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Category: TV (11-20 of 10787)

John Oliver rants about the sugar industry on 'Last Week Tonight'

Halloween is fast approaching, and John Oliver has a few words to say about the consumption of sugar that’s about to take place.

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Chelsea Peretti says no to fedoras in trailer for Netflix comedy special

Right now, Chelsea Peretti is most known as the always-weird Gina on Fox’s Brooklyn Nine-Nine—but she’s also a skilled stand-up comedian who has a special coming to Netflix in November.

In her hour-long set, Peretti covers a variety of topics ranging from intimidating dogs to fashion crimes: “Do you guys think it’s worse to wear a fedora or kill 15 people?” she asks the audience in the special’s trailer. She also demonstrates the polite way for a woman to eat a banana in public, which turns out to be not very polite at all. READ FULL STORY

13 'Pride and Prejudice'-inspired movies, books, TV shows and more, ranked

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It’s a truth universally acknowledged that a person in want of a good project will adapt Pride and Prejudice–if not always to dazzling effect. The latest take, a two-part miniseries called Death Comes to Pemberley, premiered yesterday on PBS. And if there’s anything P&P fans like almost as much as Austen’s book, it’s consuming and then critiquing the various interpretations of it. Which is why we’re taking this opportunity to rank 13 different iterations of Pride & Prejudice, from the best (the 1995 miniseries starring Colin Firth is a nigh-untouchable high point) to the significantly less great.

1. Pride and Prejudice (miniseries): The 6-hour 1995 BBC version is the gold standard for faithful adaptation. Colin Firth’s haughty, smoldering Darcy is the platonic ideal of the character, playing beautifully off of Jennifer Ehle’s wry, mature Lizzy Bennet. Plus, the miniseries’ runtime means every nuance of Austen’s work (and her quippy dialogue) is represented—while allowing for some creative liberties, like Firth’s Darcy taking a bath, or a dip in a pond that leads to him striding about manfully in a wet white shirt. READ FULL STORY

Watch 'Reading Rainbow' star LeVar Burton read 'Go the F-- to Sleep'

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Reading Rainbow’s LeVar Burton lent his famous voice to a special reading of Go the F— to Sleep.

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World Series Game 5 first pitch honors Giants fan Robin Williams (Updated)

UPDATE: MLB.com has posted video of the tribute as well as the pitch, both of which are embedded below.

ORIGINAL STORY: Family and friends were on hand for a tribute to Robin Williams during the fifth game of the World Series on Oct. 26 to honor the late Giants fan.

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Jim Carrey hosts 'Saturday Night Live' this weekend -- talk about it here!

SUNDAY UPDATE: Click over for a full recap of SNL with Jim Carrey and Iggy Azalea

ORIGINAL POST: All righty then.

Sorry—I know that reference is as painfully dated as this Austin Powers costume. But it’s tough not to think about Jim Carrey’s best-known roles as we consider the actor’s third SNL outing—and, to be honest, to consider how long it’s been since he last made a great comedy. READ FULL STORY

Zoe Saldana on her hero, 'strong female characters,' and playing real women (and aliens)

Zoe Saldana knows how to play ass-kicking, universe-saving, unusually colorful heroes like Gamora in Guardians of the Galaxy, Neytiri in Avatar, and Uhura in Star Trek. But for her new AOL web series, Saldana turned the camera on everyday people who play the role of the hero.

In My Hero, which debuted yesterday, Saldana and some of her fellow celebrities—including Julianne Hough, Nick Cannon and Maria Menounos—pay tribute to the people they cherish via short, touching vignettes. “People are generally very grateful to the people around them that keep them together, that supported them, that encouraged them to become what they are as artists,” the actress says. “So we thought, what a great opportunity to do a show about this and send a very positive message out there. Because I find it hard to believe that anybody makes it on their own. There’s always somebody that helped you in some way.”

In the interview below, Saldana tells EW about how her hero (spoiler: it’s her mom) inspired her to make a habit of playing rather… ethereal characters. The actress also talks about balancing the upcoming sequels to her three big franchises with motherhood (she’s pregnant with twins!), why movies need more real women—not strong ones—and why we should stop saying the word “ethnic.” READ FULL STORY

'Constantine' star Matt Ryan is a super binge watcher

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The premiere of Constantine (Oct. 24 at 10 p.m. ET on NBC) will introduce many viewers to Welsh-born actor Matt Ryan, who stars as the titular demon hunter and master of the occult made famous in DC Comics’ Hellblazer series. But when Ryan stopped by EW, we got a head start. We learned he uses classical music to get into character (Schoenberg is great for getting into those dark places, he says). He had been reading the Hellblazer comic books before he went to bed, but he found himself having strange dreams, so now he unwinds by putting on nature programs instead . He is competitive when he’s playing the FIFA video game but less so when it comes to Call of Duty. “The thing is with Call of Duty, I don’t have enough time to become so good at it, so if I go and play online, I’m just getting my ass kicked by 12-year-old kids,” he says. And despite the fact that he films Constantine in Atlanta, the same city where his best mate Joseph Morgan shoots The Originals, they rarely get to see one another. (The two met in college and bonded over a shared love of genre films. They’ve costarred in 2013’s Armistice, which falls into that category, and  in 500 Miles North, which should be released next year and centers on two estranged brothers on a road trip to scatter their father’s ashes and recreate childhood memories to secure their inheritance.)

As for Ryan’s fascination with the dark side, he traces it back to childhood camping trips and the requisite scary stories that accompanied them. None of them quite prepared him for Constantine. “I feel sometimes that the writers sit in the office in LA going, ‘What can we do to Matt Ryan?’ I’ve been naked covered in blood, flung around the place doing exorcisms,” he says. At least that means our Pop Culture Personality Test was a piece of cake. Watch the video and read the transcript below.  READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly: How 'The Walking Dead' is 'Lord of the Rings'

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Robert Kirkman likes to describe The Walking Dead as a zombie movie that never ends. But to my eyes, the most interesting thing about the show is how it’s spent five seasons fluttering between different storytelling modes. The show lacks a single setting and makes a point of killing off at least a couple key cast members every season. This can make The Walking Dead feel unwieldy or unfocused, but it also means that there’s an exciting state of constant flux underpinning the show’s basic head-crushing thrills. I’ve always said that original showrunner Frank Darabont most clearly viewed his version of The Walking Dead as a kind of neo-western, with Sheriff Rick as a clean-cut cowboy wanderer set morally adrift in a new frontier apocalypse. READ FULL STORY

Watch Benedict Cumberbatch try to walk like Beyonce

This is the stuff memes are made of: Benedict Cumberbatch attempting to do Beyoncé’s walk.  READ FULL STORY

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