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Category: Books (21-30 of 420)

10 reasons Lifetime is bonkers (and brilliant) for making a 'Flowers in the Attic' sequel

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It is a truth universally acknowledged that Flowers in the Attic — V.C. Andrews’ neo-gothic, incest-laden trashterpiece — is utterly, utterly nuts. To wit: The plot revolves around a beautiful idiot named Corrine who keeps her four children locked on the top floor of a creepy old mansion while she tries to convince their estranged, incredibly wealthy grandfather to write her back into his will. (She’ll get no money if her father knows she has kids.) Why can’t this woman, I don’t know, support her family by getting a job? Because shut up, that’s why!

If you’ve ever devoured the book — especially as a guilty but enthralled teenager — you know that what happens next is even more ridiculous: The kids learn that their father was also their mother’s half-uncle. (Raise your hand if you didn’t know half-uncles were a thing before Flowers in the Attic). Their wicked, Bible-thumping grandmother beats them, starves them, covers eldest sister Cathy’s hair with tar, and won’t stop insinuating that Cathy and her older brother Chris totally want to bone. Cathy and Chris do, in fact, totally bone. (Actually, he rapes her, but Andrews is so twisted that she implies Cathy was asking for it.) And that’s before their youngest brother Cory dies because — drum roll — their mother’s been poisoning them with arsenic-laced doughnuts for months.

Death by doughnut! Truly, Flowers in the Attic is without equal — or so you’ll think until you read its sequel, Petals on the Wind.

On Thursday, Lifetime announced that it’s already planning to bring Petals to the small screen for the first time — even though the network’s new adaptation of Flowers won’t premiere until Jan. 18. This is, in short, an insane, baffling, possibly genius idea — and here’s why.
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Help us solve the mystery! Who's your favorite Sherlock Holmes? -- POLL

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle first introduced Sherlock Holmes to the world in his 1887 novel A Study in Scarlet. Since then, the London-based detective best known for his logic, use of disguises, and overall ability to solve just about anything has been portrayed on screens both big and small. From Basil Rathbone’s 1930′s version of the character, featuring his signature pipe, to Benedict Cumberbatch’s recent adaptation, every Sherlock has a little something different to offer its audience.

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This Week's Cover: David Fincher shoots 'Gone Girl' EW cover with Ben Affleck

When Entertainment Weekly approached Twentieth Century Fox about getting an exclusive inside look at the making of Gone Girl, an adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s 2012 smash best-selling novel due in theaters Oct. 3, the studio came back with a surprising reply: Director David Fincher was offering to shoot the cover himself. Not being crazy enough to turn down the Oscar-nominated provocateur who directed The Social Network, we said yes. Fincher dreamed up the image, which features Ben Affleck as Nick Dunne curled around his wife, Amy, played by Rosamund Pike. The result is an unsettling portrait of love gone demented. READ FULL STORY

Lucasfilm, Marvel partner for new 'Star Wars' comics

After more than 20 years, the force is with Marvel once again.

Disney announced Friday that two of its subsidiaries — Lucasfilm and Marvel Entertainment — are working together on a series of new Star Wars comic books.

The brand’s first comics were originally published by Marvel in the ’70s, back before both companies had been acquired by Disney. In 1991, the license for the comics was purchased by Dark Horse, which has published the titles ever since. Now the rights have returned to Marvel, which plans to release its first new-new Star Wars comics and graphic novels in 2015.

Perhaps uncoincidentally, 2015 is also the year that J.J. Abrams’ yet-untitled Star Wars film is scheduled to hit theaters.
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I'm Still Not Over... How Ginny was butchered in the 'Harry Potter' films

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It’s a conversation any books-first Harry Potter fan is all too familiar with: You’re talking about how wonderful Harry Potter is (because just because it’s nearly 2014 doesn’t mean you’re stopping that conversation any time soon), and your friend brings up that it doesn’t make any sense Harry wound up with Ginny Weasley of all people, because Ginny is the worst.

I’m sorry. This isn’t true at all! That’s just what Warner Brothers inexplicably wanted you to think because of the fact Ginny was in roughly 20 minutes of the entire franchise (time spent nearly dying in the Chamber of Secrets when she was 11 not included). Ginny is a really cool girl who becomes a really cool lady and –bonus! — through her J.K. Rowling taught teenage readers a lot of really valuable lessons about being yourself, owning your own accomplishments, and not waiting around for guys (well, at least not too much). READ FULL STORY

Adapt This: Wally Lamb's 'I Know This Much Is True'

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There’s nothing new under the sun — but somehow, these awesome properties have never been adapted for screens big or small. Psst, Hollywood: Let’s change that.

There are many great books that have never been adapted for the screen, and quite a few of them are better off because of it. Keeping that in mind, I’m hesitant to recommend such a great book undergo the adaptation process, but the more I think about how good an adaptation of Wally Lamb’s I Know This Much Is True could be, the more I know I have to put the thought out into the universe.

Today, there’s almost nothing a viewer loves more than a good twist. That’s the thing that gets people to tweet about a film or a television show. And that’s only one reason why I Know This Much Is True would make for a great big-screen drama. READ FULL STORY

J.K. Rowling writing 'Harry Potter' prequel... for the stage

Harry Potter is coming to the stage.

J.K. Rowling says she is working on a play about the boy wizard’s life before he attended Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry.

Rowling said in a statement Friday that the play will “explore the previously untold story of Harry’s early years as an orphan and outcast. “

Rowling will be a co-producer on the show, along with veteran theater producers Sonia Friedman and Colin Callender. The statement said Rowling will collaborate with a writer but will not write the script herself.

Writer and director have yet to be chosen. No opening date has been set for the show.

Rowling’s Harry Potter novels have sold more than 450 million copies around the world and were adapted into eight Warner Bros. feature films.

'Top of the Morning': Who should play Matt Lauer and Ann Curry in Lifetime movie?

Top of the Morning, former New York Times reporter Brian Stelter’s gossip-y, inside view documentation about the ratings wars between Good Morning America and the Today show, is in early development to become a Lifetime movie, EW has confirmed. Which means it’s time to dream cast it.

The book — read EW’s original review  — centers around the time when Ann Curry was let go from Today, so expect plenty of backstage explosions, as well as on-air passive aggressive comments,  from whomever is chosen to portray Matt Lauer, Ann Curry, Al Roker and all the rest. The story also get into booking wars, Robin Roberts’ cancer battle, and more.

Below, check out some of our dream casting pics for the television movie, and then tell us who you would like to see in those anchor chairs. READ FULL STORY

UPDATE: 'The Fault in Our Stars': We need to talk about that tagline

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The poster for the film you’re going to sob your way through come June is here.

The first look at The Fault in Our Stars promo art has arrived (see it above) and depicts stars Shailene Woodley and Ansel Elgort lying on the grass face to face, young and in love. It’s all very sad and bittersweet and exactly how it should be; I particularly love that the studio isn’t shying away from showing Woodley with the oxygen tubes. Things were pretty dang perfect until I read the tagline: “One sick love story.”

Wait, what? That’s awfully glib for a film that’s going to depict the story of two teenagers who meet at a cancer support group and are dying. While I obviously get that taglines need to be quick and quip-y, this seems a little bit too far, right? There’s smart and then there’s groan-worthy. Should we all be looking forward to cancer puns as this movie’s promotion really gets going? Is a first trailer with “Was my stomach doing flip-flops because of Augustus or my cancer meds?” next? READ FULL STORY

This week's cover: The Best and Worst of 2013

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We know you’re excited to watch the ball drop and ring in the new year, but you wouldn’t want to say goodbye to 2013 without first reviewing pop culture’s high points (Gravity! Orange is the New Black!), low points (Big Brother, What Would Ryan Lochte Do?), and, uh, divisive points (pretty much anything involving Miley Cyrus and/or the word “twerk”), would you? Of course not!

EW’s annual Best and Worst issue remembers the most delectable and most cringe-worthy entertainment moments of the year — and highlights the performances that stood above the rest. A small sample? James Spader on The Blacklist, Cecily Strong on SNL, Chiwetel Ejiofor in 12 Years a Slave, Amy Adams in American Hustle, Beyonce at the Super Bowl, and even James Franco in Spring Breakers. (Yep, we said it.)
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