “dark” typically involves Harvey and Mike playing dirty by getting personal in the work world. What sets Rush apart from other USA shows is that it is fundamentally dark—and that darkness is not simply one element of the show but intertwined into every element of the show.

For example, going into the rest of the season, Rush is without the woman he loves, he’s still dealing with his addictions, and he’s fallen into an accidental relationship with a group of gangsters. Although he might not look it on the posters, he’s an incredibly troubled character, not just a charming guy with a dark side. Sure, he still has a lighter side and a sense of humor that makes him fun to watch. But at his core, Rush is profoundly unhappy—a fact that makes him 10 times more fascinating than the guy viewers got a glimpse of in the trailer.

All in all, Rush’s chaotic and morally ambiguous lifestyle makes USA a more interesting place to be. Although Rush can’t quite be called an antihero, this show could be seen as USA’s attempt to join into the Walter White bandwagon. Rush is certainly not that extreme, but as the golden age of TV has shown us, people enjoy a complex (if not downright evil) protagonist, and if there’s one thing Rush is not, it’s a perfect hero.

Video: Conan O'Brien and Dave Franco look for love on Tinder

In order to be successful in his line of work, Conan O’Brien has to keep up with the times. And in today’s world, that involves teaming up with Dave Franco and trying to meet people using Tinder.

Step one: They create profiles using their real pictures but fake names—Djengus Roundstone (for Franco) and Chip Whitley (for O’Brien). Then after sorting through all of their many matches, including a 74-year-old woman named Gloria who isn’t O’Brien’s biggest fan, they jump into a duct tape-filled van and head to meet one of Franco’s matches. There, they discover what the internet has to offer.

There is at least one crotch shot involved in the making of this video.


'Big Brother': And the evicted contestant is...

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UPDATE: My full recap is live! Devin and Caleb started the house as strong competitors, quickly establishing their ability to perform in competitions and forming the core of a seemingly powerful alliance.

Flash forward a couple weeks. The Bomb Squad exploded onto itself. Caleb went crazy for Amber. Devin just went crazy, crazy, crazy. Devin was the clear target this week. But Caleb’s increasingly stalker-ish behavior began to turn people against him. Caleb agreed to go on the block and agreed to throw a competition–two classic signs of eviction-episode surprise departures.

And yet: People really wanted to kick out Devin. So who went home?

Well….

SPOILERS! READ FULL STORY

Here's what Marilyn Manson looks like on 'Sons of Anarchy'

FX has announced that the final season premiere of Sons of Anarchy will air Sept. 9 and be one hour and 45 minutes long. As EW reports in our Comic-Con Preview issue (on newsstands July 18), we’ll pick up 10 days after the tragic events of the season 6 finale. Jax will be behind bars, where he meets Ron Tully (Marilyn Manson), a white supremacist shot-caller whom he uses to expand his power base.

If seeing Jax in prison orange makes you uncomfortable, odds are you’re flashing back to season 5’s “Laying Pipe.” (Yes, the guys were wearing blue scrubs when Opie (Ryan Hurst) was killed, but they started and ended the episode in orange.) Jail has never been a safe place on SOA, which may also have you wondering if Manson’s recurring character will be long for this world. If you were signing on for Sons‘ epic final season, in which essentially everyone is expected to die, wouldn’t you hope to go out in a gloriously grisly way, too?

Let’s revisit the show’s history of prison deaths: READ FULL STORY

I'm Still Not Over... Pete's death on 'Private Practice'

There are several ways a character can exit ShondaLand: They might simply pick a new path in life. They might move to Switzerland. Or more than likely, they’ll die. But when it comes to how they’ll die, the options are limitless. Rhimes has killed characters in plane crashes and hospital bombings. She’s shot people point blank between the eyes. She’s drawn out a character’s death to give them ample time to say goodbye. She’s shocked viewers by killing others in the blink of an eye (and with a bus, no less). So years ago, when word got out that Tim Daly was leaving Private Practice after the show’s fifth season, fans instantly started to gossip.

The first question: Will Pete be killed? It actually felt unlikely, considering that Pete ended season five having been arrested for murder after illegally unplugging a patient at the request of the patient’s partner. All signs more or less pointed to Pete either going to jail or going on the run indefinitely. And one of those theories wasn’t all that far off. READ FULL STORY

Video: Watch the women of 'Hotwives of Orlando' judge each other

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You can always count on a Real Housewife having something to say about someone else—which is why, when we put six costars of Hulu’s spoof The Hotwives of Orlando in the Hot Seat, we asked them to rate each other’s answers. Watch Casey Wilson, Andrea Savage, Angela Kinsey, Dannah Phirman, Tymberlee Hill, and Danielle Schneider judge each other below while they reveal their Real Housewives love guru, most prized pop culture possession, mood music, and go-to drink to throw in someone’s face. READ FULL STORY

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