Jennifer Lawrence headlines TIME 100 list

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Image Credit: TIME

TIME magazine prefers to be diplomatic and doesn’t rank its list of the 100 Most Influential People in the World, which was announced today. But let’s be frank: in the world of entertainment, Jennifer Lawrence is nonpareil. The 22-year-old Oscar winner and star of the Hunger Games blockbuster franchise was lauded by none other than Jodie Foster, her director from The Beaver and one of the few actresses to attain Lawrence’s critical and popular success — and more importantly, know how to translate it into real influence.

“Sure, this girl can act. But, man, this girl can also just be,” Foster wrote, describing seeing early cuts of Lawrence’s Oscar-nominated performance in Winter’s Bone. “All of those painful secrets in her face, the feeling that there’s some terrible past that’s left impossibly angled bone and weariness in its wake. She’s worn from the pain of living — something none of her characters would ever have the energy to articulate. It’s just part of her, like skin and muscle. The good news is that Jen, her good-humored, ballsy, free-spirited alter ego with the husky voice and a propensity for junk food … Jen, the spritely tomboy from Kentucky — that Jen’s got it together. A hoot. A gem. A gem with a killer stare.”

Click below for a few of the other entertainment figures who made TIME’s list, with the tributes penned by admiring celebrities.

Beyoncé — “She’s gone beyond being a popular singer, even beyond being a pop-cultural icon. When Beyoncé does an album, when Beyoncé sings a song, when Beyoncé does anything, it’s an event, and it’s broadly influential. Right now, she is the heir-­apparent diva of the USA — the reigning national voice.” — Baz Luhrmann

Jimmy Fallon — “Picture this: I’m in the heart of an impromptu speech at my wedding reception in front of 150 guests, pouring it out to my lovely new bride. You could hear a pin drop. I paused for just a moment in between thoughts. And then there was Jimmy, shouting a joke from his seat, sparking an improv between the two of us that went on for a good five or 10 minutes and had all our guests roaring with laughter. Interrupting the groom’s speech at the wedding reception? Cracking jokes when your buddy is looking desperately for the words to say that he hopes his wife will remember forever? It turned into a moment that everyone there will remember forever. Anyone else would have bombed on that stage. And then I would have kicked their ass. But this was Jimmy Fallon. He just can’t help himself.”   — Justin Timberlake

Lena Dunham — “Hannah is as vivid and raw a portrait as we have seen — nails bitten to the nub — and despite her glaring faults, we ravenously embrace her. Lena’s unique lack of vanity or shame allows us to consider that we may also be able to accept and express ourselves fully. This is not only impressive, it’s important. Because it turns out that girls don’t just want to have fun. They also want to be known for who they really are.” — Claire Danes

Justin Timberlake — “His star power comes from the fact that he sounds like he’s having fun when he makes music, and he can read a song—meaning as a singer or songwriter you can feel the emotion. You think, I can relate to that or I believe in that, and then the listener can feel it too. When Justin reads a song like “Cry Me a River” or “Suit & Tie,” you become part of that emotion.” — Stevie Wonder

Mindy Kaling — “Mindy Kaling embodies the trifecta of being brilliant, wonderful and hilarious. Because that is statistically impossible, it can mean only one thing: she was created by an evil scientist to lull us into a giddy stupor in order to control our minds.” — Ed Helms

Jimmy Kimmel — “He can interview a major star and be impressed and still cut the star down to human size with the deftness of a brain surgeon. He is the stand-up guy that young male viewers want as their pal late at night. He projects it because he is it.” — Ben Stein

Shonda Rhimes — “Shonda is a storyteller for our times. Courageous in her approach to the work, she’s never played by other people’s rules. Eight years ago, she introduced us to Grey’s Anatomy with an African-American chief of surgery and an Asian character with leading plotlines. Gay, straight, single, divorced, lost, searching — everybody gets a seat at Shonda’s table.” — Oprah Winfrey

For the entire TIME 100 list, click here.


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