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Martha Stewart slams Gwyneth Paltrow: 'She just needs to be quiet'

Martha Stewart probably doesn’t have Goop bookmarked on her browser.

In a recent interview with Net-a-Porter’s Porter magazine, Stewart bashed Goop founder Gwyneth Paltrow, claiming the actress “wouldn’t be trying to be Martha Stewart” if she were confident in her acting skills. “She just needs to be quiet,” Stewart said, according to Page Six.

Paltrow wasn’t the only woman Stewart targeted on her apparent insult spree: She also ragged on the Netflix series Orange is the New Black, claiming the lead character of Piper was badly cast. “They could have done so much better,” Stewart said, referring to Taylor Schilling—who scored an Emmy nod for her performance as Piper. “That girl is not good enough, the lead actress.” (It’s worth noting here that in the mid-’00s, Stewart was nearly incarcerated in Danbury, Connecticut’s Federal Correctional Institution, the same prison on which OITNB‘s fictional Litchfield prison is based.) READ FULL STORY

Six memorable, unusual uses of 'The Star-Spangled Banner'

This coming week brings the 200th birthday of The Star-Spangled Banner. It is, in addition to being notoriously hard to sing, the National Anthem of the United States of America. While the song is used for many different occasions—baseball games and elections and fireworks and War of 1812-themed frat parties—most of the time what happens during its performances is pretty consistent. Those who are sitting stand, those who wear hats remove them, and everyone sort of uncomfortably half sings along while looking for the nearest American flag. It’s that universal ritual that makes unusual uses of The Star-Spangled Banner all the more memorable. Like these, for instance:

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Which 'SNL' star will go dramatic next? We've got pitches

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This weekend gives you two chances to see Bill Hader stretch his acting muscles. In dark comedy The Skeleton Twins, Hader and his former Saturday Night Live co-star Kristen Wiig play siblings who reunite after suicide attempts. Meanwhile, in The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Them, Hader has a supporting role as the best friend of James McAvoy’s Conor, who is going through a pretty rough time in his relationship with Jessica Chastain’s titular character.

Saturday Night Live actors taking on dramatic—or, rather, serious—roles is nothing new. Wiig has steadily been putting films with weighty themes onto her resume, like 2013’s Hateship Loveship, based on an Alice Munro short story. Will Forte surprised audiences with a nuanced turn in Alexander Payne’s Nebraska last year, which also saw Taran Killam playing a small part in 12 Years a Slave. Though he’s inflicted Grown Ups on the public, Adam Sandler has also shown he can do more than his schtick in films like 2002’s Punch Drunk Love; he’s jumping back into the dramatic game with this year’s Men, Women & Children. Then, of course, there’s Bill Murray’s entire career to consider, especially the films he’s made since 2003’s Lost in Translation.

So, which SNL mainstay will take on a meaty, dramatic lead next? The jury’s out for now—but I’ve imagined a few roles for current and recent cast members who have yet to fully embrace their dramatic sides.

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Jon Heder is Napoleon Dynamite again in video for fan with cancer

It’s been 10 years since Napoleon Dynamite was released, but Jon Heder brought back the titular character for a very special occasion.

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Ernie Hudson talks 'Ghostbusters' anniversary, and why Bill Murray rules

Ghostbusters celebrated its 30th anniversary this June, and to celebrate, star Ernie Hudson stopped by EW Radio to talk about his favorite memories on set, and what it was like working with Bill Murray.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: Tell us, if you had to pick out one memory or moment on set that really strikes you about your time working with those guys, what would it be?
ERNIE HUDSON: For me, it was being in New York, shooting in New York. And it’s hanging on the streets with Bill Murray the few times we got a chance to just hang out, and even shooting, [seeing] how much the fans love Bill Murray. They were [in love with him], and what amazed me in watching—’cause I’d observe—is how he would wade into the crowd, and he just gave this love back. A lot of actors, they hide, they don’t want all that attention, but Bill would just become one with them. And it was a beautiful thing to watch. I saw him recently, and he still has that thing of just including people in a very special way. That was, for me, the thing I take away from it the most. Just seeing him with the people and seeing how he dealt with his fanbase.

You have a secret phone number?
I have a [secret phone number].  He never answers anyway.

Jeff Goldblum leads a 'Jurassic Park' theme singalong on 'Seth Meyers'

Jurassic Park sex symbol Jeff Goldblum—come on, you know what shot I’m talking about—knows some lyrics to John Williams’ classic score for the dinosaur movie, and he trotted them out on last night’s Late Night with Seth Meyers. READ FULL STORY

Is Shia LaBeouf spelling something with his jogging routes?

Shia LaBeouf still isn’t famous, but he’s still doing weird things on the internet. Case in point: He’s spelling out something with his running routes using Nike+.

After a months-long hiatus (interrupted by a post of the actor pouring ice over himself for the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge), LaBeouf started tweeting fitness updates Monday. The first was nothing special—just an automated tweet from the Nike+ app reading, “I just ran 1.83 mi with Nike+.” The second was even less exciting, as he didn’t even break the one-mile mark: “I just ran 0.85 mi with Nike+.”  READ FULL STORY

What pop culture teaches us about life as a royal 'spare to the heir'

This morning, the news broke that Prince William and Kate Middleton are expecting their second child—or as some put it, their “spare to the heir.”

In the real-life tabloids, second-eldest royal siblings are often portrayed as the more “out of control” children, with less royal responsibility. But TV and movies are just as fascinated (if not more so) with noble siblings, and according to pop culture, being second in the royal bloodline could mean any number of other things, too. Here are a few more specific lessons that Prince George’s future sibling might want to take into account.

The King’s Speech: If your brother abdicates, you could become the king—and be forced to speak publicly on a regular basis—even if you don’t want to.

The Royals: From the looks of this show, it doesn’t really matter which kid you are. Being royal means partying and trying to keep your private parts off the cover of tabloid magazines.

The Lion King: Your jealous brother will probably drop you off a cliff and allow you to get trampled by a stampede. But don’t worry, your son will avenge your honor (in a few years).

Frozen: You can either become a villain, if you’re a man, or you can be so desperate to be married that you fall for a villain, if you’re a woman.

Hamlet: As a “spare to the heir,” you might one day get the urge to murder your older brother and marry his wife. [Ed note: Don't do that.]

Reign: If your older brother is a bastard, you might as well be the first-born. Well, unless your fiancee decides to marry him and get him legitimized by the Pope. Also, if your bastard brother isn’t a threat, your dad might be. Just keep an eye on him and make sure he doesn’t try to kill you and marry your wife. Finally, you might have to murder your father in a jousting match in order to keep him away from your woman. Hey, all’s fair in love and royalty.

Beauty and the Beast: If you piss off an enchantress, it won’t matter which sibling you are.

Ever After: So long as your mom is Anjelica Huston, it also doesn’t matter which sibling you are. (But if you aren’t the first-born, you won’t win the heart of the handsome prince, obviously.)

The White Queen: Again, birth order doesn’t mean anything. The throne goes to the best manipulator.

Marie Antoinette: If you’re a female “spare,” you can still reign if you pick the right husband.

Game of Thrones: If the King dies, there will be war. Also, if your older brother dies, the kingdom is yours, even if you’re a child. Final lesson: If you’ve been exiled, you’re going to need an army to have any shot at the crown.

Mulan: … On the upside, at least you know that if your family needs to go to war, they’ll look to your older brother before they look to you.

Seth Green wouldn't recommend seeing 'Purple Rain' with your mom

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Seth Green wants you to know that his new movie, The Identical, isn’t about Elvis Presley. It just uses the fact that Elvis had a stillborn twin brother as inspiration for a nature vs. nurture story revolving around musically gifted twins (both played by Blake Rayne) who are unknowingly separated at birth. “It’s a story about what you’re told your life is meant to be versus what you feel in your heart you want to be,” Green says. “It’s about the identity that you choose, not the one that’s projected on you from the teachings of your parents or their learned trauma from their parents, which I think is such an important message.”

When we invited Green, who plays a best friend/drummer, to take our EW Pop Culture Personality Test, we learned of his childhood trauma—seeing Purple Rain with his mother and being frightened by the Don Knotts comedy Hot Lead and Cold Feet. Watch the video and read the transcript below. READ FULL STORY

A chat with Ron Shelton after his 'Bull Durham' musical debuted in Atlanta

In Bull Durham, Ron Shelton’s classic 1988 baseball movie, Kevin Costner’s sage journeyman catcher, Crash Davis, is sent to the low-level minors to mentor a flame-throwing knucklehead named Nuke LaLoosh (Tim Robbins), who couldn’t hit water with his fastball if he fell out of a boat. One of them is on the fast-track to the big leagues, and the other is just trying to hang on for one more season of baseball—both of them are madly in love with a local Bulls’ groupie named Annie (Susan Sarandon).

On Sept. 3, Bull Durham the musical began a month of previews at the Alliance Theatre in Atlanta. Atlanta isn’t exactly the Carolina League—Aida and The Color Purple had their starts at the Alliance. But if Broadway is The Show, then the show’s producers—including the film’s writer/director Ron Shelton—are hoping their production is more like Nuke. “We’re here until Oct. 5, but beyond that, we can’t say anything concrete,” says Shelton, who also penned the musical’s book, “but Broadway is obviously everyone’s goal and intention.”

Shelton, a former minor-league player himself who’s directed some of the finest sports movies of the last 25 years (White Men Can’t Jump, Tin Cup), fielded musical-theater offers for years before finally agreeing to bring his most famous work to the stage. Producers Jack Viertel and Laura Stanczyk approached Shelton about four years ago, and this time, he said yes. Since then, Shelton and lyricist Susan Werner have set out to make a musical that somehow incorporates both locker-room humor and Bermuda-Triangle references to a woman’s anatomy. A pair of Tony-nominees, Will Swenson (Hair) and Melissa Errico (Amour), play Crash and Annie, and John Behlmann cuts loose as Nuke, a regular nuclear meltdown.

Shelton spoke to EW the day after the show’s premiere. READ FULL STORY

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