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Category: Books (91-100 of 445)

Aziz Ansari's relationship book could use these seven Tom Haverford tips -- VIDEO

Parks and Recreation app-and-zert enthusiast Tom Haverford fancies himself a ladies’ man, and apparently so does the man beneath Tom’s suit and tie, Aziz Ansari: The comedian/actor announced today that he’s writing a relationship guidebook for the modern, tech-obsessed dating scene.

“You know when you text someone you’re romantically interested in and you don’t hear anything back and then you see them post a photo of a pizza on Instagram? That’s exactly what I want this book to deal with,” Ansari said in a press release announcing his book deal.

The thing is, Tom Haverford has been unveiling bits and pieces relevant to this exact book every week for the past five years on the NBC comedy. So we’ll help Aziz get started (writer’s block afflicts every new author!) by giving him some jumping-off points from his Pawnee alter ego:
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Would Jane Austen approve of 'Austenland,' other adaptations?

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single Jane Austen female fan in possession of brains and brawn must be in want of an enjoyable/believable Jane Austen movie from Hollywood. But not every Austen adaptation gets it right.

Austenland — about a 30-something woman obsessed with all things Austen who decides to drain her bank account for a trip to a Jane Austen theme park — was released Friday in select theaters.

The film, directed by Jerusha Hess (co-writer of Napoleon Dynamite), is the latest Austenalia adaptation in a messy (but consistent) string of zany romantic comedies, historical re-enactments, books, and stage iterations over the past decade. Jane Austen fandom is alive and well, what with that Colin Firth statue, her face on currency, and Hollywood studios’ constant churning-out of movies riffing off the author’s astute critical eye for social niceties and, most of all, romance.

A quick glance on IMDb for Jane Austen (who has her own entry) shows several adaptations and miniseries galore on the precipice. But with her rampant popularity, loyal fanbase, and Hollywood’s obvious interest, would Jane Austen actually approve of these movies bearing her name?

Let’s take a look at some of the Austen adaptations over the years and do a bit of analysis. (Note: I’ve left out most of the verbatim book adaptations and stuck to big releases and inspired screenplays.)
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The 'Stranger' tease: Five theories about J.J. Abrams' newest pop culture mystery

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J.J. Abrams cast a meaty hook into the Web waters on Aug. 19, a teaser for a new entertainment project that we may or may not know anything about. The mystery box angler loves using this kind of bait: “Stranger” is reminiscent of his puzzling promo stuff for Super-8 or the crypto-content that the Lost brain trust used to feed fans during hiatus. (Remember “The Last Supper” ads prior to season 6?) Decoding this kind of stuff isn’t for everyone. And for some, it annoys as much as it amuses. Regardless: We’re biting. Because we are easily amused, and because we ran out of Breaking Bad analysis to read, and because no one  knows how to bait a hook quite like J.J. Abrams. We love how he turns marketing hype into storytelling fun. What’s “Stranger” about? Five theories — none of which involve Star Wars Episode VII (we assume it’s still wayyy too early for that). READ FULL STORY

PopWatch Planner: 'Teen Wolf' ends, 'You're Next' begins, and 'Dexter' goes hunting

Summer might be coming to an end, but like high school coaches always say, “It’s important to finish strong!” At least, that’s what we imagine them saying based on the television shows we’ve watched involving high school coaches. Regardless, grab your remotes, your movie tickets, and your reading glasses, because pop culture has a lot in store for you this week: READ FULL STORY

Chris Colfer takes EW's Pop Culture Personality Test -- VIDEO

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Ask Chris Colfer for his favorite villain in children’s entertainment, and he can’t help but pick the titular character from the second book in his The Land of Stories series, The Enchantress Returns: “I purposely tried to make her a little bit of all the classic villains,” he says of evil Ezmia, who resurfaces long after cursing Sleeping Beauty to strike fear in the fairy-tale world and beyond. “I say she’s deliciously evil.”

Also wicked: Colfer’s sense of humor when he recently stopped by EW to take our Pop Culture Personality Test. Watch the video below. READ FULL STORY

'Forbes' lists E.L. James as top-earning author

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E.L. James’ ought to revise the title of her publishing juggernaut, 50 Shades of Grey, to 50 Shades of cold hard cash.

After all, the author raked in an estimated $95 million this year, making her the world’s top-earning author, according to Forbes. READ FULL STORY

John Lewis' 'MARCH' brings the Civil Rights Movement to life

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The Civil Rights Movement transformed the United States in ways so fundamental it’s difficult for many to conceive that this nation once tolerated, and even encouraged, state-sanctioned discrimination.  Rights that all Americans take for granted were bitterly contested just a few decades ago, and without the courage and fortitude of a handful of individuals American society might be profoundly different. John Robert Lewis was one of those unlikely heroes that fought non-violently to make the United States a more just society.

Congressman Lewis, the former leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, was the youngest speaker at 1963’s March on Washington. Today Lewis, 73, is the elder statesmen of movement, the only person who delivered remarks at the Lincoln Memorial still living. Lewis brings his amazing story to a new generation with the publication of MARCH (Book One) the first part of a trilogy from Top Shelf Productions that will trace Lewis’ life from rural Alabama to the halls of power in Washington D.C.

MARCH, a collaboration between Lewis, longtime aide Andrew Aydin, and illustrator Nate Powell (Swallow Me Whole), follows Lewis from his boyhood as the son of tenant farmers to his participation in Nashville’s successful sit-in campaign to desegregate restaurants and lunch counters. MARCH offers a poignant portrait of an iconic figure that both entertains and edifies, and deserves to be placed alongside other historical graphic memoirs like Persepolis and MAUS.

We sat down with Rep. Lewis and Andrew Aydin to talk about the publication of the book one of MARCH. READ FULL STORY

PopWatch Planner: Liam Hemsworth stars in 'Paranoia,' Luke Bryan releases an album, Lifetime has a new original flick, and more

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Halfway through August and not sure what to do? Check out everything that’s on our pop culture radar this week: READ FULL STORY

PopWatch Planner: Matt Damon fights in 'Elysium,' 'The Bachelorette' finale, The Civil Wars return, and more

Ah, the first full week of August is upon thee! Let’s see what pop culture has in store for us this week. READ FULL STORY

Drunk Ron Weasley celebrates Harry's birthday (and looks familiar) on 'Fallon' -- VIDEO

As any good witch- or wizard-wannabe knows, the Boy Who Lived isn’t much of a boy anymore. In fact, he turned 33 yesterday — on a date that also happens to be Harry Potter mastermind J.K. Rowling’s own birthday. (There must be some powerful magic at work every July 31.)

Naturally, Harry’s fans and celebrated the big day by writing fawning online tributes, making elaborate cakes, and admiring all seven of Kazu Kibuishi’s new covers for the series. And then there was Harry’s best friend Ron Weasley, who decided to fete his friend by singing a special song on Late Night With Jimmy Fallon… and chugging something that looks a little stronger than butterbeer.

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