PopWatch Entertainment Weekly's PopWatch Blog

'Turn' react: It's Jamie Bell's show after all

It was the third episode of Turn, AMC’s Revolutionary War spy thriller, but it sure felt more like a season premiere. Abraham Woodhull (Jamie Bell) had been a somewhat lackluster protagonist in the first two episodes, a farmer victimized by bad luck who has the added misfortune of consistently being the second or third smartest person in every room he’s in. This is the guy who’s going to help turn the tide for General Washington’s Continental Army by spying on the redcoats in New York? This is the guy who’s going to make history interesting for TV audiences who watch Mad Men and Boardwalk Empire? Not bloody likely. But the writers finally put Abe in position to “be a man…not just a petulant boy,” as his father barked at him at one point, and maybe, just maybe, Abe and Jamie Bell have got the goods. READ FULL STORY

Neil Patrick Harris yells at fan during 'Hedwig' performance

Neil Patrick Harris had the perfect response to an enamored fan who interrupted a recent performance of Hedwig and the Angry Inch.

“I love you, Neil!” a female admirer yelled out during the Broadway show, according to Page Six. In character, as the titular transgender East German punk, Harris responded: “I’m doing something up here, ­motherf–ker!”

Which, of course, was a much friendlier reaction than Hugh Jackman had that one time an audience member’s cell phone went off – twice — during his Broadway performance: READ FULL STORY

PopWatch Planner: 'Parks and Rec' finale, 'The Blacklist' big episode, 'John Oliver' premiere, and more

As some of your favorite shows wrap up, it’s also time for those summer shows to begin. This week alone has four premieres, as well as a few finales. And, of course, The Blacklist episode that cannot be missed. Well, not if you want to know who Tom Keen is.

Here’s what your pop culture week looks like: READ FULL STORY

James Franco and other celebs who just can't stand criticism

James Franco does not take criticism of his work lightly. Currently starring in Of Mice and Men on Broadway, the actor was quite displeased with the review New York Times theater critic Ben Brantley gave the revival. Though Brantley’s assessment was not excessively negative – he even complimented Franco’s talent at one point — the actor posted an incensed response to the review on Instagram, calling the critic “a little bitch.” The post has since been deleted.

Brantley responded to the criticism much more diplomatically than Franco. “I like Franco’s work on film a lot, and he didn’t disgrace himself on stage,” the writer told the New York Observer. “I hope he returns to Broadway some day. And of course he’s entitled to say whatever he likes about me, as long as it’s not libelous, and somehow I don’t think ‘little bitch’ qualifies.”

Franco is hardly the first celebrity to lash out over hurt feelings and bad reviews. Last year, Brantley was the target of another famous actor appearing on Broadway, Alec Baldwin. The NYT critic panned his show, a revival of Orphans, and Baldwin shot back with a bitter essay on the state of modern theater on The Huffington Post. READ FULL STORY

This Week on Stage: James Franco dishes, Audra McDonald dazzles (again)

Lesson learned this week on Broadway: if he does not like what you wrote about him, James Franco will call you “a little bitch”. Franco, who made his Broadway debut this week in Of Mice and Men opposite Bridesmaids charmer Chris O’Dowd, took on the New York Times’ Ben Brantley on Instagram, making it the 453rd silly thing he’s done this year. (Or is it incredibly shrewd and constant self-promotion? One cannot be sure.) In more benevolent news, a bevy of much-loved stage, film, and TV triple threats returned to their roots, including Audra McDonald (channeling the haunted spirit of Billie Holiday, and amazingly so at that), Tony Shalhoub (a nominee last year for Golden Boy and could be again this year), Annette Bening (owning the stage as early 1900s performer Ruth Draper), and the now-film-retired Steven Soderbergh, making a dent Off-Broadway with a new play by frequent collaborator Scott Z. Burns, starring Carrie‘s Chloë Grace Moretz.

(Click on the links below for full reviews)

READ FULL STORY

Is Gwen Stefani a good fit for 'The Voice'? -- POLL

The Voice has had its fair share of megastar mentors, starting with original quartet Christina Aguilera, Cee Lo Green, Adam Levine, and Blake Shelton. And the reality contest has been able to keep up its twice-a-year schedule by cycling out some of those judges with the equally star-powered Shakira and Usher.

So it comes as no surprise that Gwen Stefani might be the next superstar to join the NBC show. TMZ reports that it’s a done deal, while The Hollywood Reporter says the No Doubt singer is simply in talks, but NBC wouldn’t confirm the news when EW reached out for comment.

Whether the addition pans out and Stefani indeed replaces Aguilera in season 7 — which begins taping in June, airs in the fall, and includes another new judge in Pharrell Williams — let’s talk about what we think of the idea. There’s no question that she has an impressive career, both with No Doubt and as a solo artist, but how well do we know her personality? The Voice panel has thrived on the dynamic between the mentors, most notably with Blake and Adam’s bromance and Christina’s tension with the others. Where will Gwen fit in? It’s also worth noting that Stefani has worked with one of her potential chair-mates: Pharrell (with The Neptunes) produced her breakout solo single “Hollaback Girl,” and she contributed vocals to his 2005 solo single “Can I Have It Like That.”

So what do you think? Vote in our poll, and leave your thoughts in the comments section below: READ FULL STORY

'Salem' star Shane West knows nothing about 'Harry Potter' -- VIDEO

As far as first celebrity crushes go, Shane West’s childhood love for Cougar Town star Courteney Cox is anything but embarrassing. In fact, it’s adorable — like most of the answers he gave when he took EW’s Pop Culture Personality Test.

These days, when the Nikita alum isn’t answering our questions about his complete lack of Harry Potter knowledge (“I know it’s a bunch of young wizards fightin’ some old wizards”), he’s hard at work on his new show Salem, which premieres April 20 at 10 p.m. ET on WGN. (The show is the network’s first original scripted program.)

“It’s quite an edgy way to start the future of the network,” West said of the show’s launch. “I’m glad to be a part of it.”

Check out more from West’s chat below: READ FULL STORY

'Scandal' star Scott Foley's Reddit AMA: 9 things we learned

After Thursday night’s drama-filled third season finale of Scandal, Scott Foley (a.k.a. Jake Ballard) took some time to participate in a Reddit AMA. The chat mainly consisted of eager Gladiators wanting answers to their biggest fan questions, but there were also some personal ones (boxers or briefs?) and inquiries about his stint on another Shonda Rhimes soap (Grey’s Anatomy) as well his breakthrough role as Noel Crane on Felicity.

Below are nine things we learned from the conversation: READ FULL STORY

Who's the biggest monster on 'Scandal': Rowan or Cyrus?

Talk about a clash of the chatty titans.

Scandal isn’t short on unsavory characters. In this universe, torture set against a bouncy Motown tune is de rigueur; each episode features at least two or three or nine betrayals. At this point in the show’s run, practically everyone but baby Teddy Grant has killed somebody, either directly or indirectly. Still, there’s no denying that the show’s two most ruthless, dastardly, outright evil characters are White House Chief of Staff Cyrus Beene and CIA bigwig Rowan Pope.

Thursday night’s season finale confirmed that neither of these men is to be trifled with, unless you want to be blown up and/or stuck with a rare strain of meningitis on live television. But which is actually the least redeemable presence on Scandal? For that, we’ll have to consider each villain’s history in a series of categories. READ FULL STORY

'Salem' review: 'American Horror Story' lite

In the 17th-century saga of WGN America’s first-ever scripted series, Salem, black magic is legit, religion is an oppressive farce, and witches keep nipples in the dardnest places. The fiction reimagines infamous history. Those witch trials of Puritan-era Salem, Massachusetts? A conspiracy hatched by honest-to-God witches — a relatively gender-neutral term in this world; they can be female or male — as part of a takeover of the town. It’s hard to see why they’d be so hot for this piece of New World real estate. Salem’s an allegedly prosperous port — computer-generated ships mill in the harbor — but the joint’s one of those too clean, too hollow, small exterior/huge interior Hollywood period towns. But, hey: The secret occult takeover of the United States had to start somewhere. READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos

Advertisement

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP