PopWatch Entertainment Weekly's PopWatch Blog

VIDEO: Secrets behind J.J. Abrams' lens flare revealed (you'll be surprised)

J-J-Abrams-Lens-Flare-Video.jpg

Have you ever noticed a subtle light glowing in one of J.J. Abrams’ films? Probably not. I mean, with Captain Kirk in the frame…

But Luke Knezevic has certainly paid attention to Abrams’ penchant for the technique, prompting him to make a comedy short revealing the truth behind the lens flare. Turns out that flash of light is actually an actor.

Meet Lorenzo Flarius, the Human Lens Flare. Abrams “discovered” Flarius after hitting him with his car. Feeling guilty, the director placed the wannabe actor—who essentially has a flashlight for a head—in his films. Like, all of his films. In multiple scenes. Flarius even refers to himself as “the hardest working man in show biz.”

Flarius’ roommate is less impressed by the actor. (“He’s just an overpaid human flashlight!”) Watch the drama ensue below, and find out which Abrams project Flarius will appear in next.

'The Bourne Supremacy' 10 years later: Does the action hold up?

There’s certainly no shortage of fights, explosions, and car chases to witness onscreen these days, but much of the action is, frankly, dull—the result of a tired series or a simple lack of creativity.

Just over a decade ago, however, the Bourne Identity set the action bar high. And since today is the tenth anniversary of the franchise’s second film, The Bourne Supremacy, we’re taking a look back at how the series got action right, how it has weathered the last 10 years, and what action films circa 2014 can learn from the trilogy.

Doug Liman, executive producer, and Dan Bradley, stunt coordinator and second unit director, both agree: The action in The Bourne Supremacy—and the trilogy as a whole—stands up because it’s character-driven. It’s in the vein of The French Connection’s signature car chase, featuring Gene Hackman’s Doyle pounding his fists as he attempts to catch up to a train he’s pursuing.

[Note: Liman directed and produced The Bourne Identity, and executive produced The Bourne Supremacy and The Bourne Ultimatum. Bradley served as stunt coordinator and second unit director for The Bourne Supremacy, The Bourne Ultimatum, and The Bourne Legacy. For the purposes of this story, we are focusing on the three original Bourne films.]

“There’s so many action movies where the dialogue and the character scenes are just an excuse to get you to the next action scene,” Liman says. “The action scenes are the reason the film exists.” Liman recognizes this problem in many of this summer’s releases, believing that these films would be “unwatchable” if you took the action out of them. READ FULL STORY

Here's how 'Supernatural' star Misha Collins is breaking world records

Supernatural‘s Misha Collins spends most of the year fighting demons (and sometimes angels) in a trench coat. And when Supernatural returns for it’s tenth season, Collins promises that between trying to find Dean and solving the problem of his own fading grace, Castiel will once again have his hands full. But until then, the 39-year-old actor is keeping busy by breaking world records alongside Orlando Jones and William Shatner. But why?

Well, because he can. August 2-9 will mark the fourth annual GISHWES, the Greatest International Scavenger Hunt the World Has Ever Seen, which Collins launched after being inspired by an annual scavenger hunt he participated in when he was an undergraduate at the University of Chicago. “It used to be a very academically rigorous and a very socially dismal place,” Collins says. “The only social interaction we had was in the basement of the library where there was a little coffee shop. We didn’t even have a student center. There was a study commissioned at the University of Chicago of the top 300 universities, and we ranked 300 out of 300 for social life. [We were] the very, very worst—under the Naval Academy, I might add. [But] we had this one bright spot on the calendar, which was a campus-wide scavenger hunt. Everyone basically stopped going to classes and stopped doing anything and just participated in the scavenger hunt for four days. And it was just so much fun.” READ FULL STORY

'80s TV stars sing 'Let It Go'

alf.jpg

While listening to Frozen’s “Let It Go,” have you ever thought, “Patrick Stewart and/or a bunch of other ’80s TV stars would make this gem even better”? No? Well, video producer Jim Cliff went ahead and edited together clips from over 60 different ’80s television shows to make a new, Tom Selleck-filled version of “Let It Go” anyway—and yes, Stewart’s Captain Jean-Luc Picard even joins in on the chorus.

READ FULL STORY

See The Rock join Jimmy Fallon for an old-school workout

When Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson stopped by The Tonight Show to promote his new film Hercules, Jimmy Fallon asked about Johnson’s workout routine. From there, Johnson and Fallon put on some killer wigs, reenacted classic workout VHS tapes, and even perfected the art of the “squat thrust” as The Fungo Brothers.

As the Fungo Brothers always say, “You gotta hustle for the muscle!” READ FULL STORY

Celebrate Batman Day with rare set photos from the 60s TV series

Today is Batman Day, the one day of the year DC Comics has set aside to commemorate the Caped Crusader’s 75th anniversary. Over those 75 years, Batman has taken on a variety of interpretations both in comics and pop culture, from Frank Miller’s definitive Year One to the lauded 90s animated series.

However, the first to truly capture the nation’s imagination was the 1966 television show starring Adam West. To celebrate the character’s milestone birthday, browse through Life‘s series of rare set photos that went unpublished in the magazine’s famous March 1966 cover story on the show. It’s a great peek at the making of a classic show that defined the character in the public consciousness for 23 years. READ FULL STORY

Broadway's Aladdin and Jasmine face off with Disney trivia

Adam-Jacobs-Courtney-Reed.jpg

2014 marks the 20th anniversary of Disney Theatrical Productions—so Adam Jacobs and Courtney Reed, better known as the two stars of Disney’s Aladdin on Broadway, took time off from their magic carpet jaunts to drop by EW’s video studio and talk all things Disney.

EW decided to pit Aladdin against Jasmine as we tested the princely pair’s knowledge of the Mouse House’s stage hits, from 1994’s Beauty and the Beast to 2012’s Newsies and beyond. Both Jacobs and Reed have an exceptional amount of Disney trivia stored up there.

READ FULL STORY

'Better Call Saul' has a real-life billboard, working phone number

Fans expect a lot from Better Call Saul. Since the show takes place before, during, and after Breaking Bad, it’s got countless opportunities to showcase familiar faces (beyond Mike, who’s a series regular). Then there’s the smaller stuff: We want to see Saul with ridiculous hair, a bluetooth in his ear, and maybe a questionable massage appointment every once in a while. But as it turns out, Saul diehards have already gotten one of their wishes: the billboard. READ FULL STORY

A gif guide to Aviva's leg-gendary 'Real Housewives of New York' finale flip-out

It was the moment to which the Real Housewives of New York had been walking up all season: A prosthetic leg abandoned on a floor, a room aghast.

On Tuesday’s RHONY finale, cast member Aviva Drescher—who lost half of her left leg in a childhood accident—found herself under fire for allegedly faking illness to flake on group vacations, being too dependent on her husband, and possibly suffering from Münchausen syndrome. Outnumbered five to one, Aviva could barely get in a word edgewise (which says a lot when you’re the cousin of Fran Drescher).

So the Leggy Blonde did this:

READ FULL STORY

Survey finds gender pay gap in games industry narrower than US average

A recent industry survey of game developer’s salaries has found that the wage gap between genders is narrower than the national average.

Conducted by industry publication Gamasutra, the survey was conducted in May 2014 and covered the entirety of 2013, with 4,000 participants. The survey found that men working salaried jobs in the games industry make an average of $85,074 annually. For women, the average annual salary was $72,882—that’s 86 cents on the dollar.

Of course, the wage gap between genders widened or narrowed depending on what position was being considered. Designers have the smallest gap, with women making 94 cents for every dollar men make, and audio professionals the largest—68 cents on the dollar. The outlier is in Quality Assurance, where women make four cents more than men on average. It’s also the lowest-paid job of those surveyed. READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos

Advertisement

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP