Inside the Best Picture nominees: A deep dive into 'The Wolf of Wall Street'

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Name: The Wolf of Wall Street

Release date: Dec. 25, 2013

DVD release date: March 25, 2014

Run time: 2 hours, 59 minutes

Box office: Opening weekend: $18.4 million; Total domestic box office: $113 million; Worldwide gross to date: $338.5 million

Rotten Tomatoes score: 77 percent

Wolf of Wall Street movie math: (Goodfellas + Wall Street + The Hangover) x soft porn

Tweetable description: Jordan Belfort has a lot of money and even more quaaludes, but if the FBI has its way, his time on Wall Street is limited. #GETTHELUDES

What Chris Nashawaty said: Pay no attention to the title: Martin Scorsese’s new shoot-the-works epic The Wolf of Wall Street isn’t about rapacious stockbrokers or shady financial shenanigans. It’s about drugs. Lots and lots of drugs. From its twisted opening scene, where a floor of coked-up boiler-room meatheads toss dwarfs for bacchanalian sport, the feverishly paced film is hell-bent on making the audience feel like they just snorted a Belushian mountain of blow. You can practically feel your teeth grinding to dust. As with any high, though, it also doesn’t know when to stop.

Number of Oscar nods: Five — Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Supporting Actor, Best Adapted Screenplay

Movie’s Oscar history: For Scorsese, this Best Directing nod marks his 10th personal nomination for his work as either a writer or director. However, he’s only taken home one, for Best Director in 2007’s The Departed. For supporting actor Jonah Hill, this marks his second ever nomination. Meanwhile, The Wolf of Wall Street earned DiCaprio his fourth nomination; he’s yet to take home an Oscar.

What it has won thus far: Surprisingly, Wall Street has only taken home one award so far this season, a Golden Globe for Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture — Musical or Comedy.

Why it should win: The Wolf of Wall Street is yet another Oscar-caliber collaboration from Scorsese and DiCaprio. Not only are the performances award-worthy — including Matthew McConaughey’s short stint on screen — but the filmmaking itself is something to admire. Scorsese expertly ties together the many sides of Jordan Belfort’s story to present an absolutely ludicrous life of excess. And the script itself is full of just as much humor as it is big powerful DiCaprio speeches. It was an extreme story done extremely well.

Why it shouldn’t win: Wall Street is certainly not the best work we’ve seen from DiCaprio and Scorsese as a pair, and many argue that the main reason for that is the film’s length. Sure, the film was about excess, but they could’ve easily gotten the same point across in a shorter amount of time.

Vegas Odds: 25-1, according to Las Vegas Sports Betting

Best Line: “I will not die sober! Get the f—ing ludes!!!”

Worst Line: “You have my money taped to your tits. Technically, you do work for me.”

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