PopWatch Entertainment Weekly's PopWatch Blog

Category: Books (21-30 of 445)

The 'Game of Thrones' TV Book Club: On big changes afoot up North and in the Vale

Welcome back to the Game of Thrones TV Book Club, a discussion space for Thrones  viewers who have also read the five books (so far) of George R. R. Martin’s Song of Ice and Fire series. This week, Hillary Busis and Thrones recapper extraordinaire James Hibberd — filling in for Darren Franich — talk changes at Craster’s Keep, tension between Arya and the Hound, and the Case of the Disappearing Dragons. (You know there’ll be spoilers for all the books and the show, right?) READ FULL STORY

J.K. Rowling remembers Battle of Hogwarts: 'I hated killing some of those people'

battle-of-hogwarts-01.jpg

J.K. Rowling may not tweet often, but when she does, it’s magical.

The Harry Potter author took to Twitter Friday to send out the following update: “It’s the 16th anniversary of the Battle of Hogwarts. I’m having a moment’s silence over my keyboard. I hated killing some of those people.”

You guys! Despite cavalierly killing Lupin, Tonks, Fred Weasley, Colin Creevey, Lavender Brown, Severus Snape and dozens more, she does have feelings! READ FULL STORY

'Breaking Bad' reunion: Skinny Pete, a Salamanca, and the guy who got his head crushed by an ATM promote new book

Everybody dies … it’s a fact of life, and of fictional television. And nobody knows that better than David Ury, who once appeared on an episode of Breaking Bad only to get his head squashed by an ATM. So perhaps, it’s important to point out that everybody dies, but not necessarily in the same way.

Now, Ury has written a parody of children’s books titled Everybody Dies: A Children’s Book for Grown-Ups! And to promote the book’s upcoming release, Ury asked a few other Breaking Bad alums to join him for a quick video. Unfortunately, Charles Baker (Skinny Pete) doesn’t talk about Star Trek even a little bit, but you do get to hear Luis Moncada (Marco Salamanca) speak English, which might shatter your entire world to pieces.

Watch the reunion below:

READ FULL STORY

Gillian Flynn's Reddit AMA: Author calls reports of 'Gone Girl' movie changes 'greatly exaggerated'

At ease, Gone Girl purists: According to author Gillian Flynn, there’s no need to fear David Fincher’s upcoming adaptation.

In EW’s Gone Girl cover story — published this past January — Fincher made waves by implying that Flynn’s bestselling story of a (very) twisted marriage had been dramatically altered during its journey from page to screen. What’s more, Flynn herself was the one doing the butchery. “Ben [Affleck] was so shocked by it,” Fincher said, describing how his star responded to Flynn’s Gone Girl screenplay. “He would say, ‘This is a whole new third act! She literally threw that third act out and started from scratch.'”

Perhaps, however, we shouldn’t have taken those words so literally. During a Reddit AMA posted Tuesday afternoon, a participant mentioned that his girlfriend was a big fan of Flynn’s novel — then added that she “was disappointed to hear that you were changing the movie up a little when compared to the book.” Here’s Flynn’s response in full:

READ FULL STORY

The 'Game of Thrones' TV Book Club: Let's talk about that Jaime/Cersei scene

Welcome back to the Game of Thrones TV Book Club, a discussion space for Thrones viewers who have also read the five books (so far) of George R. R. Martin’s Song of Ice and Fire series. This week, Darren Franich and Hillary Busis talk disturbing sex scenes, the value of adaptive changes, and just why Davos deserves better than his TV treatment. (You know there’ll be spoilers for the books and the show, right?) For more Thrones fun, check out James Hibberd’s full recap of “Breaker of Chains” and his interview with newly returned Thrones star Aidan Gillen.

READ FULL STORY

The 'Game of Thrones' TV Book Club: 'Song of Ice and Fire' readers talk Purple Wedding and more

Thought we were done with Game of Thrones articles for a few days, given yesterday’s barrage? Think again! Today EW introduces the Game of Thrones TV Book Club — a discussion space for Thrones viewers who have also read the five books (so far) of George R. R. Martin’s Song of Ice and Fire series.

This week, Darren Franich and Hillary Busis talk 77-course meals, the truth about Jon Snow’s parentage — and what Game of Thrones might do better than ASOIAF. (You know there’ll be spoilers for the books and the show, right?)

DARREN: It’s been about eight years since I first read Storm of Swords, and in rereading the chapters about the Purple Wedding, it struck me that there was one incredibly important aspect that the TV show left out: The 77 courses! Mushroom and snail soup, peacocks stuffed with dates, fish tarts fresh from the ovens: Eat your heart out, Top Chef! Was there anything that you missed from the Literary Purple Wedding, Hillary? Or, conversely, was there any new addition that particularly jumped out at you?

READ FULL STORY

'Allegiant' will be two films? Why this decision might hurt Veronica Roth's work

There will be four movies for Four.

It was announced Friday morning that the final book in the Divergent trilogy, Allegiant, will be split into two films, coming out a year apart, bringing the franchise to four films total. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows kicked off this trend — successfully — which means that now everyone feels free to turn their film installments into two projects (Twilight did it, and Hunger Games will do it as well). My colleague Darren Franich already wrote about why this is a trend that needs to die — and I wholeheartedly agree. But for Divergent/Allegiant specifically, I’m quite curious exactly how the studio plans to make two films — and how they plan to make sure that decision won’t ultimately hurt Veronica Roth’s work.

[Spoilers for Allegiant follow] READ FULL STORY

PopWatch Planner: 'Game of Thrones' returns, along with MTV's 'The Challenge' and more

I can win over most of you with five words about this week: Game of Thrones is back. But if that’s not enough for you, we’ve also got a new Bill Murray film in theaters, a funny new read, and the start of the 25th season of MTV’s The Challenge. Let’s just say you’ve got a diverse and very interesting week of pop culture ahead of you. Here’s what your schedule looks like this week:

READ FULL STORY

'Paper Towns' and Everyday YA: Please adapt these teen tales into films too!

anna-and-the-french-kiss.jpg

John Green fans must have felt as though they’d stumbled into the literal heart of Jesus on Monday with news that the author’s 2008 novel Paper Towns would also be adapted into a feature film, with The Fault in Our Stars actor Nat Wolff cast in the lead. The announcement isn’t just a boon for Nerdfighters everywhere, but also for fans of what, for our purposes, I’ll call Everyday YA: teen narratives in which nary a magic wand, sparkling vampire, or deadly arena (save for the high school hallway, of course) are to be found. And this latest option may just be the start.

When my colleague Nicole Sperling spoke with movie producers in the wake of Divergent‘s boffo box office, they hinted that the trend in young-adult filmmaking may very well be these types of tales — “less action-oriented and more intimate,” as Sperling summarized it. So if the tide is indeed turning toward the sort of characters who would have populated your 15th birthday party, noshing on Doritos and paging through YM magazines (RIP!), where should moviemakers mine for source material? I’ve got three suggestions for Everyday YA perfectly suited for celluloid: READ FULL STORY

A deep dive into 'The Giver' trailer ('sup, Taylor Swift?)

the-giver-taylor-swift.jpg

Releasing a film adaptation of The Giver in 2014 was always going to be tricky.

Why? Because Lois Lowry’s kid-lit classic, first published in 1993, helped to invent the tropes of dystopian young adult fiction. (Even though, as its Newbery Medal would attest, it’s actually meant for middle-grade readers; yes, young adult and middle-grade are different.)  The Hunger Games, Divergent, Delirium, Matched, The Maze Runner — they’re all indebted to Lowry, even if each of those later books is less lyrical and more literal than Lowry’s original.

But now that there’s a glut of dystopian YA fiction — both on bookshelves and at multiplexes — a film version of The Giver runs the risk of seeming both generic and derivative… even though its story was written long before Katniss was even a twinkle in Suzanne Collins’s eye. Thankfully, a faithful adaptation of Lowry’s story would help to curb those accusations, since the book is really pretty different from the works it inspired: The Giver has no real action sequences. Its main character is a thoughtful 12-year-old boy, not a brooding, badass teenage warrior. The entire narrative takes place in fewer than 200 pages — a far cry from the increasingly bloated tomes being churned out by present-day YA authors.

The Weinstein Company’s new Giver movie is… not that faithful adaptation. How do we know? Because of the film’s first trailer:

READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos

Advertisement

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP