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Katy Perry was on ESPN College Game Day and it was weird

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For those of you who don’t know, ESPN’s College Game Day is a morning show for college football fans to get primed for a full day of games. Since the show is filmed on campus of one of the schools playing that day, College Game Day isn’t just for commentary, but for the unique parade of hype and zeal that arises when you marry sports fandom with school spirit.

How much entertainment you get out of College Game Day is normally proportionate to how much you care about college and game days, but sometimes really strange things happen on the show. Like Katy Perry. READ FULL STORY

Fired-up Ben Affleck clashes with Bill Maher over Islam

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Ben Affleck’s publicity tour to promote Gone Girl took a detour on Friday night, when the outspoken liberal engaged in a heated debate with author Sam Harris and HBO’s Real Time host Bill Maher over their criticism of Islam. “They’ll criticize Christians … but when you want to talk about the treatment of women and homosexuals and free-thinkers and public intellectuals in the muslim world, I would argue that liberals have failed us,” said Harris. “We have been sold this meme of Islamophobia, where criticism of the religion gets conflated with bigotry towards muslims as people. It’s intellectually ridiculous.”

Affleck, who frequently expressed impatience and outrage at Harris’ more measured explanations, was offended by the message. “[Your point of view] is gross, it’s racist,” the actor said. “It’s like saying, ‘Oh, you shifty Jew!’” READ FULL STORY

Laverne Cox, Wendell Pierce talk diversity on television at 'Essence' event

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Thursday night, at the Mondrian Hotel’s Herringbone Restaurant, Essence hosted its first-ever Toast to Primetime, an event celebrating its October issue with trailblazing television stars Laverne Cox, Alfre Woodard, Nicole Beharie, and Danai Gurira on the cover.

The cover story examines all four actresses’ contributions to redefining the face of television on their respective shows: Orange Is the New Black for Cox, State of Affairs for Woodard, Sleepy Hollow for Beharie, and The Walking Dead for Gurira. Guests—including Cox and Gurira, as well as Pooch Hall, Ledisi, Terrence Jenkins, A.J. Johnson, and Essence Atkins, among others—gathered to celebrate diversity on television.

READ FULL STORY

We search for the ultimate Cool Girl, in honor of 'Gone Girl'

“Men always say that as the defining compliment, don’t they? She’s a cool girl. Being the Cool Girl means I am a hot, brilliant, funny woman who adores football, poker, dirty jokes, and burping, who plays video games, drinks cheap beer, loves threesomes and anal sex, and jams hot dogs and hamburgers into her mouth like she’s hosting the world’s biggest culinary gang bang while somehow maintaining a size 2, because Cool Girls are above all hot. Hot and understanding. Cool Girls never get angry; they only smile in a chagrined, loving manner and let their men do whatever they want. Go ahead, sh– on me, I don’t mind, I’m the Cool Girl.”
—Gillian Flynn, Gone Girl

If you’ve read Flynn’s twisty thriller—and really, if you haven’t, what exactly are you waiting for?—then you’re familiar with the passage quoted above. Though it takes up only a tiny portion of Gone Girl‘s 432 pages, Flynn’s “Cool Girl” rant has taken on a life of its own, inspiring scholarly analysis and takedowns and even an outcry from people who don’t think it’s represented well in David Fincher’s feature adaptation, which is out in theaters today.

But even those who love the Cool Girl speech know that while Flynn may have named this trope, she certainly didn’t invent it. Women who, to quote Buzzfeed’s Anne Helen Petersen, “act like a dude but look like a supermodel” have been burping across movie and TV screens for decades—especially during the bro-aissance of the past 10 or so years. But which of these beer-swilling, sports-loving, superhumanly accommodating women is the Ultimate Cool Girl? We dove deep to find out. (Spoiler: There’s more than one.) READ FULL STORY

Elmo, Cookie Monster visit EW and parody 'True Detective,' 'Sherlock,' 'Scandal'

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Sesame Street is now in the midst of its 45th season. By this point, the venerable program has had a positive influence on more children’s lives than breakfast. EW was lucky enough to have two of the Street’s kingpins—Cookie Monster and Elmo—drop by our studio and, just for fun, enact their own versions of shows like SherlockTrue DetectiveScandal, and House of Cards.

And they couldn’t have been nicer. (That is, once we made sure the dressing room had the requisite number of fresh-baked cookies specified in a certain someone’s contract rider.)

Elmo’s Frank Underwood voice is something we deeply needed to hear in order to complete our personal sense of self but just didn’t know it. Watch the video below. READ FULL STORY

'Law & Order: SVU': Every issue shoehorned into the Jay Z/Solange/Donald Sterling episode

Yep, you read that headline right: There was a lot going on in SVU last night.

Just how much? About as much as was stuffed into 2013’s biggest kitchen-sink episode, “American Tragedy”—a smorgasbord that included takes on Paula Deen, Trayvon Martin, stop-and-frisk, and even “Blurred Lines.” The latest entry in the SVU canon—which aired almost exactly one year after “American Tragedy”—was a similarly chock-full affair, complete with an analogous title (“American Disgrace”), another big-name guest star (Stacy Keach as a Donald Sterling-esque billionaire), and the same disingenuous opening title card: “The following story is fictional and does not depict any actual person or event.”

Mmmhmmm. Check out this list of issues crammed into the episode, then judge for yourself. READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: Have we reached Peak Batman?

Fox’s new show Gotham takes place in a miserable world where no one has ever heard of Batman, which makes Gotham somewhat less realistic than Game of Thrones. Two years after the final film in Christopher Nolan’s Dark Knight trifecta, Bruce Wayne’s alter ego is everywhere. In video games, there’s the upcoming Batman: Arkham Knight, the final act of an acclaimed trilogy. In comic books, DC has eight monthly series with the word Batman in the title, and that doesn’t include sundry spinoff titles like Batwoman and Batgirl and Nightwing and Batwing. Hell, even the LEGO Batman is a transmedia superstar: Stealing scenes in The LEGO Movie, headlining a hit videogame franchise. READ FULL STORY

Ben Affleck teases Jon Stewart about copying 'Argo'

On Tuesday, Ben Affleck went on The Daily Show to promote Gone Girl—and traded playful barbs with Stewart over the host’s directorial debut, the movie Rosewater. READ FULL STORY

This week's cover: 'Sons of Anarchy' takes its final ride

Sons of Anarchy fans still reeling from the Sept. 30 episode (read our recap) may want to take a beta blocker before reading this week’s cover story, which goes on the set and behind the scenes as the cast and the creator, Kurt Sutter, prepare for an epic ending.

The seventh and final season of FX’s highest-rated show finds Jax Teller (Charlie Hunnam) leading his motorcycle club, SAMCRO, on a mission to avenge the death of his wife Tara (Maggie Siff). What Jax doesn’t know is that his scheming mother, Gemma (Katey Sagal), is the real killer. In a preseason poll on EW.com, 81 percent of readers assumed that Gemma has to die for her crimes—and that was before her cover-up of Tara’s murder by carving fork ignited a street war with a devastating body count. “I kind of agree with them,” Sagal admits. “That seems like a correct assumption. I mean, it’s pretty heinous where she is now. Even though she didn’t mean it.”

Fans also assume Jax will eventually learn the truth. But what will he do? “Anyone else in the world, 100 percent guaranteed he’s gonna murder them in slow and brutal fashion, but it’s his mother, you know. It’s gonna be complicated,” says Hunnam. “I don’t envy Kurt in trying to figure out the right way to approach that.” Sutter already knows how the story will unfold—not that he’s willing to spoil it. “The question is, does Jax ever get the whole truth? Is he supposed to get the whole truth? If he only gets part of the truth, what does that mean? We’ll play with all that stuff,” he says cagily. “I think once he gets information, as much of it as he gets, we’ll see it play out in a different emotional way.” READ FULL STORY

'Sons of Anarchy' star Theo Rossi names another show that made him cry

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Theo Rossi will admit he was competitive playing Scene It? with his friends when they first moved from New York to LA, so it’s no surprise that he’s an entertainment junkie. To prove it, the man who plays Juice on FX’s Sons of Anarchy sat down to take one of our Pop Culture Personality Tests.

Watch the video and read the transcript the below—then feel guilty for thinking Juice must die this season. READ FULL STORY

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