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Category: Movies (11-20 of 7627)

Entertainment Geekly: American Snipers

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The best movie ever made about an American sniper is a British film directed by a Spanish guy. 28 Weeks Later came out eight years ago and hasn’t aged a day. It’s technically a sequel to 28 Days Later, the movie that transformed the zombie apocalypse genre into the pre-eminent post-9/11 pop culture myth. READ FULL STORY

Join EW's Facebook Q&A with Patrick Stewart

The mutant leader himself will be coming to EW‘s Facebook page on Friday morning. Starting at 11:30 a.m. ET, Patrick Stewart will be fielding questions posted on our Facebook page ahead of the release of his new movie Match. Now’s your chance to ask him why he isn’t coming back for the next X-Men movie, or find out what it’s like hanging out with Ian McKellen.

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Alan Menken tells the stories behind songs from 'Little Mermaid,' 'Aladdin,' and more Disney classics

If you’ve ever loved a Disney song, chances are 65-year-old Alan Menken wrote it. With Oscars, Grammys, and Tonys to his name, he’s now set his sights on TV with ABC’s medieval musical comedy Galavant (which concludes Sunday at 8 p.m. on ABC). EW asked the legend to recount the stories behind some of his most iconic songs. (Note: Little Shop of Horrors is the only project on this list unrelated to Disney.) READ FULL STORY

Anne Hathaway and Jon Stewart get the giggles on 'The Daily Show'

We all get the giggles sometimes—even Anne Hathaway, who couldn’t stop laughing on The Daily Show Wednesday night after going over the very, very depressing summary of her upcoming film, Song One.

“They haven’t spoken for six months,” she said on the show, describing the relationship between her and her brother in the film, “and then he gets hit by a car and is in a coma.” She and Jon Stewart then looked at each other and burst out laughing in a fit that went on for about a minute. Watch Stewart try to turn their attention back to the serious movie. (Spoiler alert: He fails.) READ FULL STORY

Nominated For Nothing: 'The Immigrant'

Just about every year, brilliant movies are utterly ignored by the Oscars. The Searchers, Groundhog Day, Breathless, King Kong, Casino Royale, Touch of Evil, Caddyshack, Mean Streets, The Big Lebowski, Blackfish — the Academy has a long history of overlooking comedies, action movies, horror flicks, hard-boiled genre pics, artsy foreign films, and documentaries that aren’t about World War II. Before the ceremony, we’ll be taking a closer look at films that were too small, too weird, or perhaps simply too awesome for the Academy Awards. These are the Non-Nominees.

The film: James Gray (Two Lovers, We Own The Night) deep-dives into 1920s New York with the story of a Polish woman named Ewa Cybulska (Marion Cotillard), who comes to America with her ailing sister, Magda (Angela Sarafyan). Due to Magda’s illness, the two are separated at Ellis Island, leaving Ewa on her own. She’s taken in by the seemingly charming Bruno (Joaquin Phoenix)—only to be forced into a life of prostitution. Desperate to get away, Ewa falls in with Bruno’s magician cousin, Orlando (Jeremy Renner), believing he can save her.

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Nominated for Nothing: 'The Babadook'

Just about every year, brilliant movies are utterly ignored by the Oscars. The Searchers, Groundhog Day, Breathless, King Kong, Casino Royale, Touch of Evil, Caddyshack, Mean Streets, The Big Lebowski, Blackfish — the Academy has a long history of overlooking comedies, action movies, horror flicks, hard-boiled genre pics, artsy foreign films, and documentaries that aren’t about World War II. Before the ceremony, we’ll be taking a closer look at films that were too small, too weird, or perhaps simply too awesome for the Academy Awards. These are the Non-Nominees.

The film: The Babadook, a scary movie about an exhausted single mom, her exhausting son, and the scariest pop-up book ever. The debut of Australian writer-director Jennifer Kent, The Babadook was already a minor legend among horror fans before its late November release, after the film spent 2014 tearing up the festival circuit and winning a smattering of hipper-than-Oscar awards (including a “Best First Film” award from the New York Film Critics Circle). READ FULL STORY

Read the 'Time' interview with the real 'American Sniper'

Back in 2011, before Bradley Cooper even strapped on a rifle, the book that inspired the Oscar-nominated film American Sniper was just coming out. The autobiography of the same name tells the combat story of Chris Kyle, the real-life sniper. READ FULL STORY

E.T. showed up in a Scottish tree trunk

And you thought E.T. was back in space.

Billy Harley, who owns Scotland’s Uig Hotel, was chopping wood when he discovered that wasn’t entirely the case.

“I phoned home and my wife brought a camera out to take some pictures,” Harley said in a statement. “We’re not quite sure what to do now. We could turn E.T. into a coffee table or a bar stool maybe.” Or they could place a candy dish full of Reese’s Pieces on the chunk of wood and call it a day. READ FULL STORY

Take note, Hollywood: 5 great portrayals of ethical female journalists

In television and film, female journalists have something of a bad rap. As New York magazine’s Marin Cogan pointed out recently, on shows like House of Cards and in movies like Thank You for Smoking, lady reporters spend more time getting romantically entangled with their sources than, you know, reporting.

Of course, as Cogan notes, characters don’t have to be picture-perfect people to be positive portrayals of female journalists. But they certainly don’t have to be sleeping their way to a good story, either. “We don’t need movies lionizing us as saints,” she wrote. “But would it kill Hollywood to give us one grown-up Rory Gilmore?”

Fortunately, some positive representations of female reporters do exist in pop culture. So, Hollywood, take note: Here are some fictional journalists—who are both female and good at their jobs—from whom storytellers could take some cues.
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Kevin Hart hosts 'Saturday Night Live' this weekend: Talk about it here!

The end of 2014 and beginning of 2015 have been kinda rough for Kevin Hart. In December, a leaked email thread revealed that he’d allegedly asked to be paid additional money beyond his $3 million salary to tweet about an upcoming movie; “I’m not saying he’s a whore,” a studio exec reportedly wrote, “but he’s a whore.” (“Knowing your self worth is extremely important,” Hart wrote on Instagram after the email was published. “I OWN MY BRAND….I MAKE SMART DECISIONS FOR MY BRAND.”) The jokes he made while presenting at last week’s Golden Globes—one about how animated filmmakers have imaginations “fueled by weed,” one about how he wasn’t going to promote his new movie from the stage…before he promoted his new movie from the stage—both bombed, loudly.

And the aforementioned movie, which Hart will undoubtedly promote early and often on Saturday Night Live as well, is earning dismal reviews and less than impressive box office—especially compared to the comedian’s last January release. (Ride Along made $14.4 million on Jan. 17 alone last year; it earned $41.5 million its first weekend in total, making it the strongest January opening ever until the blockbuster success of this weekend’s American Sniper. The Wedding Ringer doesn’t look on pace to earn anywhere near that much.)

So: Could tonight’s SNL give Hart a chance to turn it all around—or even, as Don Draper would say, to change the conversation?

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