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Author: Hillary Busis (1-10 of 1275)

Who's the biggest monster on 'Scandal': Rowan or Cyrus?

Talk about a clash of the chatty titans.

Scandal isn’t short on unsavory characters. In this universe, torture set against a bouncy Motown tune is de rigueur; each episode features at least two or three or nine betrayals. At this point in the show’s run, practically everyone but baby Teddy Grant has killed somebody, either directly or indirectly. Still, there’s no denying that the show’s two most ruthless, dastardly, outright evil characters are White House Chief of Staff Cyrus Beene and CIA bigwig Rowan Pope.

Thursday night’s season finale confirmed that neither of these men is to be trifled with, unless you want to be blown up and/or stuck with a rare strain of meningitis on live television. But which is actually the least redeemable presence on Scandal? For that, we’ll have to consider each villain’s history in a series of categories. READ FULL STORY

The 20 Best Summer Blockbusters of All Time: 'The Sixth Sense'

In the post-Lady in the Water era, it’s tough to remember how bonkers people once went for The Sixth Sense. But a mere millennium ago, M. Night Shyamalan’s atmospheric thriller was the toast of audiences and critics alike — a box office smash, a cultural touchstone, a freakin’ Best Picture nominee. Not only at the MTV Movie Awards, but also at the Oscars!

How did a simple, potentially gimmicky ghost story capture our hearts and minds so fully? Easy: because despite the shadow hindsight casts upon it, The Sixth Sense is a great movie. Its brief 107-minute run time means not a scene is wasted; its creepy visuals are arresting and inventive; its performances are perfectly calibrated, from Bruce Willis’s tortured psychologist to Mischa Barton’s unearthly shade. (Though really, Night — did you need to name Haley Joel Osment’s character Cole Sear? Even in his early days, the guy couldn’t help himself.)

And most importantly, The Sixth Sense‘s game-changing twist manages to be both surprising and inevitable — making a viewer who doesn’t see it coming feel in awe of the film’s craft, not like the victim of a cheap trick. Even if you do anticipate the whole ghost thing, you can still admire the subtlety of Shyamalan’s work. The movie has layers, people — and I mean that sincerely. Let’s peel them back for the latest installment of EW’s Best Summer Blockbusters countdown.

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'Game of Thrones': The 9 most satisfying deaths

The Red God of Death is no stranger to Westeros. Or Essos, for that matter.

When we talk about the Game of Thrones characters who have shuffled off (or, more accurately, been shoved off) this mortal coil, we tend to focus on the show’s most shocking demises – which often strike GoT‘s most noble, likable characters. (Think of the Red Wedding, or Ned’s brutal decapitation, or even the end of Qhorin Halfhand, which admittedly has more oomph in A Clash of Kings than it did on the show.) But those gut-punching sequences are only one piece of the puzzle. As anyone who’s watched “The Lion and the Rose” can attest, Thrones also excels in meting out justice to despicable folks in spectacular ways.

So on the occasion of The Big Thing That Happened Sunday, let’s take a look back at the Thrones deaths most likely to have viewers pumping their fists — instead of clutching their faces in sorrow. READ FULL STORY

Sunday TV showdown: What will you watch?

A Dramacalypse is upon us.

Mad Men. Game of Thrones. The Good WifeOnce Upon a TimeCalifornication, if you’re into that kind of thing. They’re all airing new episodes this Sunday — and so are comedies like Veep and Silicon Valley. And reality staples like The Amazing Race. And the MTV Movie Awards. All this, plus a new hour of NBC’s Believe — what’s a couch potato to do? READ FULL STORY

Seth Rogen hosts 'Saturday Night Live' this weekend: Talk about it here!

You know what’s weird? Though tonight marks Seth Rogen’s third stint as SNL host, I realized before writing this post that I couldn’t remember a single sketch he’d done during either of his previous turns. Maybe that’s because it’s been a surprisingly long time since Rogen graced the SNL stage; the last time he was on, he was promoting 2009′s Observe and Report. (The first time he hosted was another era altogether; the 2007 episode featured jabs at Kevin Federline, Senator Larry Craig, and multiple MacGruber sketches.)

More likely, though, it’s because Rogen’s hosting style isn’t particularly flashy. In movies, he gravitates toward genial, laid-back sensitive bro types; in his past stints on SNL, he’s done much of the same, give or take a pair of Muppets sketches that had him donning a big, furry suit. (Dear Internet: Why is “Muppets Hit & Run” not available anywhere online? This is a travesty!) Rogen isn’t much of an impressionist, or an insanely energetic, up-for-anything quintuple threat type — he’s more of a Jason Sudeikis-esque everyguy, but nerdier and schlubier and more likely to talk about being Jewish. (And he’s hosting just in time for Passover — what a mensch.)

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Stephen Colbert on taking over for Letterman: 'Those are some huge shoes to fill -- and some really big pants'

“One thing before we get started,” Stephen Colbert said at the beginning of Thursday’s Colbert Report. “There was some big news last week that slipped through my news-crack. It concerned someone I’ve admired for years, and yet, surprisingly, is not me.”

Colbert was speaking, of course, about David Letterman — who revealed on April 3 that he’s leaving CBS’s Late Show in 2015. Just one week later, word broke that his desk will be inherited by none other than Colbert himself. (By which I mean the actual Stephen Colbert — not the character he’s been playing on the Report since 2005.)

“Dave has been on the air my entire adult life,” Colbert continued. “Late Night debuted my first night in college. I learned more from watching Dave than I did from going to my classes, especially the ones I did not go to because I had stayed up till 1:30 watching Dave.

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'Top Chef' favorites want you to eat Oreo-crusted chicken fingers -- VIDEO

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Watch out, Cap’n Crunch Buffalo chicken tenders — there’s a new stoner snack in town.

That’s right: The chicken strips pictured above are dredged in flour, dipped in an egg wash, then shaken in a plastic bag with a mixture of parsley, salt, pepper, panko breadcrumbs… and, oh yeah, 15 cookies’ worth of Oreo wafers. (The vanilla kind. You know, because using the chocolate kind would be gross.) READ FULL STORY

So, who should replace Stephen Colbert?

Caveat: There’s no guarantee that Comedy Central will program another topical nightly talk show in The Colbert Report‘s place when Stephen Colbert leaves to take over CBS’s Late Show in 2015.

After all, Colbert isn’t just another late night gabfest — it’s a parody of a very specific type of news program, starring a character who’s a very specific caricature of folks like Bill O’Reilly and Rush Limbaugh. (Limbaugh, naturally, has already spoken out against Colbert’s move to CBS, saying that the network has “declared war on the heartland of America.”) It would be strange and sad to see Comedy Central try to capture similar lightning in a similar bottle by ordering another show that parodies cable news the same way Colbert did.

That said, I can’t see the network scrambling to find a whole week’s worth of new programming for the 11:30 timeslot — and if it’s going to go with another nightly program, some sort of talk show revolving around some sort of central comedic figure would make the most sense. So, with that in mind, here are eight options for Colbert replacements — both realistic and more pie-in-the-sky.

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The 20 Best Summer Blockbusters of All Time: 'Back to the Future'

Imagine a twisted world in which Back to the Future, a zany fable starring Eric Stoltz as Marty McFly and John Lithgow as Doc Brown — a mad scientist with a pet chimpanzee — is released by Disney in May 1985. The film ends with Marty traveling to a nuclear test site in Nevada and escaping the past via time-traveling refrigerator.

Not to mix our references, but this would indeed be the darkest timeline.

Thankfully, script rewrites, casting changes, and the power of Steven Spielberg’s Amblin Entertainment combined to transform that possible Back to the Future into the one that was actually released in July 1985 — featuring the pitch-perfect pair of Michael J. Fox and Christopher Lloyd, as well as just the right mix of delightful sci-fi mumbo-jumbo (1.21 gigawatts of electricity!), instantly quotable dialogue (“So, why don’t you make like a tree and get outta here?”), and squicky edge (“You’re my ma….? But you’re so h… so… thin!“). From its clock-filled opening title sequence to that chills-inducing final frame — one of the best sequel setups of all time – Back to the Future is thoroughly enjoyable. But as a truly original popcorn flick with substance and style to spare? It’s damn near perfect. READ FULL STORY

Yeah, Kate Mulgrew doesn't really think the sun revolves around the Earth

(Wait, what?)

So here’s the situation: On Monday, word broke that Kate Mulgrew — best known these days for playing Red on Orange Is the New Black – is the narrator of an upcoming documentary called The Principle. Spoiler alert: The principle is that contrary to Copernicus and, you know, centuries of documented science, the sun revolves around the Earth.

This is notable for several reasons, including but not limited to these:

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