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Category: Movies (41-50 of 7476)

Monty Python reunion: Eric Idle on his late friend Robin Williams

While Monty Python member Eric Idle was directing last summer’s reunion shows, he made sure to include a small role in the Michael Palin-fronted “Blackmail” sketch that could be played by a different famous Python fan each night. That roll call of guest talent would ultimately include both Simon Pegg and Mike Myers, who was also the guest performer during the Pythons’ last performance at London’s massive O2 arena. That the Austin Powers star would agree to appear in such a tiny part speaks to the huge and enduring influence of Monty Python’s Flying Circus and the subsequent films created by Idle, Palin, John Cleese, Terry Jones, Terry Gilliam, and the late Graham Chapman.

But Myers’ presence in what is likely to be the troupe’s last-ever live performance came with a note of sadness for Idle, one that would become outright tragic over time. Why? Because Idle had originally planned that final night’s guest to be Robin Williams.

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Counting down the 10 darkest holiday movies, in honor of 'The Santa Clause'

The Santa Clause is 20 years old today—and while the series spawned a trilogy of family-friendly holiday films, we can’t forget the franchise’s dark origins. Tim Allen’s Scott Calvin becomes Santa Claus by accidentally causing the original St. Nick to fall to his doom. Sure, the film pushes a “seeing is believing” message and includes plenty of warm and fuzzy holiday cheer—but it still starts off with the death of Santa Claus.

The Santa Clause isn’t the only movie to put a dark spin on the holiday season; there’s a long and storied cinematic history of strange, bleak, and darkly hilarious Christmas stories. Here are 10 of the most notable:

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Jennifer Lawrence vows that she will never join Twitter

Sorry, Tumblr hordes: Don’t expect to see Katniss Everdeen playing in your sandbox anytime soon.

In an interview with her Hunger Games co-stars on BBC Radio 1′s Breakfast Show with Nick Grimshaw, Jennifer Lawrence vowed that she would never join Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram. “I’m not very good on phone or technology. I cannot really keep up with emails. So the idea of Twitter is so unthinkable to me,” she told Grimshaw. “I’ll never get Twitter. If you ever see a Facebook or Instagram or Twitter that says it’s me, it’s not me.” READ FULL STORY

Stevie Wonder, Meryl Streep, Stephen Sondheim among Medal of Freedom winners

President Obama will be awarding 19 individuals with the highest civilian honor in America, ranging from singers to civil rights activists to Oscar-winning actresses.

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This 'Walking Dead' star is finally ready for her own 'Harry Potter' wand

Alanna-Masterson

As Tara on The Walking Dead, Alanna Masterson is the kind of person to whom people want to reveal things (well, at least Eugene). But we got Masterson to do the talking when she stopped by EW to take our Pop Culture Personality Test. Watch the video and read the transcript below to find out about her intense binge-watching habits, the movie her older brothers (including actors Danny, Christopher, and Jordan Masterson) encouraged her to watch too young, and when she plans to upgrade from a Hermione wand.  READ FULL STORY

Entertainment Geekly Mailbag: 'Interstellar' rage

interstellar

Christopher Nolan made Memento, but he also made The Dark Knight Rises. Great filmmakers can make bad movies: This is not a particularly complicated equation. And Nolan’s new space melodrama Interstellar is not a particularly complicated movie. The science is elaborate and insane, but the emotional stakes are simple: Father loves daughter, father saves humanity.

But Nolan is one of our plottiest filmmakers. (Most films have three acts; Nolan’s movies usually have at least six, usually out of order and/or overlapping.) I attempted to explain the plot of Interstellar, but even I ran up against some impenetrable cosmo-logic. Some readers in the comments offered helpful suggestions. Some readers were angry that people didn’t like Interstellar, a transcendent visually stimulating three-hour odyssey. Some readers were angry that people liked Interstellar, a gooey three-hour snoozefest. Some heavy thoughts on Interstellar, is what I’m getting at.

Let’s dig into the reactions, shall we? (Warning: A million spoilers for Interstellar follow.) READ FULL STORY

Go behind the scenes of EW's reunions with Ghostbusters, Sports Night, more

Are the Ghostbusters still taking calls 30 years later? Are the Baker Boys still fabulous? And are Dan Rydell and Casey McCall still behind the desk at Sports Night? They were for Entertainment Weekly‘s Reunions Issue.

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Germany will relive its World Cup win with 'Die Mannschaft' movie

World Cup fever swept the summer with its superfluous amount of “Hottest World Cup players” listicles and the introduction of “The Team”—the German soccer team that came out on top.

Now, to relive the glory, the German Football Federation (DFB) filmed Die Mannschaft (The Team), a 90-minute movie that goes behind the scenes of the blood, sweat, and tears-soaked Germany’s World Cup win. Produced by German filmmakers Martin Christ, Jens Gronheid, and Uli Voigt, the film will include rare footage, behind-the-scenes clips, and interviews with the 23-man team.

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'Big Hero 6' strays far from its source material -- and that's great

Big Hero 6 is the first Disney film based on a Marvel comic, but the marketing campaign isn’t making a big deal out of it. That’s by design—the studio intentionally sought out an obscure property so they could make it their own, free of any sort of expectation from audiences. This strategy shows in the final product: While the film’s characters do have comic book counterparts, they are very, very different from their predecessors. And the film is so much better for it.

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12 Oscar-bait roles that failed to get a nibble from the Academy

In The Theory of Everything, Eddie Redmayne plays Stephen Hawking, the brilliant British cosmologist stricken with Lou Gehrig’s disease, the motor-neurone disease that robbed him of his ability to speak on his own. The film follows Hawking from his academic days at Cambridge, where he met his first wife, Jane (Felicity Jones), through his history-making research that became increasing arduous as he became a prisoner of his own body.

Since the film premiered at the Toronto Film Festival in September, Redmayne—best known for the role of the dashing Marius in Les Miserables—has rightfully been one of the frontrunners for this year’s Best Actor. Not only does he fully commit to the demands of playing a man who loses control of his body, but he somehow captures Hawking’s mischievous spark and unspoken joy of life with only the use of a few facial muscles. It’s a mesmerizing performance. It might also be the most tantalizing piece of Oscar bait since Daniel Day-Lewis in My Left FootREAD FULL STORY

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