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Author: Hillary Busis (1-10 of 1359)

And here are the movies you absolutely shouldn't watch with your whole family

Yesterday, we passed along a few guidelines for choosing the perfect family-pleasing post-Thanksgiving film. Today, we’re gonna do the opposite—namely, detailing the movies we (mistakenly) thought were safe for cross-generational viewing, only to discover that we were horribly, horribly wrong.

Learn from us, gentle readers: Don’t stream any of these picks after your holiday meal… unless you want to make pie time super awkward. READ FULL STORY

PopWatch Prescription: Movies the whole family can enjoy (really!)

For many families, the most stressful part of Thanksgiving isn’t figuring out a way to keep turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes, green bean casserole, yams, and Parker House rolls hot all at the same time. Instead, it’s finding the perfect post-tryptophan-overdose, pre-nap viewing—something capable of entertaining your hyperactive-five-year-old, your too-cool teenage nephew, your weird aunt, and your 94-year-old Great-Grandma Dot… all at the same time. Just call it a quest for the White Whale of movies—or at least the cinematic equivalent of the traveling pants.

That’s where we come in. EW’s brain trust has come up with a few simple guidelines that should help you find the perfect family film. Obviously, all families are unique, and every idea might not work for every clan; EW.com news editor Ashley Fetters, for instance, swears she knows a family that makes a point of watching Werner Herzog’s Grizzly Man over the holidays. Still, general consensus led us to these five basic rules. (Psst: If you need even more guidance, our list of 55 Movies Your Child Must See is another good starting point.) READ FULL STORY

Cameron Diaz hosts 'Saturday Night Live' this weekend -- talk about it here!

It pains me to write this, but: Cameron Diaz has had a rough few years, career-wise. For the past half-decade, she’s starred mostly in films that failed critically, commercially, or both. The role call: Sex Tape, The Other Woman, The Counselor, Gambit (which wasn’t even released theatrically in the US), What to Expect When You’re Expecting, The Green HornetKnight and Day, and The Box. (A few exceptions: Bad Teacher, which got mixed reviews but grossed over $100 million—enough to inspire both a quickly-canceled CBS sitcom and a sequel, which is still in development—My Sister’s Keeper, which landed more with a “meh” than a thud, and Shrek Forever After, which of course made approximately one bajillion dollars.)

Despite all this, though, Diaz still carries an A-list sheen; hearing that she’s coming back to SNL doesn’t inspire the same trepidation as hearing that, say, her costar in The Mask was returning to the show. Why? Maybe because no matter what’s happened over the past two decades or so, Diaz still seems like the ultimate Cool Girl—both in the Gillian Flynn sense, and also according to a more general definition of the term (a likable woman). Seeing her pop up on screen is sort of like seeing an old friend—even if you can’t really remember the last time you and that friend did something really fun together.

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60 reasons 'All Dogs Go to Heaven' is the most disturbing kids' movie ever made

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25 years ago today, an animated musical hit theaters—and soon became a beloved classic that sparked a franchise including multiple feature-length sequels, a TV spinoff that ran for three seasons, and oodles of merch.

That movie… is The Little Mermaid. Strangely enough, though, the same description fits All Dogs Go to Heaven, Don Bluth’s lighthearted romp about a very bad dog and the little girl who teaches him how to love. Aww. Except All Dogs is also a horrifying phantasmagoria of murder, demons, drinking, gambling, hellfire, and blue eyeshadow. Sure, this is all sort of par for the course for Bluth; the former Disney animator has a reputation for making movies that skew much darker than the ones made by his former studio. That said: In retrospect, it’s remarkable that All Dogs was (a) released into theaters as is, (b) somehow considered a children’s movie, and (c) transformed into the kind of property that’s immortalized via Kids Meal toys.

Sure, movies like Watership Down might give the flick a run for its money. But after rewatching All Dogs, I feel pretty confident in saying that this is the most upsetting (ostensible) kids’ movie ever made. Why? Let me count the ways.

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Woody Harrelson hosts 'Saturday Night Live': Talk about it here!

Will the odds be in Woody Harrelson’s favor when he hosts Saturday Night Live tonight? Let’s examine the evidence.

Pro: He has hosted the show twice before (and did a cameo in host Kirstie Alley’s monologue back in ’91, along with the rest of the Cheers gang), so he understands what’s expected of him and should be fairly comfortable coming back to Studio 8H. Con: He hasn’t hosted since the Bush administration. The first Bush administration.

Harrelson’s last SNL stint began with a cold open about Johnny Carson leaving The Tonight Show; characters appearing on the episode included Adam Sandler’s Opera Man and a Rob Schneider invention called “Jeff, the Sensitive Naked Man.” Harrelson’s big sketch revolved around his boyish good looks and perfectly sculpted chest. Another ended with a Rodney King joke. In short: It was a different time.

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Mallory Ortberg summarizes classic books in 140 characters or less

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In Texts from Jane Eyre, Mallory Ortberg imagines conversations between a host of different literary characters, authors, and innocent bystanders. (The one through-line? Most of them are terrible jerks.) Because the humorist and Toast cofounder is also a practiced Twitter whiz, we decided to give her another challenge: Sum up nine great works of fiction—yes, Sweet Valley High counts—without going over the site’s notoriously slim character limit. Here’s what she came up with. (P.S. High schoolers: You’re still gonna have to read the actual books.)

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See pretty people get stoned in new 'High Maintenance' trailer

Looking for tokin’ fare that’s a little more sophisticated than How High? Try Katja Blichfeld and Ben Sinclair’s web series High Maintenance, which follows a good-natured, unnamed weed dealer (played by Sinclair) as he travels around New York City, delivering his wares to a diverse clientele. (Previous purchasers have included Downton Abbey‘s Dan Stevens as a cross-dressing Brooklyn dad and Broad City‘s Hannibal Burress as… a comedian. So maybe not all the roles are a stretch.)

After four short, independently-produced “seasons” of 13 total installments, the series is being funded by Vimeo—as Vimeo on Demand’s inaugural original program—for its next cycle of episodes. Three new shorts debut online Nov. 11, while the second group of three premieres in early 2015, but you can catch a sneak peek at the smokey shenanigans in the exclusive trailer below. Needless to say, it’s a BYOP kind of deal. (The “P” stands for “popcorn,” duh.)

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Chris Rock and Prince do 'Saturday Night Live' tonight: Talk about it here

Chris Rock—writer, director, actor, comedian, Emmy winner, Grammy winner, former Oscar host, and all-around likable dude despite his tendency to make Grown Ups movies—is hosting SNL Saturday night, for only the second time ever, and the first time since 1996. (At the time, Rock was only a few years removed from being a cast member on Saturday Night Live himself.)

But you’d barely know this going by the episode’s two sets of promos—both of which focus exclusively on how exciting it is that Prince is also coming back to Studio 8H. (The Purple One hasn’t been on Saturday Night Live in awhile either, though his last visit came more recently than Rock’s.) Rock himself seems more jazzed about Prince’s appearance than his own—even though Prince couldn’t be bothered to show up for the second promo reel, which traditionally features both host and musical guest.

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Chris Rock's 'SNL' promos are mostly about Prince

But really, can you blame him?

Sure, former Saturday Night Live cast member Chris Rock returning to host the show for the first time since 1996—his musical guest was The Wallflowers! The Wallflowers!—is a pretty big deal. But even Rock admits it’s not quite as exciting as the presence of the Purple One, whose Nov. 1 performance will take the format of one uninterrupted eight-minute jam session. (Daylight Saving Time ends at 2 a.m. on Nov. 2, giving some viewers an extra hour on Sunday to replay that eight-minute jam session over and over.)

So even though The Artist doesn’t actually show up in these promos—unless you count Bobby Moynihan’s impish impression of him—Prince is basically the invisible star.

Also all over the video: Unfamous people filming its filming on their phones, which is what happens when you decide to shoot the promos in the middle of Rockefeller Center. What a time to be alive. READ FULL STORY

Jim Carrey hosts 'Saturday Night Live' this weekend -- talk about it here!

SUNDAY UPDATE: Click over for a full recap of SNL with Jim Carrey and Iggy Azalea

ORIGINAL POST: All righty then.

Sorry—I know that reference is as painfully dated as this Austin Powers costume. But it’s tough not to think about Jim Carrey’s best-known roles as we consider the actor’s third SNL outing—and, to be honest, to consider how long it’s been since he last made a great comedy. READ FULL STORY

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